DIY Welding Project: Extension Cord Storage Rack [Guide] | MillerWelds

DIY Welding Project: Extension Cord Storage Rack [Guide]

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Extension cord storage is finally solved with this vertical rack for your garage. Follow these instructions to weld your own.

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner

TIME COMMITMENT: 2–3 hours

Here's what you'll need to get started.

TOOLS AND MATERIALS

5052 Aluminum
Miller® Multimatic® 220 AC/DC multiprocess welder
Miller Spectrum® 375 X-TREME™ plasma cutter
Miller Spoolmate™ 150 spool gun

Slip rolls (or anything round that you can use to form your metal) 
 

WARNING: READ AND FOLLOW ALL LABELS AND THE OWNER'S MANUAL.

STEP BY STEP

Welder drawing out shelf location on construction paper

STEP ONE:

Take a piece of construction paper and lay out your shelf locations and determine the radius to bend for the shelves. My rack will have shelves with radiuses of 13", 10", 7" and 4".

Welder using a thin tape measure to measure the length of the shelves

STEP TWO:

Grab a thin tape measure and measure the length of what your shelf needs to be. Mine are 4" wide by 33", 26", 16" and 10".

Welder measuring the distance between shelves

STEP THREE:

Determine the spacing of your shelves based on the number of extension cords you want on each shelf. I chose 6.5", 5" and 3" for the distances between my shelves.

Welder measuring the back plate. Welder cutting it out.

STEP FOUR:

Measure the back plate that you will weld your shelves to. Mine will be cut to 24" by 28".

Welder cutting his shelves

STEP FIVE:

Cut your shelves. Remember the length is determined by the radiuses.

Welder cutting the top of the back plate

STEP SIX:

Cut the radius of the top of the back mounting plate using a plasma cutter.

Divider tab design

STEP SEVEN:

Make divider tabs to keep the cords separated when hung. They need to be taller than the height of the cords with a 1" bend to attach each one to the shelf.

Welder rounding and deburring the divider tabs

STEP EIGHT:

After cutting your tabs, be sure to round your corners and debur any sharp edges.

Welder running his shelves through slip rolls. Welder using a wheel to shape his shelves.

STEP NINE:

Run your shelves through slip rolls to get the radius you are looking for. If you don’t have slip rolls you can use a wheel, a tire or even a metal can.

Welder checking the shape of his shelves against his construction paper

STEP TEN:

Bring your shelves back to the construction paper to verify they match the radiuses you drew out.

Welder welding his divider tab to the shelf

STEP ELEVEN:

Weld your divider tab to the center and edges of your shelves. Mine are 2" from the end on the long shelf, 1.5" on the second shelf and 1" on the third, with no divider tabs on the fourth shelf.

Welder welding his shelves to the back plate

STEP TWELVE:

Weld your shelves to the back plate using a spool gun and starting in the middle of the shelf.

Welder drilling holes into the back plate to hang the storage rack

STEP THIRTEEN:

Drill holes in the back plate to hang the storage rack.

Welder adding his extension cords to the rack

STEP FOURTEEN:

Hang it up and add your extension cords.

About Andy Weyenberg

Andy Weyenberg headshot
Andy Weyenberg began welding at his father’s business a few years before joining the Army. After going to school for Electro-Mechanical, he started working for Miller Electric Mfg. LLC as a technical service rep and training instructor. Andy has built and raced stock cars since he was a teenager — and now builds high-performance street vehicles while also managing the Miller motorsports program.
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