DIY Welding Project: Jack Stand Storage Rack [Guide] | MillerWelds

DIY Welding Project: Jack Stand Storage Rack [Guide]

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Time to declutter your garage — check out this DIY jack stand storage rack that will help keep your jack stands all in one place.

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner +

TIME COMMITMENT: One day or less

Here's what you'll need to get started.

TOOLS AND MATERIALS

Hobart® 1/16" MaxalTig® 4943 or 5356 aluminum wire (or similar filler metal)
.080" thick 5052 aluminum sheet

Stomp shear (or other cutting tool) 
Bending brake or hand bending tool
Wire brush
Acetone
Drill
Sheet metal screws
 

Optional Equipment/Tools


Marker
Tape measure
Square
Clamps
Gas lens for TIG torch
 

WARNING: READ AND FOLLOW ALL LABELS AND THE OWNER'S MANUAL.

STEP BY STEP

Do you have jack stands cluttering up your garage? Then check out this DIY jack stand storage rack that will help keep them all in one place.

STEP ONE:

Measure your jack stands to determine dimensions for each shelf. I made my shelves 9.5” wide x 7.5” deep x 13” tall, with a 7” gusset on the sides.

Bending metal
Cut out each shelf from your aluminum sheet, then make two 90° bends on the sides to create the gussets.
measuring aluminum
Once your shelves are cut and bent, measure each shelf to determine the width and height of the back piece. Mine ended up being 9 5/8” wide x 52” tall.
Cutting an aluminum sheet
Cut the back piece to size.
cleaning an aluminum sheet
Peel the protective film off of the aluminum, then wire brush the areas you’ll be welding and clean with acetone.
tig welding aluminum
Tack weld each shelf to the back piece using a TIG welder. Consider installing a gas lens to the end of your TIG torch, which will help provide better gas coverage on the outer corners.
Welding an aluminum shelf
Once everything is tacked together, fully TIG weld into place.
drilling an aluminum shelf onto the wall
Mount the completed rack to the wall using a drill and sheet metal screws.
jack stands on a shelf
Add your jack stands and enjoy!

About Andy Weyenberg

Andy Weyenberg headshot
Andy Weyenberg began welding at his father’s business a few years before joining the Army. After going to school for Electro-Mechanical, he started working for Miller Electric Mfg. LLC as a technical service rep and training instructor. Andy has built and raced stock cars since he was a teenager — and now builds high-performance street vehicles while also managing the Miller motorsports program.
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