DIY Welding Project: Roll Cage Clamp System [Guide] | MillerWelds

DIY Welding Project: Roll Cage Clamp System [Guide]

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Take the headache out of keeping your roll cage in place when welding with these modified C-clamp locking pliers.

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner

TIME COMMITMENT: 1 hour

Here's what you'll need to get started.

TOOLS AND MATERIALS

Miller® Multimatic® 220 AC/DC multiprocess welder
Medium-sized C-clamp locking pliers
1 1/2" angle iron
1" angle iron

Variety of exhaust clamps for the size tubing you are using 
 

WARNING: READ AND FOLLOW ALL LABELS AND THE OWNER'S MANUAL.

STEP BY STEP

Cutting the top arm of a C-clamp at a 90° angle.

STEP ONE:

Cut the top arm of the C-clamp with the release lever from the outside of the 90° bend to the inside at about a 45° angle.

Cutting the angle iron.

STEP TWO:

Cut about 1 1/2" to 2" of the 1 1/2" angle iron, and cut a 1 1/4" piece off the 1" angle iron.

Cutting the iron to create a lip.

STEP THREE:

On the 1" angle iron piece you just cut off, cut one half of one side off so there’s still a little lip. This will make a larger clamping point for the C-clamp if needed.

Welder deburring and grinding mill scale off the C-clamp.

STEP FOUR:

Be sure to deburr and grind the mill scale and any plating off the C-clamp before welding.

Welder tack welding the back of the C-clamp.

STEP FIVE:

Set your Multimatic 220 AC/DC to the 1/8" setting and weld 1 1/2" angle to the C-clamp. Start by tack welding the front and back, then weld the sides.

Welder welding the outside corners for the exhaust clamps.

STEP SIX:

For the exhaust clamps, weld the outside corners first and then the back side.

Image of the muffler clamp bolted to the parallel clamp.

STEP SEVEN:

Attach the exhaust clamp to the parallel tube and C-clamp to the perpendicular tube.

Image of the muffler clamp using rubber to help prevent denting.

STEP EIGHT:

Be sure to not overtighten the muffler clamps because that can dent the tubing. If nervous, place a thin strip of rubber underneath the exhaust clamp.

About Andy Weyenberg

Andy Weyenberg headshot
Andy Weyenberg began welding at his father’s business a few years before joining the Army. After going to school for Electro-Mechanical, he started working for Miller Electric Mfg. LLC as a technical service rep and training instructor. Andy has built and raced stock cars since he was a teenager — and now builds high-performance street vehicles while also managing the Miller motorsports program.
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