Aluminum Systems Overview - MillerWelds

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Aluminum Systems

Aluminum Systems 


The structural and aesthetic benefits of aluminum continue to make it one of the most specified materials in the industry today. The challenges — whether in transportation, shipbuilding, fabrication, manufacturing or home/hobby — are similar: distortion, cleanliness, quality and speed. Arming yourself with the right equipment and consumables will make the job easier.

Your total welding solutions provider


Miller is committed to providing a total aluminum welding solution for your business. You can count on our easy-to-use equipment to improve quality and increase your productivity, profitability and peace of mind.


Videos

Welding Aluminum With the Dynasty 280 DX Multiprocess Welder

When welding aluminum, follow these tips to set up your Dynasty 280 DX Multiprocess using an ArcReach SuitCase 12 feeder.

Dynasty 280 and Weldcraft Torch Provide Versatility for Aluminum Boat Repairs

Out Back Aluminum Welding relies on the Dynasty 280 DX TIG/Stick welder to gain flexibility and portability for TIG welding on boats — in the shop or at the marina.

Miller Spoolmate 100 MIG Gun for Welding Aluminum

The Spoolmate 100 is the economical and versatile solution for welding aluminum with your Millermatic, handling 4043 alloy and 0.30 to 0.35 aluminum wire.

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Welder welding aluminum with the Millermatic 350P

Learn How Aluminum and Lightweight Materials are Changing Auto Body Repair

Changing fuel economy standards and materials used in vehicle design are placing new demands on collision repair shops.
Close-up of an aluminum weld made using AC welding

Advances in Aluminum Robotic Welding

Aluminum presents several challenges during the welding process, such as burn-through, warping or lack of fusion. Learn about robotic welding systems.

Let the Brown Dog Weld

Josh Welton is a welder by trade. He struck his first arc in November 2002, when he served as a millwright apprentice for Chrysler. “I never grew up thinking I was going to be a welder,” says Welton. “I hired in as a millwright, went through the training, struck an arc and was like ‘This is what I want to do. I want to weld.’”