DIY Welding Project: Swing Out Equipment Stand [Guide] | MillerWelds

DIY Welding Project: Swing Out Equipment Stand [Guide]

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Keep your larger pieces of equipment easily accessible and conveniently stored with this heavy duty swing out stand project.

SKILL LEVEL: Intermediate

TIME COMMITMENT: 3–4 hours

Here's what you'll need to get started.

TOOLS AND MATERIALS

Miller® Millermatic® 255
Miller Spectrum® 625 X-TREME™ plasma cutter
3/8"-thick plate steel
• Top base plate: 8" x 36"
• Top swivel plate: 6" x 8"
• Bottom swivel plates: 5" x 5" (2)
2"x 3" .120 wall tubing

5/16" bolts (to mount the slip roll to the stand) 

5/8" bolts 

1/2" bolts 

Drills and taps 

Plumb bob 

Assortment of wrenches 

Measuring tools 
 

WARNING: READ AND FOLLOW ALL LABELS AND THE OWNER'S MANUAL.

STEP BY STEP

Welder measuring where to attach top and bottom plates to the vertical post.

STEP ONE:

Measure where to place your top and bottom base plates to mount the equipment stand to the vertical post. The bottom swivel plate and mounting base will be attached by a diagonal support tube to help support the weight.

Welder drawing a line to cut the base plates.

STEP TWO:

Use a template to draw a line to cut notches out of the top and bottom base plates so they can be welded to the vertical post.

Welder measuring the pivot point of the top base plate.

STEP THREE:

Measure the pivot point of the top base plate, which will be welded to the post. This will enable the stand to swing around the post. Mine is 2-3/8" away from the corner. That gives me 1-3/8" clearance to work with for the mounting base. Keep in mind you also have to put a weld on the top base plate and it will take up at least 1/4". Follow the same directions for the bottom base plate.

Welder drilling his hole into the top base plate.

STEP FOUR:

Drill your pivot point in the top base plate.

Welder grinding mill scale off the vertical post.

STEP FIVE:

Be sure to grind off the mill scale on the base plates and vertical post to which the stand will be attached.

Welder tack welding the top base plate to the vertical post.

STEP SIX:

Using the Millermatic 255, tack weld the top base plate to the vertical post. Using pulse MIG mode, I set the machine for 3/8"-thick material with Auto-Set™ technology.

Welder using level to verify that the top base plate is level.

STEP SEVEN:

Grab your digital level and make sure your top base plate is level; check both directions before welding in place.

Welder dropping the plumb bob to align with bottom base plate.

STEP EIGHT:

Before welding the bottom base plate, grab your plum bob and drop it through the hole in the top base plate to ensure the pivot points will line up on both base plates. Make your mark and drill a 5/8" hole. Then, weld the bottom base plate to the vertical post.

Welder measuring for clearance.

STEP NINE:

Before drilling your holes in the mounting base, check to make sure your clearance is at least 1" from the weld.

Visual of the 2-½” holes drilled into the mounting base.

STEP TEN:

Machine your 5/8" hole 1" from the end and 2" from the side in your mounting base along with two 1/2" holes, which will be used for your locking bolts. The locking bolts will be tapped into the swivel mounting base once the table is fully extended.

Welder has the top plate shimmed to level it and is measuring for the diagonal support tube.

STEP ELEVEN:

After attaching both the bottom swivel plate and mounting base with your 5/8" bolts, place your digital level on the mounting base and shim it up until it's perfectly level. Then measure for your diagonal support tube that will go from the end of the mounting base to the bottom swivel plate and weld it into place.

Welder wratcheding the 1/2” bolts to tighten them.

STEP TWELVE:

With the mounting base extended out, transfer punch the top holes to the top base plate, drill and tap for your 1/2" locking bolts.

Welder attaching the equipment to the stand.

STEP THIRTEEN:

Determine the equipment mounting hole locations, drill and tap, then mount your equipment.

About Andy Weyenberg

Andy Weyenberg headshot
Andy Weyenberg began welding at his father’s business a few years before joining the Army. After going to school for Electro-Mechanical, he started working for Miller Electric Mfg. LLC as a technical service rep and training instructor. Andy has built and raced stock cars since he was a teenager — and now builds high-performance street vehicles while also managing the Miller motorsports program.
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