DIY Welding Project: Dog Leash Holder [Guide] | MillerWelds

DIY Welding Project: Dog Leash Holder [Guide]

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Learn how to create this custom dog leash holder using your Spectrum® 375 X-TREME plasma cutter and a MIG welder.

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner

TIME COMMITMENT: 3–5 hours

Here's what you'll need to get started.

TOOLS AND MATERIALS

MIG welder
7/16" wrench & socket

Air or electric angle grinder with 80- or 120- grit discs 
Drill & drill bits
12" x 24" 18-gauge sheet steel (Qty 1)
Bolts, 1/4" x 2-1/4" (Qty 6)
1/4" nuts (Qty 12)
1/4" length of 1/4" rubber fuel line hose or equivalent 
(Qty 1)
 



Optional Equipment/Tools


Battery-operated clock mechanism
Paint
Stencils

WARNING: READ AND FOLLOW ALL LABELS AND THE OWNER'S MANUAL.

STEP BY STEP

Step 1

STEP ONE:

Download bone clip art or design your own bone shape and enlarge to your desired size. Mine was about 23-1/8" x 11". I also made my round ends dissimilar instead of symmetrical. I made them 6" and 5" in diameter because the smallest size clock hands I got required a 5-1/2" diameter circle.

Step 2

STEP TWO:

Transfer that shape to the 12" x 24" 18 gauge sheet metal.

Step 3

STEP THREE:

Cut out bone shape with plasma cutter. I took the drag shield off and installed the deflector shield so I could be more exact with my cut.

Step 4

STEP FOUR:

Grind or deburr any sharp edges and plasma dross from the bottom of the cut area.

Step 5

STEP FIVE:

Drill six (or however many dog accessory hangers you want) 1/4" holes for the bolts along the bottom side of your bone. Mine are 3/4" from the bottom, spaced 3-7/16" apart and centered. This means the end bolt started about 3" in from the round edge of the bone. Just lay it out first with marker to be visually centered when using dissimilar size round ends like my sample.

Step 6

STEP SIX:

Making the hanger brackets. Cut two pieces, 3/4" wide x 2-1/4" long, out of the drop-off material from the bone cutting to make hangers.

Step 7

STEP SEVEN:

Drill a 3/16" hole, 3/8" from one end of each piece and drill a 5/16" hole on the other side of each piece (or whatever size hole to fit over the head of the screw you intend to use for mounting to wall). Also drill a hole for the clock in the center of 6" circle if needed. Mine was a 5/16" hole.

Step 8

STEP EIGHT:

Bend two opposing 90-degree bends 3/4" from each end on each of the 2-1/4" long pieces.

Step 9

STEP NINE:

Spot weld each hanger bracket to the back side of your bone using the smaller hole of the hanger bracket. Mine were about 1" from the top flat side and 13-1/2" apart centered side to side.

Step 10

STEP TEN:

Paint and customize. I used Krylon COLORmaxx GLOSS KHAKI for the main color and stole some gloss black craft paint from my wife for the stencil work. I also used some 1/2" tall black stick-on numbers for the clock.

Step 11

STEP ELEVEN:

When dry, install the 1/4" bolts. Run one nut all the way up the threads until bottomed out on the smooth shank of each bolt. Push through your holes and secure with another 1/4" nut on the back side. Install clock mechanism per its instructions.

Step 12

STEP TWELVE:

Install 5/8" of the 1/4" rubber hose on threads of the two outside bolts to protect your wall from scratches and to square the face of the bone to the wall.

About Andy Weyenberg

Andy Weyenberg headshot
Andy Weyenberg began welding at his father’s business a few years before joining the Army. After going to school for Electro-Mechanical, he started working for Miller Electric Mfg. LLC as a technical service rep and training instructor. Andy has built and raced stock cars since he was a teenager — and now builds high-performance street vehicles while also managing the Miller motorsports program.
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