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Thread: .030 or .035

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    105

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    i have a jeep as well and i use 035 in the mm250 for working on the jeep and i use the tig ,, but for the most part the 035 works great for all jeep work. I did use 023 and the little welder tho when i replaced some rust spots
    Jorgensen MFG.
    Custom trailers:from utility to semi trailers i make em all.
    argonweld_bjorn@hotmail.com
    www.ehhitch.com

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    1,788

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    I would use .030 on 3/16", for 1/4" I might be tempted to jump to .035, best is to do some testing and see which one you like at different thickness's. I am using Pinnacle .030 and I guess I will need to try some of their .035 to see how it runs ... it's just that it's hard to get from here.
    Regards, George

    Hobart Handler 210 w/DP3035 - Great 240V small Mig
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  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    831

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    For 16 ga - 1/4" and the ocassional jump up to 3/8", on the MM 210, an .030 wire works the best. Understand too, for the same output power level ( voltage and amperage), the .030 wire has a higher current density then the .035. What this means is the .030 at the same output power level has the potential to produce a deeper penetrating weld. The only real advantage an .035 wire would provide on a unit this size, would be in a production environment. The .035 has a higher deposition rate then the .030, which means the .035 will produce a weld bead quicker. For the hobbyist level weldor, I look upon this as a disadvantage, due to it giving you less time to read the weld puddle.

    I'm assuming on this 3/16" you are trying to use the door chart setting. In my opinion, for a horizontal or flat T joint or lap, the door chart setting is to cold. Jump up to the 1/4" door chart setting ( voltage tap #4) for your starting point on these joints.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Danny View Post
    I'm assuming on this 3/16" you are trying to use the door chart setting. In my opinion, for a horizontal or flat T joint or lap, the door chart setting is to cold. Jump up to the 1/4" door chart setting ( voltage tap #4) for your starting point on these joints.
    That brings up my next question (thank you). This will be a bracket on my axle. This bracket goes on the backside and extends to the bottom of the axle tube. Because of this my weld will start in a vertical down and finish with me lying on my back in a overhead horizontal. Any suggestions that might help me with votlage/wire speed/body position/technique?

    Thanks!

    Mike

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    831

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    Quote Originally Posted by mingoglia View Post
    That brings up my next question (thank you). This will be a bracket on my axle. This bracket goes on the backside and extends to the bottom of the axle tube. Because of this my weld will start in a vertical down and finish with me lying on my back in a overhead horizontal. Any suggestions that might help me with votlage/wire speed/body position/technique?

    Thanks!

    Mike
    If possible, my first choice would be to tack the bracket into position. Then remover the axle from the vehicle, so that I could place the joint in a better position to weld it out.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Danny View Post
    If possible, my first choice would be to tack the bracket into position. Then remover the axle from the vehicle, so that I could place the joint in a better position to weld it out.
    I may actually do that. I've been actually kicking around the idea especially since I don't have a lift. I did a repair similiar to this (with stick) on the trail with a couple of batteries, some jumper cables, and some 6011. Yeah, MIG will be much easier (in a controlled environment especially) but I'm having flash backs.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    asheville n.c.
    Posts
    618

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    i like .030 for repairing silverware at the local chinese restaurant to get 25% off my meal

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oahu, Hawaii
    Posts
    2,469

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    Sure you want to do vertical down on a axle bracket? Haven't done anything that critical with mig, but like on stick, vertical up has more penetration...
    Let me know if I'm wrong or misled.
    thanks,
    bert
    I'm not late...
    I'm just on Hawaiian Time

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