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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3

    Default Millermatic 175 Connections

    I am running a feed from my dryer circuit to my garage for my welder. My fuse panel is in a finished rec room downstairs so no access and this is my only alternative. (New house 2003) The dryer circuit is a standard 2/30 amp (so 60 amp total) using 10 gauge wire. I have tapped into the dryer circuit ran the wire into the attic and then down a chase into a utility closet (about 75 feet total run) in the garage using 10 guage wire Romex wire colors are red, white, black and a bare ground. I need to use a NEMA 6-50R for the welder and wanted to know how to wire the connections for the receptacle. My research indicates that the white wire will not be used on the 6-50R receptacle, red, black and ground will.

    Does this sound correct?

    Thanks -

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Clark County, NV
    Posts
    2,696

    Default

    You have a TOTAL of 30A available. The two legs DO NOT add together.

    However, this is not a problem; many of us (including myself) have powered MM175s or similar machines from dryer receptacles for years.

    Keep in mind that your TAP, though, is NOT to Code. Code requires each of these circuits to be dedicated. If you had diverted instead of tapped, it would be better. Is there EVER a chance of the two machines being on at the same time? Is there EVER a chance of this installation still being there after you are gone? Things to consider...

    Now on with the fun. You are correct. In fact, you did NOT need to tap the white wire and bring it over at all, so you could have used a cheaper Romex. In either case, don't use it at all in the NEMA 6-50R receptacle. Just safe it off somehow or remove it from the tap, because it will carry current every time the dryer is operating.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Yes - I know it is not code. There is no electrician that will come in and wire this up for me due to code. I will jusst disconnect it when I move. I was under the impression that since the 30amp fuses were joined as 1 (small bar connecting the two)in the fuse panel that gave me 60. The dryer is 28amps, why would they use a 30 amp breaker? Isn't that pushing it?

    I understand that the dryer cannot be used when I am welding and vice versa. The MM175 draws 19.9 amps...so even 30amps should be fine?

    Again I am no electrician and I know the proper way to due it is to get an electrician to wire it up. That would entail removing most of the drywall from my family room to get to the fuse panel. Dryer is on the second floor and I have access to the attic so I figured this was the next best thing.

    -Jeff

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Clark County, NV
    Posts
    2,696

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nolift911
    I was under the impression that since the 30amp fuses were joined as 1 (small bar connecting the two)in the fuse panel that gave me 60. The dryer is 28amps, why would they use a 30 amp breaker? Isn't that pushing it?
    I'm having trouble picturing what you are describing, but a typical dryer receptacle is a 2-pole (meaning 240V in most residential settings) 30-A breaker. Are these breakers or fuses? Is this the main panel to the residence or some sort of subpanel or disconnect? The dryer may be rated to draw a maximum of 28A, but it probably rarely "pushes it." Yes, ideally, you shoot for 80%; good observation.

    I understand that the dryer cannot be used when I am welding and vice versa. The MM175 draws 19.9 amps...so even 30amps should be fine?
    Yes, you can run the MM175 with no problem from that circuit. It also has a built-in circuit protection and can be plugged in to 50A receptacles when necessary.

    Again I am no electrician and I know the proper way to due it is to get an electrician to wire it up. That would entail removing most of the drywall from my family room to get to the fuse panel. Dryer is on the second floor and I have access to the attic so I figured this was the next best thing.
    I'm sure you did an acceptable job, but an electrician's experience may have come in handy. I've always found a way into a flush-mounted panel without removing drywall. Sometimes more interesting methods than others, and usually involving special tools, but nearly always possible.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3

    Default

    No sub panel - just the main panel. I think we are saying the same thing. Anyway I wired it up and now just need for my welder to get here. I look at breakers and fuses as the same.... These are toggles if that helps, two 30 amp connected by a bar. Agreed on the electrician front but I fail to see how I could have gotten a wire from the far corner of my house where the panel is on the ground floor to my garage. Lots of drywall work needed there and I don't think I am really up for that right now with this option as my second best. I feel good about using 10 gauge with the correct receptacle so no worries. I put a wire nut on the white wire and tucked it into the receptacle box.

    Again - trying to be as safe as possible without major remodeling. Is it code and is it the correct way to do it?...no. I will simply remove the circuit when I sell the house and use a plate for the outlet in the garage for the new owners. I am sure a pre-home-inspection from a new buyer would spot that right away anyway.

    -Jeff

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Clark County, NV
    Posts
    2,696

    Default

    You wired it right and it will power that welder with no problems.

    The reason the 30A doesn't add is because it goes out one leg while coming in the other leg, but it's still 30A. What DOES add is the voltage, which is why you have a 240V receptacle now, not a 120V.

  7. #7

    Default Creative wiring

    It's kind of difficult to see the garage lights dimming when you have the helment down and a weld going. Once I figured out it was my power source causing inconsistant welds, I went to plan B. I built a junction box that would plug into the dryer outlet, I plug the dryer into the box, and I have a lead coming from the junction box to a sub-panel I put in the garage. The sub-panel feeds a 240V 30A (P6-30) receptical and a duplex 115 30A receptical.

    The battle now is - who is in charge, the dryer or the welding machines - you can guess who wins that battle (not me).

    Steve

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Clark County, NV
    Posts
    2,696

    Default

    Creative yes. And many of us have done similar setups. But if we are holding it as an example, we should also mention that such a setup is a violation of the National Electrical Code, so it should be temporary and only considered if doing it properly is not feasible for some reason. But, it does work.

    I got lucky when I did something similar; we had a gas dryer and I only had to extend a gas line a few feet and could take ALL the time from the dryer circuit!

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