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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    642

    Default Input Power Supply To MM210 - What to use?

    The MM210 requires about 30 Amps at 230 V Input.

    My sources at the moment include the following.

    Generac Generator capable of 240 Volts at 31.5 Amps

    240 Volt AC Service at oulet used also for Dryer

    In either case I will need to make a pigtail extension.

    The manuals says to use 10 guage solid wire, and if standed wire is used a larger guage wire may be needed.

    I was going to make a 30 foot ext for the Generator using 600V rated 10/3 rubber insulated wire, however the manual leads me to think it may not be a good idea. On the other hand the power cord on the MM210 itself is only 12/3.

    I guess I could make a solid conductor cable for the Generator but it would not be flexible in use.

    As for the house wiring, I know I can run a line from the house to where I will be using the welder, at least while in use at home.

    I do so much want to use this with the Generator but so much do not want to burn anything up.

    I could probably put a new power cable on the MM210 using 10/3 and installing a generator connector on that, thus eliminating the 'pigtail' connector between the two.

    Any ideas before I call Miller in the next day or so?

    THANKS

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Abilene, Texas
    Posts
    639

    Default

    I just got my new 210 a few weeks ago. I built up an extension about 15 feet long for it with 10/3 rubber coated wire. I don't see where there is a problem at all using 10/3 up to 50 feet or probably longer. I did just like you... I went one size larger than the pigtail coming out of the welder. As for the generator, I have no knowledge there. The only thing that might worry me about running it off of the generator is whether or not the power will remain constant when you load and unload the generator. Hopefully, it will work good for you.

    I was initially looking at the MM135 or, more likely, the MM175 and decided to step up to the 210 pretty much based on all of the positive input on this forum concerning the MM210. I'm still trying to get used to the wire system since I grew up on stick welders. It's coming around though and I've enjoyed it.
    Jim

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Default

    i would defenetly go with the dryer outlet, the gen will be over working and the MM210 will be underpowerd and also over working. you also will have large power swings with the generator causing bad starts and inconsistant arc's. the bigger engen driven welders were designed for this unlike the genaric 5500W home depot version. save the headack and stick to the dryer outlet.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    642

    Default

    Thanks, I'll keep that in mind.

    Will just make a 75 foot or so run of UF 8 ga between the house and the shed where the welding will take place.

    The Generac we have is 7550 Watt and will surge up to 13500 watts, but yeah I can see the concern with power flucuations.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    642

    Default

    Well I think we have a plan ...

    Pull the 30 Amp breaker from the feed box and install a 50 Amp breaker.

    Run 8 ga wire from the breaker to the dryer, from there continue on with 8 ga to an outlet for the welder.

    Maybe this makes sense, maybe not.

    I will reread it in the morning when I am awake.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    16919 Pole Rd. Brethren, MI 49619
    Posts
    4,395

    Default

    My puter is running slow so I am headed to bed too. Maybe when Hank comes on he will elaborate but,,, the 10 is plenty for this machine especially for home use. The dryer needs to stay on a 30A circuit, you could upsize the wire but you cant change the breaker, the dryer is designed to be protected at that level. Show us a pic of your panel, why run a new wire to there and then on to a welder circuit, why not run its own on its own breaker? Do not lose sleep over solid vs stranded wire, there are several other more pressing issues here than that. There are special rules for feeding power to out buildings especially if there is power already in it. You can get all the wiring info right here, you do not need to pester Miller with calls.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Default

    i agree with Sberry dont upsize the dryer breaker thinkig you can run 2 X as much stuff, you could get 1/2 sized breaker's so you could take out the 30 amp and put in 2 new breakers one 30A for the dryer and add one for the welder if you need space in the breaker box.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    642

    Default

    Was not planning on running both dryer and welder at same time.

    Breaker box is full at this point - will look into half sized breakers to make room.

    Why run a new wire? Mainly for peace of mind. This is an old house and I like knowing that the line is clean and without any issues.

    I am extremelt fearful of house fires as we are out in the stick so to speak and by the time the Vol Fire Dept got here, all they'd need would be brooms. LOL

    We'll get this worked out in some fashion by the end of the day! LOL

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Abilene, Texas
    Posts
    639

    Default

    I agree that running the #8 UF out to the welder is better than stringing extension cord. If you are out of room in your breaker box, you can probably add a small breaker box right next to it. I just finished revamping my setup so that I could run 2 welders and a 240v air compressor, each on their own circuits. My box was full also so I used the one double breaker slot (that had fed the welder) to feed the new box I set next to it. It's got a 70 amp in it. Now I have 3 240v outlets neatly side by side and everything is on it's own breaker. Hey, it just part of the fun of buying a new welder.
    Jim

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    16919 Pole Rd. Brethren, MI 49619
    Posts
    4,395

    Default

    If you are going to use the dryer circuit just plug a cord into it. A dryer is a dedicated circuit, extending it is not really within the intent of the code. If I was going to work in this shed all the time it would get a new entrance fed from your main panel and be done with it. http://www.selfhelpandmore.com/homew...rage/index.htm

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