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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Wheeling
    Posts
    169

    Default OT - Basement Heaters

    Guys, I do a lot of fine hand work as a part of my business and I recently set everything up for that type of work in my basement and it's cold down there. Especially this week.

    Does any one have suggestions about going with baseboard heaters or those ceramic heaters or whatever. Putting in a wood burner may be on the slate for next summer, but I don't want to do a hurry up job on the installation and I want to find out if that will change my insurance. Plus the Chimney would be rather tall to get above the house.

    Thanks,

    Jerry

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    642

    Default Basement Heat

    We have a similar situation in that we at time are working in the basement.

    We realized early on trying to heat our basement was a rediucously futile effort as it is 100% below surface and unfinished. Previously we opted for small electric (ceramic) heaters. We have 3 and only one we like. They are all rated " 1500 " watts however the older one ( all metal housing ) puts out more heat.
    [QUOTE] (climbing on soap box)
    Our power company has announced that after 7 years of operating with a Democrat Legislature mandated Price Cap as part of Utility Deregulation, the cap has expired and electric rates are expected to increase by at least 50%. Ya gotta love how the Democrats look out for the people. ( climbing off soap box )[/QUOTE ]
    In any case not wanting to increase funding of the utility company we looked at 2 options. Kerosene heater and Propane. Given the hazard of CO gas and it being heavier than air, we felt being in a basement below ground that was not a good option.

    Now we use a propane heater mounted atop a 20# tank. It is a 'radiant' heat and throw heat forward of the element. We move the tank from one area to the next depending on what we are doing. Probably not the best method, but it works well enough for us. We manage out workload so as to minimize time spent down in the dungeon.

    If you are working at a desk or over a table, the ceramic heat under the table works good. The heat it puts out will rise around the table where you are working.

    Another old trick we have seen done. ( my dad did this years ago ) Venting the clothes dryer into the basement. It works but can cause lint in the basement area if you dont take extra steps to trap it. Also it introduces humidity, which in the winter time may not be all that bad as it helps to keep heat in a bit, maybe.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Wheeling
    Posts
    169

    Default

    Har,

    I may try one of those ceramic disk heaters for the moment. I can get the radiant heat type and put it on top of a 20 propane bottle and use it.

    Torpedo heaters and kerosene heaters are not good because they do set off the CO detector, I use kerosene heater in my hot work shop building.

    Jerry

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Wheeling
    Posts
    169

    Default

    I have found a radiant heater that will work in my basement, I have natural gas and have an outlet with a valve near where it could go.

    Jerry

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Salem ,Ohio
    Posts
    3,861

    Cool

    I guess i am one of the lucky ones. I have a gas fired hot water boiler and lots of 2" and 3" pipe full of hot water running around my basement. I moved my SB lathe indoors a few years back and my metal cutting bandsaw last week along with my steel pile. I have about 1,000 pcs to cut so i might as well do it where its warm without heating the shop. The welding is going to have to wait until it warms up a little...Bob
    Bob Wright, Grandson of Tee Nee Boat Trailer Founder
    Metal Master Fab Salem, Oh 44460
    Birthplace of the Silver & Deming Drill
    1999 MM185 w/185 Spoolgun,1986 Thunderbolt AC/DC
    Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Sacramento CA
    Posts
    80

    Unhappy

    Propane heaters produce carbon monoxide gas that can kill in an enclosed space.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Posts
    304

    Default

    My uncle was in a similar position a few years back. He sectioned off part of his basement with insulated walls to make a small work shop. That area is 20X20 +/- It is easy to climate control. He uses that as his working area and the rest of the basement for storing his supplies and just brings material in as he is ready for it. Just a thought, I don't know how much material you are dealing with or how much room will actually be needed. SSS

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Wichita, Kansas
    Posts
    107

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KEENAVV View Post
    Propane heaters produce carbon monoxide gas that can kill in an enclosed space.
    Ventless propane heaters are readily available and are safe for use in enclosed spaces. And are much more efficient than vented heaters - no heat loss out the flue.

    I used one in my (small) woodshop for a couple of seasons until I finally realized the water running down the window panes and the high humidity warping my wood supply was due to the super abundance of water vapor being pumped into the air by the heater.

    Replaced it with a vented heater when I enlarged the workshop, but the replacement was for humidity control rather than because of any CO problems.
    Tom Veatch
    Wichita, KS

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Wheeling
    Posts
    169

    Default

    I installed a 10,000 BTU ventless, natural gas heater this morning. The basement is not as partifiant off as it will be, but that heater raised the temp in the basemt up 8 degrees in 2 hours.

    I have no gas leaks, checked with soapy water. It started up close to what the manual said to do. I used the if all else fails, insteas of the piso sparker, I used a match.

    It runs fine, this is going to become the test for using a 30,000 BTU one in a 2 car garage that converted in to my machine shop.


    Jerry

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Wheeling
    Posts
    169

    Default

    The basement has been sitting at 68 degrees for several hours now and I set the heater to low and the temp is staying at 68.

    Jerry

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