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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    PA
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    110

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    This is the way I did it on my press. Mostly the stuff in red. Basically, I saw the idea somewhere and did it with a couple of modifications. The die holder on top is just three pieces of 1/2 inch plate plug welded together. They are staggered to hold standard dies. 1/2 inch plate is bolted to the sides to keep the top die straight as it comes down. Springs pull the die back up to assist the single acting cyclinder. FWIW, it seems like it took about 28 tons pressure to bend the piece of 3/8 X 5 inch plate in the picture. I might be misremembering or my gauge might be wrong. Other pictures of dies to bend round corners and some misc. dies. Hope this helps if you decide to build one like this. Sorry if this is a thread hijack. I can still use this as a regular press by using attachments in the top die holder.

    Twocentsworth.
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  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    S.W. Pennsylvania
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    2,250

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    No highjack what so ever , I didnt post looking for advice, just to share knowledge. Youre right on target.
    Do you get an even brake left to right ? Looks pretty nice.
    To all who contribute to this board.
    My sincere thanks , Pete.

    Pureox OA
    Westinghouse 300 amp AC stick
    Miller Syncrowave 250
    Hexacon 250 watt solder iron

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM, USA
    Posts
    225

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    Pete,
    Yes, making the sides move equally is the challenge. This is where I have been looking at several types of mechanisms to accomplish this, but in the end, since this is for a home shop, it is probably not necessary. I can always bend in the middle...

    Twocentsworth,
    Thanks for the pictures. Yes, this is what I was thinking as well. That is very close to what I was picturing other than I will probably use round linear bearings at the ends of the upper die mount to guide it.
    Do you have any problems bending evenly across the die? Have you bent anything full width yet, and if so, how uniform was the bend across part? 28T is a lot of pressure. My understanding is that the lower die controls the bend radius in the part, and therefore the pressure required to bend the piece. I think the general rule is something like 8* material thickness for the lower die V width.

    Did you make your press too? If so, what hydraulics did you use?

    Thank you for sharing. It definitely helps in my confidence level that what I want to do it reasonable and will be effective in the end. I don't need a 4' wide shoppress, I need a 4' wide shop press/brake! The brake aspect was the unknown.

    Joshua

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    110

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    Quote from burninbriar:

    Do you get an even brake left to right ?
    As far as I can tell it works well. I never have bent anything full width so don't know how much that top die would deflect. I did not make a bottom die holder. It seems to work out just to put the bottom die between a couple of pieces of plate and line it up by eye. It almost seems to self center a bit.
    Here is a link to some die information. They changed the site. I think you have to download the catalog. It shows what is available and can give some ideas. On page 6, it shows some radius bending.
    jolane,

    I did not make the press. The limit of my knowledge on the width of the dies is the thicker the metal the wider the bottom die needed, so what you said about the width sounds good. There have been many people that have made their own bottom dies out of angle. I bent about ten of these brackets in the picture which were 5/16 x 3 inch. Once I got on to the positioning of the top die on my marks, the repeatability was right on. As I recall, it took about 6-8 tons pressure to bend them. Slow going with these hand press machines, but it does work.

    Twocentsworth
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  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    S.W. Pennsylvania
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    2,250

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    Nothing bad looking about those bends. I would think you could bottom out youre dies empty and then clamp blocks around youre bottom die to keep it from moveing if you have a lot of bends to make. I have worked on a regular press brake before so I do have some knowledge of the dies, although most of my work in the past has been with a strait leaf. I see dies on ebay a lot that seem to go pretty resonably priced.
    To all who contribute to this board.
    My sincere thanks , Pete.

    Pureox OA
    Westinghouse 300 amp AC stick
    Miller Syncrowave 250
    Hexacon 250 watt solder iron

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM, USA
    Posts
    225

    Default

    Some more food for thought... I was also hoping to build mine such that it could use other "tooling" to turn it into an English wheel. I don't think that this would be too difficult to do. The pressure could be applied just like a typical english wheel, through the lower die with an acme threaded rod. In this same manner, I think I could also make a set of dies to turn it into a rolling machine. Maybe one set of dis could be used to roll sheet stock, and a different attachment to roll tubing.

    My machine could end up like a Smith workshop (is that the name?). Again, for my environment, this would be perfectly acceptable to tear down a setup to do a different process.

    Twocentsworth,
    That bracket looks great. That is the sort of stuff I can envision needing to do, plus long bends in thin sheet stock (fuel tanks, angle, etc). On the lower die, yeah the size is important and related to the tonnage required for bending. Are you air or bottom forming? Bottom forming requires a lot more pressure.

    Joshua

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    110

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    I don't know if I'm air forming or bottom forming. When I bend some Aluminum 6061 T6 for box shapes etc. I use a top die with a radius since I have heard 6061 likes to crack. It still could be cracking, but I have not seen it with old and half blind eyes. I did a dye test on one just to check and it was OK. Mostly, with the steel I bend I am just shooting for an angle and really don't care how I get it. BTW, these dies will overbend a 90 so care has to be taken as it's easier to bend a little more than unbend. To check a bend and bend a little more, I just back off the press just enough to slide the piece out the side, check with a square, replace, and try to go farther if not bent enough. It takes a little practice to understand the machine, dies, and metal being bent, as each may have a little different springback etc.

    The English wheel idea would probably work, but would be limited be the press uprights. Also, with hydraulics, even if the cylinder bottomed, there always seems to be a little play or give, so not sure how that would compare to something purely mechanical.

    Don't know what to say about the roller idea. I guess if space is limited, or if a person is so inclined, there is almost nothing that can't be done.

    Picture of Aluminum box.

    Twocentsworth
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