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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    3

    Cool solid wire or flux core

    Just would like to get input on weather to us solid wire or flux core. Which is cheaper or better to use? Does the flux core have problems like stick after sitting around for a whileand gets damp? I'm looking at buying a miller 210 for the farm. What are the quality differences between the miller, hobart and lincoln? I want to do it right the first time instead of purchasing and then regret it latter. I like this message board for ideas and the projects.
    Last edited by sparkey; 11-27-2005 at 12:44 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Salem ,Ohio
    Posts
    3,898

    Cool

    I have the MM185 which is the model the 210 was built from. I love it. Had it 6 years. I have the spoolgun which i just used about 10 minutes ago to reach up into a truck bed, with .030 solid steel wire. I use .030 solid wire and 75/25 but i am inside and don't want to mess with the flux core. Being on the farm and outside you may want a spool of flux core to use on windy days. I have a large assortment of wires to use for different jobs what ever comes in. I don't know about the comparison between a Lincoln because i bought the right one the first time. . You can't go wrong with a MM210...Bob
    Bob Wright, Grandson of Tee Nee Boat Trailer Founder
    Metal Master Fab Salem, Oh 44460
    Birthplace of the Silver & Deming Drill
    1999 MM185 w/185 Spoolgun,1986 Thunderbolt AC/DC
    Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    986

    Default

    yeah i used to have a home depot lincoln and never had problems with flux-core and i also welded in very windy days. if you weld outside i would'nt go with gas because the wind may blow the gas away.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Green Bay, WI
    Posts
    65

    Default

    Would it be bad to weld with solid wire outside if the wind isn't too bad or is that a no-no all around?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    10

    Default

    With no wind, sure solid is okay outside, you may have to flow some more gas though. Flux core tends to burn hotter so it tends to warp lighter sheet metal. It's just the thing for welding heavier guage stuff and cold rolled, in my case up to 3/16 (Cricket XL!, ohhh, if only Santa would bring me a DVI!). Don't let the solid wire get damp though. It'll rust and cause nothing but grief, it took me some time and a few spoiled rolls to figure this out...duhhhh. Just take the roll out and keep it wrapped up in the dry when not in use. The flux core doesn't seem to mind the damp though.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Green Bay, WI
    Posts
    65

    Default

    What about penetration? Would your average stick welder penetrate farther than say a DVI on flux core? (Waiting for my DVI too getting one this summer )

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Salem ,Ohio
    Posts
    3,898

    Default

    Normally i use 100% .030 solid in my shop. Today i was welding outside on my neighbors truck, flux core would have been nice...Bob
    Bob Wright, Grandson of Tee Nee Boat Trailer Founder
    Metal Master Fab Salem, Oh 44460
    Birthplace of the Silver & Deming Drill
    1999 MM185 w/185 Spoolgun,1986 Thunderbolt AC/DC
    Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    500

    Cool to buy or not to buy

    i'm that little voice in your head Matic 251 or you'll be sorrrrrry
    Flux core I think there is only 2 types *Fabco Hobart XL-71 .045
    ESAB 7100 ultra dual sheild .045
    Solid wire pretty much any .045 or.035 will do

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Plainview, TX
    Posts
    334

    Default

    I recently ran out of 75AR/25CO2 and wire at the same time in my dads MM200. We were running a 220 CF bottle with a 33# spool of Esab Dual Shield 7011 Ultra in 0.035. The Esab wire welded great but had to up the gas flow to about 25 CFH to help cut down splatter. When we went for gas, we swapped out to a 120 CF bottle for a little easier handling and ordered a 25# roll of Lincoln Outersheild 71M. I just used it, the Outershield 71M, for the first time the other day; I had been using some regular Hobart Wire till we got the flux core in. The Lincoln wire runs great in the machine and has almost not splatter at all, except when striking the arc. Gas is running at 20 CFH and this stuff just sizzles while it welds. Great out of position welding, puddles great, penitrates good. This stuff was $105 for the spool from Airgas. The Esab 7100 was priced at $225 from the same place. The guy at Airgas told my dad a lot of welding shops in Lubbock were using the Lincoln wire because it welded good and was cheaper and easier to get than the Esab. Esab just settled a labor strike and prices shot way up and supplies were hard to get while the strike was on.

    About welding in windy conditions. Use stick if you are outside, unless you have a way to put up a truely reliable wind break. It is possible for you to blow the gas away from your mig when welding by simply breathing to hard under the hood. Any breaze at all can blow the shield gas away. If it is windy out side, especially with a SE, Southerly, or SW wind around my area, I have to shut the shop door down to block the wind. I don't shut it all the way, but enough to block the wind to not interfere while welding. Running stick out side on a windy day, 35MPH+, can mess you up as well.

    About voltage. 110/115/120 is how voltage is commonly referred to. Depending on the time of day and the load usage at your place, the voltage in your wall plug can be anywhere from 110 to 120V. My wall sockets generally show around 118 to 120V. But around 5:00pm, when people in the neighborhood start coming home and switching things on in the house, I have seen it drop to 110 to 113 until the line surge levels out and things settle down around 115 to 117. When the demand drops, the voltage goes back to 118 to 120. 220/230/240 V is just the combining of the two 110/115/120 V Single Phase legs to get the higher voltage. People tend to call 110/220V, 115/230V, and 120/240V by what is the most common reading in their area.

    The most common 3 Phase in my area is 4-Wire 230V 3 Phase and 480V 3-Wire (Delta) and 4-Wire (Grounded Delta) 3 Phase. The 4-Wire 230V 3 Phase generally has two low legs, 110 to 120V per leg, and is capable of providing 115V and 230V 1 Phase from those to legs, back to ground and/or neutral, if available. The high leg is generally 208V. But when you check from either of the low legs to the high leg, you get 220V to 240V, thus 230V 3 Phase. The 480V 3 Phase tends to check out around 487V to 497V in my area, with no load. Start the pump and check the voltage under load, viola, 480V. Don't have many Wye connections around these parts, not on the farms anyway. I have seen allot of the 277/480V 3 phase in industrial setting, in town, not out in the country, not around here anyway.

    Franklin Electric Submersible Motors show a NAMEPLATE VOLTAGE on all of their products. Single Phase Motors tend to be listed as 110 or 220V. Three Phase motors are listed 220 and 460V. The key to them, when the motor is running under a load, is the voltage within 10% of name plate value. My example of the 480V 3 phase checking 497V with no load and checking 480V under a load is within the 10% of name plate. If the NO LOAD was checking 500V or higher, the motor running under a load would be well over 480; have seen a motor running 498V load and 516V no load. That is time to call the power company and have the lineman adjust the buck/boost transformer a bit.

    I hope that this dialouge was informative and educational for all.
    '77 Miller Bluestar 2E on current service truck
    '99 Miller Bobcat 225NT for New Service Truck
    '85 Millermatic 200 in Shop

    '72 Marquete 295 AC cracker box in Shop
    '07 Hypertherm Powermax 1000 G3 Plasma Cutter in Shop
    Miller Elite and Digital Elite Hoods

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Bulverde, Tx
    Posts
    1,244

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by flukecej View Post
    I recently ran out of 75AR/25CO2 and wire at the same time in my dads MM200. We were running a 220 CF bottle with a 33# spool of Esab Dual Shield 7011 Ultra in 0.035. The Esab wire welded great but had to up the gas flow to about 25 CFH to help cut down splatter. When we went for gas, we swapped out to a 120 CF bottle for a little easier handling and ordered a 25# roll of Lincoln Outersheild 71M. I just used it, the Outershield 71M, for the first time the other day; I had been using some regular Hobart Wire till we got the flux core in. The Lincoln wire runs great in the machine and has almost not splatter at all, except when striking the arc. Gas is running at 20 CFH and this stuff just sizzles while it welds. Great out of position welding, puddles great, penitrates good. This stuff was $105 for the spool from Airgas. The Esab 7100 was priced at $225 from the same place. The guy at Airgas told my dad a lot of welding shops in Lubbock were using the Lincoln wire because it welded good and was cheaper and easier to get than the Esab. Esab just settled a labor strike and prices shot way up and supplies were hard to get while the strike was on.

    .
    FWIW, Lincoln has a flow rate spec of 40-55 cfh on OS 71M.
    Don


    '06 Trailblazer 302
    '06 12RC feeder
    Super S-32P feeder

    HH210 & DP3035 spool gun
    Esab Multimaster 260
    Esab Heliarc 252 AC/DC

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