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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    3

    Smile i need some hel plz

    hey im new to metalworking and do not yet have a welder. i want to buy a mig welder and i need one that is reliable yet cheap, and preferably new or rarely used. i was looking at the websites and was thinking the HOBART handler 140, the MILLER millermatic 135, or the LINCOLN SP-135t. Also, i need a tubing bender that is cheap and was wondering how the sheiding gas worked and what i needed to weld steel and aluminum.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    3

    Default

    ok i found this website www.cyberweld.com and the hobart handler 140 is on there for only 490$ so if anyone ahs ever used this site to buy a welder please share if their service was good or the product was all messed up.

  3. #3

    Default

    I bought a Miller Spectrum Thunder from them, and later some parts...they are great to deal with...the products were ahead of schedule and were all new stuff, not reconditioned. Prices were the lowest I could find. For a MIG unit, I would recommend the Hobart 140, or a great fluxcore unit is the Hobart 125.
    Arcin' and Sparkin', Rocky D

    "Experience is the name we give our mistakes"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    2

    Default

    I have the impression that you are looking for the best price on what you can afford. If this is the case, perhaps you should do a search on ebay for the Hobart Handler 140 or whatever model you decide on. Hobart 140s can be had from Indiana Oxygen Co. for $452 with free shipping.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    130

    Default Mig Welder

    I have a NIB LincolnPro-Mig 135 for sale - same as the SP-135.
    http://www.mylincolnelectric.com/Ca...heet.asp?p=2515
    I'd like to get $400. + shipping.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    47

    Default

    i dont know what kind of tube your bending but you can get a pipe bender from harbor frieght for less than $100 but its for black pipe tube bends for small tubes try woodward fab , large tubes www.pro-tools.com harbor frieght has a good notcher uses hole saws just get a good bi-metal hole saw

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    25

    Default

    I've done up to 1/2'' mild steel with the mm 135 with multipass. jus make shure u have a 20 amp breaker.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    NW Montana
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by t0rchwelder
    I've done up to 1/2'' mild steel with the mm 135 with multipass. jus make shure u have a 20 amp breaker.
    Yes make sure you have a 20 amp breaker.. i have a hobart 140 and had some trouble poping breakers for a while...also i believe they have fixed the problem but on my model role of wire was held on the spindle with a wing nut...this would back off and the wire would then spool off and make a big mess . i corrected the problem by putting a nylock nut on the spindle.
    best of luck, Nick

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    S.W. Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,249

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wworks
    hey im new to metalworking and do not yet have a welder. i want to buy a mig welder and i need one that is reliable yet cheap, and preferably new or rarely used. i was looking at the websites and was thinking the HOBART handler 140, the MILLER millermatic 135, or the LINCOLN SP-135t. Also, i need a tubing bender that is cheap and was wondering how the sheiding gas worked and what i needed to weld steel and aluminum.
    What thickness of steel and aluminum do you expect to work with ? I would take the heavyest material I would be welding and get a machine big enough to weld a little heavier. you dont want to be running a machine at its maximum capacity all the time.
    To all who contribute to this board.
    My sincere thanks , Pete.

    Pureox OA
    Westinghouse 300 amp AC stick
    Miller Syncrowave 250
    Hexacon 250 watt solder iron

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Calgary, AB
    Posts
    52

    Default

    I use my mm135 for most of my welding. It's a great welder, but it does draw a lot of amps. Long runs of extension cord are not good. I run it with flux core when I'm away from the shop so that I'm not having to haul tanks and gauges.
    I'll try to explain this next part as simple as I can. Sheilding gas is used to keep impurities in the air out of the weld puddle. Without it, your welds will be garbage. Fluxcore is like stick welding in which it has a flux that sheilds the weld puddle, instead of using a gas. Once the weld cools, it forms a slag which is chipped off the weld with a hammer and/or wire brush. Fluxcore is a 'hotter' weld than with gas, so it tends to distort thin metal more. You also get more spatter (little round balls of metal) around the weld, and in my opinion (I'm not sure if this is true or not) but I think there's a lot more smoke.
    For the most part, any of the mig welders you mentions will weld steel with either gas or flux. Aluminum requires you to a buy spool gun. Aluminum is too soft to try and push it all the way from the machine to the end of you gun. What a spool gun does it put a small spool of aluminum wire right at the handle of the gun.
    Now don't take this as a slight, but just from the questions you asked it appears that you have little or no knowledge of welding. I am, however, impressed that you want to learn something new, and in my opinion, nothing is better than learning how to weld, because welders are the coolest people around! I would suggest that you look into taking a introductory coarse at you local college. Most have weekend or evening coarses that will give you a grasp of the basics. There's a reason welders charge what they do, because it's not something that you can just do, it's a skilled trade. Welding, as with most things in life, comes with practice, so don't get discouraged when you ruin a few projects. You'll learn more from your mistakes than you ever will from finally getting it right. And remember that there are a lot of people right here in this forum that can answer just about any question that you have.
    Good luck, have fun and welcome to the wonderful world of welding (that sounded like something you'd here at the end of those films in high school shop class!).
    Jeff.
    The difference between No One. and No. One is where you put the period. John Force

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