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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    collinsville, ok
    Posts
    86

    Default

    looks like we got a handle on the problem but, does anyone have any ideas on how to fix the problem?
    all of us together can't do a whole lot but, if aws, miller, lincoln, ect. could sponser some sort of campaign that would get adults and kids attention it might work.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Littlestown Pa.
    Posts
    30

    Lightbulb i agree

    i agree they should get a program set up so us kids and the adults can become more educated on the subject of welding. Im the only guy in my high school that wants to become a welder im the only one out of the 5 or 6hundred in my school that is sad considering its supposed to b one of the most wanted jobs.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Littlestown Pa.
    Posts
    30

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    Quote Originally Posted by harcosparky View Post
    Here is something else contributing to the problem ....

    Vocational/Technical classes are all but non-existent in today's High School curriculums.

    By the time I was in the 11th Grade I could set type by hand from a California Job Case ( Print Shop ), Turn a Baseball bat on a lathe ( Woodshop ), Build, troubleshoot and repiar various electronic circuitry ( Electronics Shop ).

    These course were a year long, all 4 quarters in the selected shop class.

    The only shop class I did not take was Automotive. I took this one after 12th grade during the summer at a Vo-Tech High School.

    Todays high school student is lucky to get 1/2 of year in a so called Shop Class. if and when the do build something, they end up assembling a PURCHASED KIT.

    Whenever you see or hear the ads about " Are your kids getting enough ART and MUSIC " in school, remember they are missing SHOP CLASS as well.

    I graduated from High School in 1974. In the mid-80's I went back to my High School with a 26 foot long box truck full of Electronics gear donated by a defense contractor I worked with to be used in that schools Electronics class. It was refused by the high school as electronics was not taught in the way it was when I was there.

    Children are no longer being exposed to the types of classes that generate an interest in the trades like they used to. I fell fortunate now that I was able to take the shop classes I did, the knowledge I gained there led me to where I am today.

    Here is a some tests I'd like to give to high school seniors graduating today.

    1) Hand them a California Job Case and ask them to identify it, or substitute a section of linotype and see if they know what it is.

    2) Hand them a non-working car stereo ( blown fuse ) and ask them to diagnose it.

    3) Hand them a Skew Chisel , Parting Chisel, and Bowl Gouge Chisel and aske them to identify each one.

    4) Take them into a garage and ask them to show you the Front End Alignment machine.

    Do kids need to know all of this? I don't know, but would it hurt if they did know?

    Public Shools SUCK today for what is NOT taught to children. All they frigging care about is teaching the kids to pass some assesment test so the school can qualify for more Federal money.

    FIX THE SCHOOLS - FIX THE PROBLEM

    <whew - I need a smoke and a beer> I don't smoke or drink!
    hate to say it but i agree ont his to my schools shop programs suck yes we have metal wood electronics drafting ag classes and a graphics shop class they are 4 quarters in length but they dont teach any form of the lost art that each subject has noone forge welds or hammers out sheet metal in metal shop nobody hand planes in wood shoop we dont set type in graphics when doing press work drafting we use autocad ag and electronics seem to be the only courses that you learn almost all forms of that trade.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oahu, Hawaii
    Posts
    2,469

    Default

    Hi guys,
    I'm 45 years old and have just started in welding. Did the computer 2 year Associate program at our Comm College, got almost straight A's, then wondered were all the "high paying jobs" were (Computers are the wave of the future, I HAVE to do that!!!). Hated to keep up with the technology for computers as fast as it's going (as I walked to the register with my 1st computer 5 years ago, the clerk jokingly said "you know that it's outdated now, don't you?". Then went back to school for the 2 year Associates welding program (yes, wife IS a sweetheart and the credit card people have us on their top 5 favs list) and ABSOLUTELY LOVE IT!!!! My classmates in computer are making $5/hr. LESSthan what I'm making now....

    I have a small gate project and my friends son (20 years old, had a baby that the girlfriend just left him, high school drop out, lives at home, no job is good enough for him, etc) asked me if I could teach him to weld. I teach Basic Welding part time for adult ed at the local High School so I said sure, meet me at 9am. Can't pay you, but I can teach you a lot. Said SURE, and didn't show up. Waste of my time waiting for him...Mom said he changed his mind, had however many beers and woke up late, telling her he would look for a job that paid. I wasn't going to tell him I was going to pay him $150 to install the gate the next time we worked together, I just wanted to see how his passion was to learn. I'm always offering my free labor to learn something I don't know...maybe I'm wrong....However, like my welding instructor told us: Schools don't like our shop, 'cause we cost them too much for material, machines, rods, etc. That's why they closed the machine shop 9 years ago (lathes and all the milling machines have rusted away at the state dumpyard)
    Cheaper to teach math and english: school buys chalk, we buy the books, paper and pencils... so much for my penny of thoughts for the youth of today.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oahu, Hawaii
    Posts
    2,469

    Default

    Oh, and for the other penny of my 2 cents: Don't worry about the "rich guys in the offices...." In the rich neighborhoods of where I live, there are $20,000 to $50,000 gates that adorn the front of those houses...I want to tap into that market!!! Also, when all these people who may snob us have their boat trailers break down, who do they come to?......

  6. #36
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    20

    Default

    This is a great thread, and all of you have really hit the mark. However, there are not many things that are tougher to change than a trend and this is one trend that will be tough to change. Back when I was in high school (mid 80's), my guidance councilor tried to steer me towards an engineering profession. I've always fixed my own cars, enjoyed working with tools and machinery, and really liked designing and building things from wood and metal. I used to tinker with my father's stick welder off and on and I still remember the look on my guidance councilorís his face when I told him I was thinking about becoming a welder. He told me I would be much better off in engineering. In the end, I went into engineering. Some days I'm happy with the decision I made and other days I really kick myself. I still tinker quite a bit with all kind of mechanical things and the welding is a hobby now. I think the tinkering makes me a better engineer. My son just turned 19 months old and he has not seen 15 minutes of television in his entire life. Our friends that also have children really give us a hard time about that. Their kids watch television about 4 hours a day so they (the parents) can have a break. I show those same friends my new welding cart that I'm working on and they say "what do you need that for?" I say to move my welder around and they just don't get it at all.

    One person that is really trying to make a difference is John Ratzenberger. He is most famous for playing Cliff Clavin on the TV show Cheers. Well, now he hosts a television show called Made in America where he visits companies that are manufacturing things in the United States. It's worth watching and it's just about the only TV I watch now. Even that is pretty rare. Mr. Ratzenberger shows some of the processes these companies use in manufacturing and talks with the craftsmen that actually make the products. Last week I was very excited to see an episode that was filmed at the L.S. Starrett Company in Massachusetts. Made in America is a great show that helps show the trades and blue collar workers in an entirely different light than they are usually seen. Perhaps more importantly, Mr. Ratzenberger is also involved with the nuts, bolts, and thingamajigs foundation. (http://www.nutsandboltsfoundation.org/) The foundation tries to get children interested in tinkering and the trades. I really do think this foundation is a great step in the right direction for the country and is worth supporting. Not just for welding, but for the trades and strength of our country in general.
    Last edited by tube_guy; 09-24-2007 at 02:08 PM.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Wartburg,Tn
    Posts
    575

    Default

    some one said there was no welding programs at most schools any more . Well thank goodness there is 1 at our High School ,but I`am like 1 of 4 kids who know how/ Want to weld ,some of the kids don`t even know what welding is

    Inferno Forge

    Chris

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ocean City, Maryland
    Posts
    951

    Thumbs up

    I just read this whole post again and realized it was an old one but good one. I have came to the conclusion whos fault all this is.....Ours! Parents! It doesnt matter what the teachers or our society says about things if WE raise our children in the way they should go they will not depart from it. So my simple thoughts are love em and kick some butt, make em work they'll learn something and make them spend time with you when they are small. After about 8-10 yrs old its to late. My neighbor once fussed with me because my 5 yr old was asleep on the roof of a new shop i was building. [He was between bundles of shingles so he couldnt go anywhere] But my point is make em work, At 5 he toted me shingles as i nailed them on, one at a time. At 17 now he has no fear to try anything and is successful at whatever he sets his mind too. Not afraid of work. Anything you can do to make them think and be creative not brain dead. I'm very blessed and dont mean to brag like proud dads do, but please TRY this at home

    Ps, dont let em fall off the roof
    pss, good for you wire burner, keep up the good work
    Scott
    HMW [Heavy Metal welding]

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Littlestown Pa.
    Posts
    30

    Smile

    well we got a new shop teacher end of my senior yr and he helped a good bit. but now im outta school and am a full time laborer,iron worker,welder,drafter haha.
    lincoln 140c
    with spool gun attachment

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Wartburg,Tn
    Posts
    575

    Default

    I just learned abuch of Blacksmithing today I went to a member of the Hobart boards shop & made a nail hanger thing

    Inferno Forge

    Chris

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