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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kansas City Missouri
    Posts
    84

    Default welding lathe casting

    I have recently come across an older lathe that has an upper corner of the casting broken off. Looking into the broken portion of the casting I can see the gears and internals. The piece that is broken off does not effect or have any relationship with the accurancy of the lathe. It is just the top corner portion of the casting. My question is if I attempt to weld the corner back on (it broke away very cleanly and fits perfectly back in place) will the added heat to the surrounding cast iron walls damage the gears or warp the area out. The thickness of the area that is broken off appears to be around 1/2 or more. Again it is not in a critical area of the lathe but I don't want to have weld material falling into the lathe gearing. I plan on grinding the weld off and contour the repaired corner to match the rest of the machine. I have not purchased the lathe yet, but if the repair could be done, I'll probably buy it. Your thoughts.......gear

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Central Al
    Posts
    8

    Default To seal out dust, chips,grim etc.

    Epoxy, when structrual integrity is not compremised. Sand smooth, paint to match and let 'er rip--turn.

  3. #3

    Default

    Try JB Cold Weld or the appropriate Devcon product.

    R W

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Posts
    304

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gearhead View Post
    ... The piece that is broken off does not effect or have any relationship with the accurancy of the lathe....
    Kinda depends on just how accurate you are wanting to be. I've run machines in the past that we had to let it "idle" for a while to make sure the gears and drives were up to operating temperatures. Otherwise the machine would "grow" by a thousandths or two during the turning. Just something to keep in mind. SSS

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kansas City Missouri
    Posts
    84

    Default

    SSS,


    I have heard about that growing process from other machinist. What would be better welding or epoxy? Gear

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Posts
    304

    Default

    If is just a "cosmetic" piece of the casting, then I would stray away from putting any extra stress of welding on the work, so I'd go with an epoxy or some other cold process. Also, once you get it set up, run the machine through its paces to make sure everything is still in spec. Of course, it again goes back to what you are going to be using it for and just how accurate you need the work to be. I have a friend that picked up an old lathe for one dedicated purpose. He hard surfaces round stock and his only requirement was that the chuck turned, and had a tail stock. Taper adjustments and steady/follow rests would have been in the way. All it does is rotate the stock in front of the gun. Now if you are cutting your own bearings, that's a little different accuracy story SSS

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Posts
    304

    Default

    just out of curiosity, what brand/size is it? SSS

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kansas City Missouri
    Posts
    84

    Default

    It's a Lodge and Shipley lathe, don't really know the overall size. When I first saw it, I was just kind of dumb struck. It was in very good shape and appeared to have little use (except where a fork lift spanked the casting). This machine is bigger than I can ever really use (maybe a 10 foot bed) but you know I'll probably buy it if the price is right. I have a thing for old machinery...gear

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Posts
    304

    Default

    Nothing wrong with old gear. I have stuff that is older than I am, and it gets worked almost everyday. One of the quirky things about the longer lathes is that you can get them pretty cheap sometimes. Mainly because there's a much smaller market for the longer ones. Most people are looking for 60 inchers and down, verses the big ones that take up so much floor space. I'm waiting to run across a good 20X80 with a gap bed. That has always been a good workhorse that will handle just about anything in a job shop. Anything bigger, I don't want to mess with in the first place. SSS

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Dallas, TX area
    Posts
    267

    Default my $.02

    I would at least tack it in place. If you're concerned about it growing, I suggest a good long preheat (I use an electric heat gun) and then tack it in three or four places, fill the cracks, countour and paint. Few things make me angrier than "fixing" something like that and have the piece fall out later when it gets smacked by something.
    Triggerman

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    "A professional knows what to do. A craftsman knows why."

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