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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    HARTBURG, TEXAS
    Posts
    3

    Cool Storing stick electrodes

    Being a home and farm owner I always have a supply of xx10,11's and xx18's and a few 308-316 stick ecltrodes on hand and need to find a economical way to store them and keep the moisture from them. Being on a limited income now makes the economical part important!! I have been coming to this site awhile and some pretty helpful folks here it seems!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Startford, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada
    Posts
    304

    Default

    Well at our school shop my teacher keeps his electrodes in what seemed to look like a drawer with a metal covering over it. You could always make something like the picture I have below. Easy enough to build or you could easly buy it without the worry of burning a hole in your pocket.(it really doesnt have to be the exat 3 extra doors but sometihng along the lines of that).
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Thanks for reading I hope my post helped

    Ryan

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    500

    Cool storage

    if the rods are 6010,7010,8010,9010,6011,316,309,308,dont put these in a rod oven however you must put the 7018 in a rod oven, you can pickup a small rod oven for about $60.00 or get a flood lite and keep them warm that way

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    642

    Default

    A friend of mine keeps his welding rod in an old chest type freezer, inside he has several lamps to keep it warm inside and hopefully dry as well.

    The freezer is of course well sealed.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Posts
    304

    Default

    I have small screw top sleeves that I keep a working supply in, but for bulk storage, I have a section of four (or was it six...don't remember) inch PVC pipe with a cap on one end and a clean out screw plug on the other. (don't try to take it on an airplane, it looks like something that would raise and eyebrow or two). I keep one for each type of rod I keep around. I think I built most of them from scrap I've picked up at jobsites. I've never tried it ,but I guess you could shove some packets of that silica drying agent in with 'em. Does anyone know if that stuff would have any adverse long term effects on the rods?

    Since you are on a farm, do you have some pipe laying around that you could weld a cap on one end and put a threaded cap on the other? Just a thought.

    SSS

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Posts
    304

    Default one other thought

    I use the PVC set ups because I can almost drive over them and not worry about any damage. If you want to go really cheap, and aren't too worried about structural integrity, rubbermaid and other companies make all sorts of watertight food storage containers. I'm sure one of those is plenty big enough to put some rods in.

    SSS

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Shattuck OK
    Posts
    47

    Default

    I store my rods in the freezer half of an old refrigerator. Seems to keep them dry and fresh, been doing it ever since 1982. I use the refrigerator half of it to store other supplies such as grinding wheels, chop saw wheels, and wire brushes. I also store my gloves and hood in the lower half. Hope this helps.

    Bryce
    BB Farm Supply

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    5

    Default Re:Storing Electrodes

    I use the Army surplus mortar shell tubes. They hold about 10# of rods and have an o-ring seal under the cap to keep out moisture. Most surplus stores have them. I have also used the old refrigerator with a 100 watt lamp inside.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Wheeling
    Posts
    169

    Default

    I would use the refrigerator method, but I want to make sure the Freon has been recovered properly.

    I do like the idea of the frig and would put a lock of some kind on it just for peace of mind.

    Jerry

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Dallas, TX area
    Posts
    267

    Default Here's what I did.

    It works great for me when I'm piddling around.

    I cut several pieces of 1-1/2" PVC ( I think I should have gone to 2").

    Put test caps in the end and filled with Gorilla glue because it is some tough stuff, but it foams. I purchased an 1-1/2" floor drain fitting and caps for the rod holders.

    I can switch them out for whatever rod I'm using and it keeps the rods standing up and a little easier to grab even while wearing gloves. When I'm done, I just cap it and it goes on the shelf. TADA!

    Any suggestions appreciated.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Triggerman

    Ammonia refrigeration tech
    Trailblazer 302 (yes, it's new)
    Millermatic 180 w/Autoset
    CST-250
    HF-15 High frequency
    XR15 w/Push-Pull Gun
    Victor O/A, DeWalt, North mask


    "A professional knows what to do. A craftsman knows why."

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