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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    Posts
    80

    Default

    Watching the online videos should really get him interested in learning to weld. I started watching recently and decided I "needed" new equipment and wanted to really improve my hobby skills. I watch many of the videos over and over trying to learn, just like taking a class. These forums with the abundance of projects questions and helpful advise are a real asset.

    I understand the "home schooled" and relocation, however is there a chance there is a local community college where he could take just a welding class?? Even if he doesn't complete the class he might get some good instruction. I know it all depends how long you stay in one place... or if you could stay behind a few weeks on the next move, if needed, to complete classes... If you know where and when the next move is, look ahead, get him setup for a class... Some of this might be a lot harder on your son than it is for you, accommodations can be made.

    I took my only welding class at the local College in the summer between my Junior and Senior year of High School...
    Glen
    Miller Dynasty 200DX - Millermatic 350P - Hypertherm Powermax 45
    For Sale! - Hobart Handler 150 - Miller EconoTwin HF

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    alaska
    Posts
    181

    Default

    Math, math, and more math. I went to a 2 year degree program in Anchorage and they do NDT (non destructive testing, x ray,,,etc) Anyway I noticed the kids were lacking in their math skills. I went as a 44 year old veteran on the GI bill and that was my perspective. The kids can weld but they dont know how to study or want to take shortcuts in their calculations. He needs to know math. Algebra, trig, and how to use a calculator. My opinion. He can do it.

  3. #13

    Default

    I appreciate everyone's responses! We are currently in North Eastern Colorado. At this time, we are not sure how long we will be in the area. There is rumor that leads us to believe we may be here for a few more months at least. We are going to be checking with the Agriculture/Shop teacher next week when the local schools resume. The community college is over an hour away from us and they would not take him (for insurance purposes, they said) at 15. We are looking for a fine balance between book smart and experience smart. As per our residential state's regulations, we must have both. We are looking into acquiring a used welding machine and some material for him to practice with. He is very interested in learning this skill and while he is so enthusiastic, we'd like to encourage and support him as much as we are able to. Finding equipment and materials for him to practice with is the easier of the two for us, whereas, locating relevant material for him to familiarize himself is a task for me (with absolutely zero knowledge in the area). We are continuing our search and hope to find some assistance within the local school's shop teacher. Again, thank you all for such wonderful advice. :-)

  4. #14

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by 11b View Post
    Math, math, and more math. I went to a 2 year degree program in Anchorage and they do NDT (non destructive testing, x ray,,,etc) Anyway I noticed the kids were lacking in their math skills. I went as a 44 year old veteran on the GI bill and that was my perspective. The kids can weld but they dont know how to study or want to take shortcuts in their calculations. He needs to know math. Algebra, trig, and how to use a calculator. My opinion. He can do it.
    We are definitely working on the Math. We realized that this would be a valuable skill (after speaking with many welders in our previous location). It will help keep him motivated in the area of Math, knowing that it will assist him in his chosen career path. It is a win/win situation for everyone.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    Posts
    80

    Default

    Sounds good! In looking for a machine to learn with I would seriously consider one of the multi-process units so he can learn TIG, MIG & Stick... Also consider the multi-voltage units so you can plug it in most anywhere.

    I would think something like the Miller Multimatic 200 TIG kit (#951586) would be perfect. It costs more, but is is US made, reliable, rugged, light, very portable and has everything he needs to practice with.... it's for his education, not a home hobby. http://www.millerwelds.com/products/...p?model=M00361
    Glen
    Miller Dynasty 200DX - Millermatic 350P - Hypertherm Powermax 45
    For Sale! - Hobart Handler 150 - Miller EconoTwin HF

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    3,150

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by WickedWillow View Post
    locating relevant material for him to familiarize himself is a task for me (with absolutely zero knowledge in the area). We are continuing our search and hope to find some assistance within the local school's shop teacher. Again, thank you all for such wonderful advice. :-)
    The welding universe is so much more than just burning stick with a buzzbox or engine drive...

    Whichever path you take...

    it is well worth your while to download the FREE PDF versions of the manuals that are available here

    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...pamphlets.html

    These contain the same material that is in their Student Pack...
    and is the same training material used by many community college and trade school programs..

    But the printed version is $100....
    who knows.. after reviewing the PDF's you may want to purchase the printed version with the calculators and posters....

    Miller Education Package - $100.00 - #211611
    "The Educational Instructors Package" - All-new Full-Color Books!
    • (5) Miller Reference Books
      • Topic 2: Welding Safety Book
      • Topic 3: Basic Electricity for Welding
      • Topic 6: Shielded Metal Arc Welding
      • Topic 7: Gas Tungsten Arc Welding
      • Topic 8: Gas Metal Arc WElding

    • (6) Posters
      • Safety Warning
      • Good weld / Bad weld poster
      • Welding Careers
      • Welding Positions
      • Welding Joints
      • MIG Processes

    • (3) Miller Calculators — Stick, MIG, and TIG


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    https://www.millerwelds.com/resources/tools/#training
    Last edited by H80N; 08-08-2014 at 06:52 PM.
    .

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  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,861

    Default

    I have 2 older text books you can have
    Welding Principles and Applications 3rd edition Jeffry Jeffus
    Welding Skills 2nd edition R.T. Miller

    Send me an address
    Ed@screamingbroccoli.com
    Ed Conley
    http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
    MM252
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    You can call me Bacchus

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    356

    Default

    WickedWillow,

    I wish you the best of luck with your son's endeavors.

    Like many of the members here, I agree with the need for math skills.
    I might add (for a later time) blueprint reading skills.

    As an aging baby boomer, I find I am caught in a mix of old-new technologies.

    Computer skills are a must in today's world but "old world hands-on" know-how is still very important.

    I have a friend from high school days (over 45 years ago) who is a master plumber
    and who still fixes my mistakes without saying much.

    He doesn't have cable TV (by choice) and doesn't go on the Internet (no computer),
    yet he still makes more than me (retired engineer) and we have fun together.

    I do some tig welding when he needs it so it works out well.

    My point is that the latest technology may not help in a "real world" situation.
    Good old "hands-on" experience will never die.

    I don't think if I have a clogged toilet that I can find a phone app to unclog it.

    The Yellow Pages are not extinct.

    Best of luck.

    PS - I was born in Denver and grew up in Aurora before the folks moved to Phila.
    Best memory was when we had a thunderstorm in the summer when I was 4 and we took our rafts and floats out into the streets to play as the water was 2 feet deep in our street and everyone moved their cars onto their lawns.
    Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, Miller Dynasty 350, Hypertherm 1000, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.:

    Call me the "Clouseau" of welding !

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Pahrump NV
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WickedWrenches View Post
    I believe the best way would be to just get a used welder and let him go to town on some scrap metal. He can read every book written about welding but until he actually puts hands on it and does it, its just fantasy land. Knowing in your head how to do it from reading books isn't the same as hands on experience. I thought I was the best welder in town after reading several "how to books" and online forums, then I got my first welder and found out I was sorely wrong.
    No truer words were ever spoken My friend

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    11

    Default Desparately needing help

    Aws has online course for welder inspectors but it broke down in subject like math safety metallurgy blueprint reading etc, aws.org

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