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Thread: Smooth welds??

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    st-eustache qc.canada
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    Default

    HTML Code:
     disagree with the smooth is always a bad thing comment. You can have a very good, structurally strong weld with it being smooth. Somewhere along the way the rumor got started that the only weld that's good is a stack of dimes.
    +1

  2. #12

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    Why don't you go on the web and look up practical welding t.v. and watch some videos.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    2

    Smile

    I'm no expert but your pic looks like you're moving too fast and not getting enough of the filler wire in the weld, i use a tapping motion when i TIG weld, tapping the wire into the heat while steadily moving forward and not just pushing the wire into it, I hope that makes sense and helps.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Western Pa.
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    220

    Default Smooth welds??

    Research the notch affect & study as it relates to and affects the Strength of steel.
    Personally I like a smoother weld. The only time I use stack of dime weld is on Alm. Where I want that look for appearance not strength.
    Just my opinion

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by MMW View Post
    Do you have a foot peddle or hand control? Just because the machine is set for 75 amps doesn't mean you are at 75 amps unless the control is full on.

    Try using thinner rods. 1/16 or even .035". This will allow you to use a little less heat & dab the rod into the leading edge of the puddle, don't just move it steady with the torch. I know everyone loves the look of stacked dimes it isn't always the best weld. Not saying it's bad, it's just that you can have a very good weld without it.

    Peddle control

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Oswego IL
    Posts
    639

    Default smooth weld......then submerged arc......

    Quote Originally Posted by gnforge View Post
    Research the notch affect & study as it relates to and affects the Strength of steel.
    Personally I like a smoother weld. The only time I use stack of dime weld is on Alm. Where I want that look for appearance not strength.
    Just my opinion
    I have seen muliple submerged arc welds on 2 inch thick booms carriages that are nearly smooth, seeing how these are xrayed, and use on crane carriages, it must be of sufficent strength, also i would be more worried about pentration, and undercutting, as this seems to be the main failure point.
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  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    98

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tryagn5:322378
    Quote Originally Posted by gnforge View Post
    Research the notch affect & study as it relates to and affects the Strength of steel.
    Personally I like a smoother weld. The only time I use stack of dime weld is on Alm. Where I want that look for appearance not strength.
    Just my opinion
    I have seen muliple submerged arc welds on 2 inch thick booms carriages that are nearly smooth, seeing how these are xrayed, and use on crane carriages, it must be of sufficent strength, also i would be more worried about pentration, and undercutting, as this seems to be the main failure point.
    Different process all together. If your tig welding and your welds are smoothe theres nothing wrong with that, there are tecniques that will give you those results. If youre tiggin and your welds are dark grey something is wrong in the equation. Speed, heat etc. Lots of variables.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    alaska
    Posts
    181

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    Smooth is not bad. Core shield 8 runs really smooth, and is used for structural applications. I would say from looking at the pics said welder just needs more practice to "see" what he is looking at. I pulse the peddle sometimes and sometimes not. Filler metal thickness of course has influence on your puddle also. As the late Vince said "perfect practice makes perfect"

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Oswego IL
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    639

    Default sub merged arc no tig....really?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gingerboy View Post
    Different process all together. If your tig welding and your welds are smoothe theres nothing wrong with that, there are tecniques that will give you those results. If youre tiggin and your welds are dark grey something is wrong in the equation. Speed, heat etc. Lots of variables.
    no kiddin submerged arc is different than tig!? Thats not my point, my point was the appearance of the weld vs strength.
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  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Milan Michigan
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    1,705

    Default

    MMW and Trygn5 are right, There is nothing wrong with smooth, Rippled welds are caused by peddle manipulation and dipping the filler rod.

    Smooth welds are caused by smooth even power, a steady hand and a steady feed of wire.

    The nice thing about a smooth welds are that it makes it easier to detect if you have any under cut at the edge of the weld.

    The nice thing about pulsing which will give you a rippled weld is that you get a little less heat input into the part, in some instances this is good and other times you want good heat input on say thick heavy weldments for good penetration.

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