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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    10

    Default Dynasty 200DX First start-up questions

    Hi-

    I bought a Dynasty 200DX w/tig runner and wireless foot control, and am just now starting it up for the first time. I haven't done any welding for about 20 years. I bought this to work on a car project, so I'll be welding sheet metal and relatively thin walled box tubing and circular tubing, mostly low carbon steel but also some 4130.

    Would appreciate your feedback on these questions:

    1) Just on turning the machine on, it is making a semi high-pitched buzz. Is this
    normal? I haven't started to weld yet. When I turn it off, it takes a few seconds for the buzzing to go away.

    2) I bought an accessory kit for the WP20 torch. It was the MAK-1S. Surprisingly hard to find on the internet. Nevertheless, I notice that the kit has the full assortment of gas lenses and collet bodies, but no alumina nozzles. I have done a bit of reading about the gas lenses, and understand that they help smooth out the otherwise turbulent gas flow coming out of the collet body. My question is, for the type of welding that I am doing and my experience level (fond memories from 20 years ago), do the experts on this forum think I will really notice any difference using these gas lenses as I am getting started? Or is this something that I would only come to appreciate after years of welding, or perhaps welding something more intricate? I am just wondering whether I need to go off and buy the nozzles for these, or just use the standard collets and nozzles I have for them for now.

    3) The gas flow gauge that came with the package doesn't have a very precise read-out for Argon. The increments are in tens. So I could probably eyeball 12.5, 15, and 17.5. I was reading in some other forums and books recommendations about using 12 cfm, or 14 cfm, etc. but should I really be concerned about this precision, or just set it to 15 for now and forget about it unless I start seeing porosity or other weld contamination type issues?


    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    21

    Default

    I can only advise with #2 and #3.

    #2)

    Not having welded in 20yrs and assuming this is your very first time using TIG process, your steadiness will [likely] not be what it needs to be. A gas lens will help you out because you will likely be [incorrectly] using a slightly longer arc length that what needs to be used; by keeping the argon flow laminar, you will be less likely to encounter shielding gas issues. Again, it all just depends how well you start off. If you don't use the right torch angle and arc length, say goodbye to your gas coverage and say hello to porosity and crud covering your tungsten and alumina cup with the resulting bubbling that causes the porosity. With standard alumina cups your tungsten stick out has to be very very short, which means you have to really twist your neck and contort your body at times to get a good view of the puddle if using the correct torch angle. If you are very limber and can do this easily----great, you'll need it. But with a gas lens you can stick the tungsten out a bit farther to get a good view of the puddle without having to get a kink in your neck. Right now as a beginner in TIG [assuming again], of utmost importance is your clear unobstructed view of the puddle so you can re-learn how to read it. A gas lens only helps, not hinders this.

    #3)

    for the most part you can set it around 15-20 if you are using a standard collet body and alumina cup size of about #6-#7. It depends on the joint configuration. A butt weld would probably be fine with 15CFH, and you could reduce it just a bit if doing an inside corner joint because the argon gets a bit trapped by the proximity of the metal. Vice versa for tubing or an open corner joint---there is no place for the argon to dam up against, therefore you might need just a tad more flow. The important thing for you right now is to not practice on any small square/round tubing or thing sheet metal. Do some 1/8" -3/16" flat plate and cut it up after welding it so you can see the penetration into the joint to assess your satisfaction with your progress. The puddle control and heat input manipulation will stick with you as you transition in to thinner materials and different joint configurations and curvatures.


    I know where you're coming from, trust me. I came into TIG welding for same exact reason as you: car project. Started 5 years ago, and still have a lot to learn on TIG welding. Get your welding beads consistent on larger pieces of flat plate in a variety of joint configurations and this will help you out tremendously on the parts you really wanna do, like sheet metal and chromoly tubing. Get the puddle width, height, and penetration consistent right now on your practice pieces (which is something I should have done more of in the beginning) by cutting them up and analyzing all three pieces of the puzzle, and it will all be much better on the parts you really need to have "shine".
    Last edited by OscarJr; 06-29-2014 at 07:22 PM.
    HTP Invertig221 D.V. Water-cooled
    Eastwood MIG175 w/spoolgun
    Eastwood Versacut40 Plasma cutter

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    11

    Default Dynasty 200DX First start-up questions

    1. The buzz you hear is normal. The power board in the machine makes this noise when figuring out the input power being delivered. Perfectly normal.
    2. I always use a gas lens for all TIG welding. I feel I can produce a better result rather then standard collets and nozzles. That's just me. I'm no slouch when it comes to welding but I have friends that can really kick my ass with just the standard nozzle and an air cooled torch!
    3. Gas flow for a TIG machine is very important because you have pre flow and post flow. If it's not regulated accurately you will waste or not have enough gas flow. The latter will burn up an air cooled torch or burn up the tungsten on a water cooled torch.

    My .02$

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    17

    Default

    #1 - mine does this, to the point that I also thought there was something wrong. Apparently it's OK and normal. Mine is running on 400V and sounds like a leaf caught in a fan - intermittent and like there's something wrong.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Thank you guys for your comments; all very helpful.

    I am turning 40 this month. Last tig welded when I was about 18-20, but I
    believe I am just as steady today as I was then, so this is not a big concern.
    At that time, the machine was already set up for me, and all I did was manipulate the torch and press on the pedal. I didn't know anything about setting up the machine. Now I have read substantially, and am better prepared to actually begin meaningful tig practice.

    Once I turned on the coolmate (today), the noise from it overwhelmed anything from the welder itself, so I could no longer hear any buzz. I went ahead and welded for the first time today with the machine I have had for 1.5 years sitting in my office (now in my workshop). I took two small pieces of 1/8" thick bar stock and butt welded them with a 3/32 tungsten, #7 nozzle, 15 cfm gas, and amps of 90, then 105, then 115. I'm going to post the photos in a separate thread, but am happy to say that at least I didn't stick the tungsten once! However, after the 115 amp pass, the tungsten tip is now contaminated. I'm not sure if that is due to amperage too high, or if I held it too close to the weld puddle.

    One more question. Is there any reason I should leave the coolmate running for more than a few seconds after I finish welding? I am not using high currents yet, or welding for very long duration.

    Steve

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sjorlin View Post
    One more question. Is there any reason I should leave the coolmate running for more than a few seconds after I finish welding? I am not using high currents yet, or welding for very long duration.

    Steve
    ONLY if that is the last weld of the day and you are turning everything off. I made the mistake of turning off my water cooler in the middle of a welding session because of the noise. Forgot to turn it on when I went back to welding. Luckily I didn't burn up the power cable as so many others have done. I was only welding at 60A for about 4 seconds at a time. Any longer and have a brand-new burned-up water/power lead.
    HTP Invertig221 D.V. Water-cooled
    Eastwood MIG175 w/spoolgun
    Eastwood Versacut40 Plasma cutter

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    11

    Default Dynasty 200DX First start-up questions

    Get into the habit of turning things on in one sequence (gas, water cooler, welding machine) and turning them off in the reverse order (welding machine, watercooler, gas). There is no need to turn anything off while you are welding. Leave everything on from start to finish. It's a good habit and practice.

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