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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    northern NJ
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    1,856

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    Don't forget that new engine drives do not come with leads. Cables, clamp & stinger can be quite a sticker shock if you are a newbie. Figure about 125 -150 feet of cable total to start at $2 to $3 a foot plus ends & quick connects.
    MM250
    Trailblazer 250g
    22a feeder
    Lincoln ac/dc 225
    Victor O/A
    MM200 black face
    Whitney 30 ton hydraulic punch
    Lown 1/8x 36" power roller
    Arco roto-phase model M
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    Miller spectrum 875
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    Syncrowave 250
    RCCS-14

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    29

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    Quote Originally Posted by MMW View Post
    Don't forget that new engine drives do not come with leads. Cables, clamp & stinger can be quite a sticker shock if you are a newbie. Figure about 125 -150 feet of cable total to start at $2 to $3 a foot plus ends & quick connects.
    Thanks MMW,
    I have 100' of for pos. and 100' for ground already. Clamps as well.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bossier Parish La.
    Posts
    549

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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfTaught View Post
    Thanks MMW,
    I have 100' of for pos. and 100' for ground already. Clamps as well.
    What wire size is it? On my BC 225 I have 2/0 leads, because it is rated for 200 amps, almost the full rated output of my machine. You don't want leads being the limiting factor on what you can weld. So make sure they are sized accordingly.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bistineau View Post
    What wire size is it? On my BC 225 I have 2/0 leads, because it is rated for 200 amps, almost the full rated output of my machine. You don't want leads being the limiting factor on what you can weld. So make sure they are sized accordingly.
    Bistineau,
    They are 2/0. I see you have the BC 225. Do you feel "limited" in what you can do with it?
    Have you tried out the newer models? As I stated before, I believe now there is only a 500 watt difference in the gennie output of it and the BC250. There used to be a 2000watt difference. I can get the the 225 for about 3400 or the 250 for around 3800. The 400 dollar difference could help me get a spool gun for aluminium.
    Thanks

  5. #65
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bossier Parish La.
    Posts
    549

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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfTaught View Post
    Bistineau,
    They are 2/0. I see you have the BC 225. Do you feel "limited" in what you can do with it?
    Have you tried out the newer models? As I stated before, I believe now there is only a 500 watt difference in the gennie output of it and the BC250. There used to be a 2000watt difference. I can get the the 225 for about 3400 or the 250 for around 3800. The 400 dollar difference could help me get a spool gun for aluminium.
    Thanks
    No, I don't feel limited at all with my rig. I have successfully welded everything I have used it on, from 11 gage up to 1/2" material. No failed or broken welds on anything. I don't use mine to put food on the table or pay the bills either though. I have it to make the things I want/need the way I want them done.
    There is a newer model at work I have used and didn't really notice any difference in how it welds VS. mine. But since you mentioned it, I believe the auxiliary output on it is 9500 watts, and it is a 225 NT. Remember, you will need the contactor box to use a spool gun with the BC, where you would NOT need it with a Trail Blazer.
    When I use it to power my MM140 I connect it to the 240 outlet to get the power I need to use it. It doesn't run right when connected to the 120 20A outlets for some reason. I made a double duplex outlet box with the male end to plug into the 240 V outlet, it uses one leg of the 240V to get the 120V for the MM140.
    Did you check out the link I included in post #44? You can find LOTS of useful info there. Good site. Some of the members on here are over there too. WAY more activity on that site as well.
    Last edited by Bistineau; 03-02-2014 at 01:10 PM.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    At the epicenter of the Green Mountain Range in VT
    Posts
    311

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bistineau View Post
    No, I don't feel limited at all with my rig. I have successfully welded everything I have used it on, from 11 gage up to 1/2" material. No failed or broken welds on anything. I don't use mine to put food on the table or pay the bills either though. I have it to make the things I want/need the way I want them done.
    There is a newer model at work I have used and didn't really notice any difference in how it welds VS. mine. But since you mentioned it, I believe the auxiliary output on it is 9500 watts, and it is a 225 NT. Remember, you will need the contactor box to use a spool gun with the BC, where you would NOT need it with a Trail Blazer.
    When I use it to power my MM140 I connect it to the 240 outlet to get the power I need to use it. It doesn't run right when connected to the 120 20A outlets for some reason. I made a double duplex outlet box with the male end to plug into the 240 V outlet, it uses one leg of the 240V to get the 120V for the MM140.
    Did you check out the link I included in post #44? You can find LOTS of useful info there. Good site. Some of the members on here are over there too. WAY more activity on that site as well.
    Years ago I bought a used Honda generator, checked output voltage, it was good. I plugged it into the house, and let it run a while. Suddenly the dining table light got too bright! I ran like **** to unplug. A loose connection on the neutral at the NEMA L14-30 receptacle meant imbalanced split of the 240. I lost some bulbs and a microwave, it could have been worse!

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    At the epicenter of the Green Mountain Range in VT
    Posts
    311

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bistineau View Post
    No, I don't feel limited at all with my rig. I have successfully welded everything I have used it on, from 11 gage up to 1/2" material. No failed or broken welds on anything. I don't use mine to put food on the table or pay the bills either though. I have it to make the things I want/need the way I want them done.
    There is a newer model at work I have used and didn't really notice any difference in how it welds VS. mine. But since you mentioned it, I believe the auxiliary output on it is 9500 watts, and it is a 225 NT. Remember, you will need the contactor box to use a spool gun with the BC, where you would NOT need it with a Trail Blazer.
    When I use it to power my MM140 I connect it to the 240 outlet to get the power I need to use it. It doesn't run right when connected to the 120 20A outlets for some reason. I made a double duplex outlet box with the male end to plug into the 240 V outlet, it uses one leg of the 240V to get the 120V for the MM140.
    Did you check out the link I included in post #44? You can find LOTS of useful info there. Good site. Some of the members on here are over there too. WAY more activity on that site as well.
    Years ago I bought a used Honda generator, checked output voltage, it was good. I plugged it into the house, and let it run a while. Suddenly the dining table light got too bright! I ran like **** to unplug. A loose connection on the neutral at the NEMA L14-30 receptacle meant imbalanced split of the 240. I lost some bulbs and a microwave, it could have been worse!

    I answered an ad for a Bobcat 225, when I went to get it it proved to be a 250. Looking at specifications they are close, does it appear to you that they share the same engines? It isn't clear to me why they build two machines so similar.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bossier Parish La.
    Posts
    549

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    From what I can tell from current info on these two machines, they are running the same engines. Either Kohler or Subaru, 23HP 3600 RPM, 9500 running watts of power for both, 11,000 peak output. The BC 250 with EFI has an additional 1,000 watts of power over the other two.
    I believe maybe for selftaught's purposes, a Trail Blazer 325 would be a good consideration to look at, if he can handle the extra price of it. This would allow extra flexibility in the future when adding other processes to his bag of welding options, without needing to add as much in converter boxes and such. He won't be needing to upgrade from a BC later to be able to expand on welding capabilities either. Although 14 pin connectors can be added to BCs. It just takes a little bit of technical savy to do it, just ask DuanneB55 on here, he has done it on his BC 225. So it can be done, might need to send him a PM if wanting to possibly add a 14 pin connector to a BC.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    At the epicenter of the Green Mountain Range in VT
    Posts
    311

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    A 3/4 and one ton Chevy van are identical except the springs, yet the cost difference is staggering. They don't build different vehicles because it is cheaper to build 100000 of one than 50000 each of different models.
    I have to think similar thinking is applied to Bobcat welders, they have many parts in common wherein lies the difference? It seems unlikely they will build two different generators so similar.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    At the epicenter of the Green Mountain Range in VT
    Posts
    311

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    Quote Originally Posted by MMW View Post
    Don't forget that new engine drives do not come with leads. Cables, clamp & stinger can be quite a sticker shock if you are a newbie. Figure about 125 -150 feet of cable total to start at $2 to $3 a foot plus ends & quick connects.
    Welding is only a portion of my income, getting the job done requires versatility. At income tax time I have to add it up. I'm always startled at the money spent on tools! It isn't safe to think of the cost of buying a welder. You must estimate the cost of the support equipment needed to make it work. A 3000 Dollar welder costs 4500 dollars to use, before you buy fuel, electrodes, gas (shielding or fuel) Then there is electricity. Are you going to drive to the customer? Vehicle costs must be factored. Will you have a facility? Rent, insurance, license, utilities, depreciation must be considered. I get frustrated with customers who want to compensate me for rod. Huh? What about other expenses? Oh! you hoped I wouldn't know about them. Why wouldn't I know about them, they are real bills, I have to pay them!

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