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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Mpls, MN
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    1,790

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    There's a reason they call it black malleable iron. It's designed to give rather than resist and possibly rupture when impacted. Terrible choice for structural work. That's not to say it isn't possible to be made to work if designed well enough, but there are far better options.
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  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fishy Jim View Post
    There's a reason they call it black malleable iron. It's designed to give rather than resist and possibly rupture when impacted. Terrible choice for structural work. That's not to say it isn't possible to be made to work if designed well enough, but there are far better options.



    That's just bad information all the way around, I can't let that one pass by because somebody might actually believe it.

    "Black malleable iron", really?
    Malleable iron is pretty simple, it's a white cast iron that's been heat treated to a little less brittle state than normal cast iron. It's used in sewer/drain/sometimes cold water/ sometimes low pressure water-in fittings & piping today, but used to be popular for water feed lines in buildings. Malleable iron is very un malleable, it's better than normal cast iron but that isn't saying a lot. It was state of the art in what? 1885? Still used in some applications cause it's so cheap.
    Malleable is very problematic to weld because the consumables are uber expensive (high nickle cast rods, go price 'em) and when you're done the iron is no longer "malleable". It's in a practical production sense, unweldable material. In a "need to make a repair NOW" sense a very expensive material to weld.

    He ask about 3/4" black natural gas pipe. That'll be, in America, usually a A53 Grade B or API X42 Gr B or dual or triple cert (A53, API X42/X46, A106) pipe. the pipe mills save a lot by rolling multi spec pipe. Very similar to the material used in structural steel, very very weldable, very mild steel.

    I'd never make a car ramp with 3/4" A53 pipe, but that's me. My "cars" weigh quite a bit. I wouldn't even make a motorcycle ramp out of it, given a choice.

    But it's a miracle if he scrapped malleable iron gas piping out of a house.

    J
    Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

  3. #33

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    I should add that pipe of all grades from the common A53/API42 up into the stratospheric grades are spec'd every day in structural applications by engineers. And welded with happiness.

    J
    Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bossier Parish La.
    Posts
    550

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    [QUOTE=

    I'd never make a car ramp with 3/4" A53 pipe, but that's me. My "cars" weigh quite a bit. I wouldn't even make a motorcycle ramp out of it, given a choice.

    J[/QUOTE]

    That's why I have been checking back on this thread, to see if the guy ever made these ramps and if they actually held up. Maybe someone in the future may be able to use the info of if it worked or not. I gave my recommendation as to what he should do for ramps for this purpose.

    Bob61 was last on here today at 2:21 PM, and hasn't said a word about this thread yet. What about it Bob?.Did you decide against doing this or not? Did it work, did it fail, what's the story
    Last edited by Bistineau; 01-23-2014 at 06:13 PM.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    8

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    Quote Originally Posted by JTMcC View Post
    That's just bad information all the way around, I can't let that one pass by because somebody might actually believe it.

    "Black malleable iron", really?
    Malleable iron is pretty simple, it's a white cast iron that's been heat treated to a little less brittle state than normal cast iron. It's used in sewer/drain/sometimes cold water/ sometimes low pressure water-in fittings & piping today, but used to be popular for water feed lines in buildings. Malleable iron is very un malleable, it's better than normal cast iron but that isn't saying a lot. It was state of the art in what? 1885? Still used in some applications cause it's so cheap.
    Malleable is very problematic to weld because the consumables are uber expensive (high nickle cast rods, go price 'em) and when you're done the iron is no longer "malleable". It's in a practical production sense, unweldable material. In a "need to make a repair NOW" sense a very expensive material to weld.

    He ask about 3/4" black natural gas pipe. That'll be, in America, usually a A53 Grade B or API X42 Gr B or dual or triple cert (A53, API X42/X46, A106) pipe. the pipe mills save a lot by rolling multi spec pipe. Very similar to the material used in structural steel, very very weldable, very mild steel.

    I'd never make a car ramp with 3/4" A53 pipe, but that's me. My "cars" weigh quite a bit. I wouldn't even make a motorcycle ramp out of it, given a choice.

    But it's a miracle if he scrapped malleable iron gas piping out of a house.

    J
    Thanks for taking the time to share your expertise on this JTMcC. Good information.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bistineau View Post
    That's why I have been checking back on this thread, to see if the guy ever made these ramps and if they actually held up. Maybe someone in the future may be able to use the info of if it worked or not. I gave my recommendation as to what he should do for ramps for this purpose.

    Bob61 was last on here today at 2:21 PM, and hasn't said a word about this thread yet. What about it Bob?.Did you decide against doing this or not? Did it work, did it fail, what's the story
    Thanks Bistineau, for keeping an eye on this. Here's the scoop...the ramps slid down the list of priorities for the time being...that's a good thing though as it looks like the evidence and opinions of the pros on this site is mounting up to say it is a waste of time and otherwise useful material. I haven't given up on the ramps, but will likely use something else when I get the time to build them.

    Thanks again to everyone who posted with ideas and comments...much appreciated.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bossier Parish La.
    Posts
    550

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    I appreciate the update. It took you awhile to respond.

    If you were local to me, I would come help you build what I suggested if you were favorable to it. I'm not sure why you would be opposed to building the ramp I mentioned.

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