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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Front Royal, Va
    Posts
    64

    Default Frozen 1-1/16" cylinder pin..

    Hey guy's, i just wanted to share what i ran into yesterday at work. I have been tasked to bring an older Fink 11' variable mole board snow plow back into service. This plow has two 3" X 24" cylinders one on each side to turn the plow. One of the cylinder pins were frozen into a blind boss. It has a flange welded on top of the pin and is held in place with a 3/8" bolt. I sprayed everything with hilti lube and removed the bolt. I then used a 3lb hand sledge and hit the head of the pin several times. I placed a 4' pipe wrench on the flange top and tried to twist the pin and nothing moved. The cylinder would slide up and down on the pin so it was frozen in the boss on the bottom. i used a digging bar and waked the flange 10 or so times trying to turn it some and nothing moved. I then resorted to oxy/acc torch to place some heat on the boss area but i lacked a rose bud tip. I was able to heat the boss on each side and then tried to turn the pin again with the pipe wrench and a 4' extension nothing moved. Sure would be easier if the pin was all the way thru to the bottom for better access. I then decided that if i could use my 3/4" drive air impact to get the pin to turn a little it might just work. I was hesitant because the pipe wrench wouldn't move it. I cleaned the top of the pin and flange welded a 1 3/8" nut to the top of the flange. I placed most of the weld int the nut on top of the flange and a single pass around tthe outside of the nut. MM 211 with regular mild steel wire voltage all the way up and wire speed at 90 i think. I let it cool for 3 0r 4 minutes and 5 seconds of torque with the 3/4" impact and it was free. Man i was happy because my boss was going to hire a machine co. to get it out. Wish i had picts to show. From now on i will weld a nut on when i can and save a lot of time and frustration.....Just thought i would share....... Maybe more ideas out there on removal also.......
    HH 210MVP
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Milan Michigan
    Posts
    1,721

    Default

    Glad to hear you got it out.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Front Royal, Va
    Posts
    64

    Default

    Thanks Portable welder. Guess no one else was interested in sharing their experiences.
    HH 210MVP
    Spoolrunner 100
    Powercraft AC buzz box
    Lotas LTP5000D plasma
    Victor Oxy/Acet
    30 ton press
    A few brand name tools
    Lots of no name tools
    A wife to worry me
    and 4 dogs to supervise me

  4. #4

    Default

    I am the most inexperienced TIG hand You will ever meet. I have a 95 Villager that broke about 10 exhaust studs off in the head. Known poor quality studs. Pulled the motor and removed them all with the TIG using a flat washer and nut welded on. Some holes took 3 or 4 tries. Had 3 or 4 more broken bolts to remove from removing the engine, got them all. Almost used up my stock of nasty nuts that won't work anywhere else.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Front Royal, Va
    Posts
    64

    Default

    Awesome. manifold bolts can be a pain.
    HH 210MVP
    Spoolrunner 100
    Powercraft AC buzz box
    Lotas LTP5000D plasma
    Victor Oxy/Acet
    30 ton press
    A few brand name tools
    Lots of no name tools
    A wife to worry me
    and 4 dogs to supervise me

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    northern NJ
    Posts
    1,853

    Default

    Even if I don't log in & reply I do read almost everything on here.

    I am glad you posted as I never would of thought of it. Just add it to my memory for future reference, thank you.
    MM250
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Wa
    Posts
    577

    Default

    My friend stripped a brand new head bolt on his firebird, I welded a 3/4 bolt to it and we got it right out. I love using that trick.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Cantonment, FL
    Posts
    46

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mcostello View Post
    I am the most inexperienced TIG hand You will ever meet. I have a 95 Villager that broke about 10 exhaust studs off in the head. Known poor quality studs. Pulled the motor and removed them all with the TIG using a flat washer and nut welded on. Some holes took 3 or 4 tries. Had 3 or 4 more broken bolts to remove from removing the engine, got them all. Almost used up my stock of nasty nuts that won't work anywhere else.
    What is the purpose of the washer?? I have only recently started to learn to weld and purchased a welder so I have never before been able to use this process (welding a nut on) to remove a stuck pin or broken bolt, etc. I have heard of it and seen it done, but not with a washer.Thanks in advance,Mike

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    399

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mbramble View Post
    What is the purpose of the washer?? I have only recently started to learn to weld and purchased a welder so I have never before been able to use this process (welding a nut on) to remove a stuck pin or broken bolt, etc. I have heard of it and seen it done, but not with a washer.Thanks in advance,Mike
    The washer helps contain your arc so you don't weld the broken stud to the sides of the threaded hole. Also protects the surrounding surface from spatter.---Meltedmetal

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Cantonment, FL
    Posts
    46

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Meltedmetal View Post
    The washer helps contain your arc so you don't weld the broken stud to the sides of the threaded hole. Also protects the surrounding surface from spatter.---Meltedmetal
    Ahhhh, makes perfect sense!! Thanks much, I will keep this in mind for future reference.

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