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Thread: hammers

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    North Central Indiana
    Posts
    782

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jpence38 View Post
    These are the only hammers that I would buy. A little more pricy, but will last longer than me.

    http://www.estwing.com/specialty_tools.php
    I can't disagree with your choice, but I have a hobby shop budget which tends to cause me to compromise on certain tools.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    not near you
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    146

    Default Steel handle hammers

    Take some advice from and old guy......Estwing and similar steel shank hammers are hard on your arm and wrist...When used daily over a period of years...They are a tough hammer and will last for years but the shock of hammering is transferred directly to the arm that is holding it...Wooden handles are much easier on the user...Your mileage may vary.....

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    187

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Precision View Post
    I love me some Estwing hammers.
    I've got several Estwing hammers. I prefer them over any of my others. The Estwings that I have use a molded semi-soft material for the handles. I have a five pound Estwing that is my "go to" hammer when I really need to whack something. I bought it in 1971 at a Hardware store in L.A. and it's still going strong.

    Bayweld says that they transfer shock to your arm....If you are using a hammer and you can't feel the shock, there is something wrong. LOL.
    Last edited by Synchroman; 08-25-2013 at 08:10 AM.
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  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    East Tenn
    Posts
    148

    Default hammers

    I agree with his point about shock transfer with a solid steel vs. wooden handle. BUT, I always end up hitting the handle on something and gouge it then one day I'll hit the sharts outta something and it will break and usually hit my shin. Since I'm lazy and don't like to shape new handles for my mur I stay with the estwings. Have the 16oz stacked leather,20 oz framer, 2lb engineer , ball peen and the chipping hammer. Have the camp axe too. Guess I'm an Estwing *****. ;-)

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bayweld View Post
    Take some advice from and old guy......Estwing and similar steel shank hammers are hard on your arm and wrist...When used daily over a period of years...They are a tough hammer and will last for years but the shock of hammering is transferred directly to the arm that is holding it...Wooden handles are much easier on the user...Your mileage may vary.....
    Bayweld is right wooden handels are the ones to use,some years ago I used a 4lb hammer with a fiberglass handle to upset four 1" sq. A36 bars on the anvil for a table,my elbow ached for several years after that aftenoon of hammering.All my hammers are now hickory.I realize most of you guys/gals don't use hammers to the degree as a blacksmith,but if your using steel or fiberglass handles because your afraid of missing your mark and breaking the handle your hammers are probably not being used much anyway.Probably using one of those big red hand protectors to hold a chisel too.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    East Tenn
    Posts
    148

    Default hammers

    Big red hand protectors,on a chisel, never!!! If I were a blacksmith bangin on an anvil all day you bet your sweet arse I'm using wood, but I don't. Driven many a 16d framin houses and 8d on deck boards before nail guns were even the norm. I just like my Estwing boss.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Hermiston Oregon
    Posts
    248

    Default

    Owned many wooden hammers before buying a estwing ball peen. Its the best hammer I've owned hands down
    .
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  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Cave Creek Az
    Posts
    990

    Default

    I don't have a preference of brand, and in fact most of my hammers come my way because they have no handles. I had a job some time back that needed a bunch of hickory cut up. This left me with many feet of hammer handle sized pieces. Since then I have taken to shaping my own handles.
    I also was at a blacksmith workshop a while back with the Brazeal brothers, and learned how to make my own hammers. That hammer I made has become my go to hammer in the smithy. It taught me some important things about balance as well as handle length and shape.
    I would put any of my hammers up against anyone else's hammer of same head design/weight and feel I would come out on top. Once you figure out how to make a handle that suits you perfectly, you can hit much harder and more accurately.
    Last edited by walker; 08-25-2013 at 05:24 PM.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    seaford de
    Posts
    406

    Default

    Im surprised nobody even mentioned nupla hammers, i just saw a nice metalworkers set of hammers made by nupla in the new msc metalworkers paper. i always thought of estwing as a woodworkers hammer.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    East Tenn
    Posts
    148

    Default hammers

    You are indeed correct sir.

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