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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Salem ,Ohio
    Posts
    3,899

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by Hardrock40 View Post
    .

    There is no way a trailer manufacture would carry a vehicle on horizontal 1/8th wall tubing. But who knows.
    There are lots of car haulers made from 2x3x1/8" and 2x4x1/8" tube. Those are the cheapy ones that made my dad end his trailer business because we weren't going to cheapen our design to compete with them...Bob
    Bob Wright, Grandson of Tee Nee Boat Trailer Founder
    Metal Master Fab Salem, Oh 44460
    Birthplace of the Silver & Deming Drill
    1999 MM185 w/185 Spoolgun,1986 Thunderbolt AC/DC
    Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Front Royal, Va
    Posts
    64

    Default

    Looks like you could grind it out, weld it up and grind the welds down. Lay a piece of 3/16" 2X3" angle on each side and weld them up with short beads being careful to stagger from one side to the other to avoid to much heat being placed into the base metal. Don't want to weaken the tubing outside of the cracked area. This would help with the torsional effects it might see.
    About the risks with welding this, i think you could have risks with almost everything you weld to a point but in this case a half dozen cars and the public being at risk from a failure could be a huge liability case. But the hand rail i fabricated/welded and installed on a 2 story deck could also be a case for the courts. The mud flap mount that i welded on a truck could come off and strike another vehicle or cause an accident hence another case for a liability suite. Im not sure you can be 100% safe but drawing the line as to what you do may help....Just saying.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    570

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JTMcC View Post
    There's two major mistakes in that simple statement.

    Don't assume a car hauler will ever see a proper repair. I've took a lot of pictures of the repairs on them over the years (including cars dropped down on top of other cars and trailer structural pieces jammed into cars) and never yet seen one that was done right. I'm sure they are out there but never laid eyes on it yet.

    # two is the "5 times stronger". If you make a free standing "something" 5X stronger it was either very poorly designed in the first place, or you've just spent way to much customer money.
    If it's not a free standing item, ie part of a system like a car hauler member is, then you've just built in (at least) two obvious points of failure.
    Even a well welded repair of one point on a light structural member if, it's not designed, will ultimately result in multiple failures in the rest of the member or in it's connection points/adjacent members.

    None of it matters if your welding on dirt equipment, but 80 mph down the freeway is dangerous territory for welding work.

    If this annoys you you can put me on "ignore", I think, and not see my rambling posts. But every one of them comes from direct observation or personal experience.
    I don't want to see anybody loose everything they've worked for over a property damage claim or worse yet a personal injury claim. But I have. And some of them deserved it based on the damage that resulted from their work, sometimes years later.

    J, ignore my comments, I understand, they aren't what you want to hear. Others will soon tell you just what you do want to hear.
    Ignore you? no way. I might not like every single word everybody types in here but I come here to read and ask. You would be the last I would want to ignore.

    I've been welding since the mid 80's. Mostly the same old crap. I have not been out on jobs to gain experience on everything that comes up but I have learned a lot more in the last 4 years with my new will to make it.

    When I said 5X's stronger, that was figure of speech so to say. If anybody repairs it with any decent method I just think it will be better than any other part of that whole tube. But like you say another failure point might be born.

    It is gone never to return, one of you guys may see it as it runs from LA to Atlanta on a regular route, so I was told.

    I think it was bob in a post after yours that said he has seen too many made from the same type of tubing. Good grief, I'm glad I didn't have anything to do with it.

    I probably sound like I'll do anything for a buck, not really, I turned down a hitch to be put on the back of a fifth wheel to pull another trailer.

    Then another make shift hitch after that one.

    Now a jeep where the stabilizer and steering linkage both connect to the frame, cracked three times already. I will look at it because I know the guy and the Jeep is used off road but he drives to these mud bogs on the road.

    Maybe weeks away but I'll take pics and see what non welding options you guys might come up with. I'm thinking a sturdy bracket bolted to the frame. Maybe a fish plate on the frame then bolt thru all or maybe nothing for me to deal with.

    Anyway, I'll not ever look for the ignore setting on anybody.
    You guys are a wealth of knowledge.
    Thanks

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    570

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fireman View Post
    Im not sure you can be 100% safe but drawing the line as to what you do may help....Just saying.
    Makes me wonder if you could just take cash and act like our government " I know nothing about that"

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    570

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aametalmaster View Post
    There are lots of car haulers made from 2x3x1/8" and 2x4x1/8" tube. Those are the cheapy ones that made my dad end his trailer business because we weren't going to cheapen our design to compete with them...Bob
    Wish I hadn't seen that. Now I'll be driving like Batman trying to get away from them on the highway.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Northern CA, Shasta CO.
    Posts
    146

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardrock40 View Post
    Wish I hadn't seen that. Now I'll be driving like Batman trying to get away from them on the highway.
    I can stand being behind, alongside or anywhere around one on the freeway. If I can't get around and way ahead I'll back way off. They remind me of those experimental bridges made from Popsicle sticks and tooth picks. Ready to completely collapse at any moment.

  7. #17

    Default

    I have to agree with Sandy, leave me a-lots of space on the freeway when the car haulers are around. Specially when they are going around curves (side to side sway) and hitting the humps (up and down humpiness), watch them and you'll see it.

    Just based on looking at too many of them. They are designed very lightweight to maximize $ cargo $ capacity $. They live a relatively short lifespan because of that. Owners run them well past that usable life.

    You'd think the dirt/rock hauler end dumps and transfers would be the low end in trucking world but they are far ahead of the car haulers based on my observation. That's antecdotal I know, but still, I steer clear of them in the truck or the Yukon, stay way, way away on a motorsickle. It's like following a plumbers flatbed, something just might fall off.

    I still haven't seen one I was willing to weld on, they are the dominoe effect in real time. I hate being a falling dominoe. If there's anything that will haunt you in welderland, it's a used/previously repaired car hauling trailer. My opinion only.

    We've put on a lot of underwheel lifts on big truck wreckers in the '90's'00's, and stretched and shortened many big truck frames, I'll do almost anything for money. The only hauler I'd work on is a relatively new one with minor damage.

    Everbody else can do whatever they want of course.

    J
    Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Lodi, CA
    Posts
    1,257

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JTMcC View Post
    Everbody else can do whatever they want of course.

    J
    Unfortunately for all of us that have to share the road, there's always somebody willing to make a quick buck.
    Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Milan Michigan
    Posts
    1,697

    Default

    I would'nt have any problem repairing that and have been working on things like that for about 28 years.

    Fireman suggested stitch welding and thats the wrong answer, You want to repair the crack, Grind it flush and if the tube is 2" tall x 4" across, x 1/8" thick I would put a 3/8" thick x 4" wide plate across the bottom x However long the damaged area is approx. 8" long and fully weld it so water cannot get in between the plates and start rusting.
    I would cut the ears loose on the cylinder, put a plate on the top and fully weld it and then reweld the ears back onto the plate.
    __________________________________________________ __________________

    Keep in mind, I have been putting hitches on trucks forever, everything from a pick up truck to Gravel trains.
    __________________________________________________ __________________

    I draw the line however when it comes to hitches on cars, Not enouph frame for me.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    570

    Default

    The trailers that scare me the most are the lumber haulers. I don't like all those cars swaying around but when you pull along side a 18 wheeler loaded with lumber and see the trailer flexing like a spring its time to hit the gas.

    I know they are designed to flex to prevent them from breaking but you see the weight of the load and know its a heavy beast.

    Luckily I was a ways back from one that blew a tire one day, there was crap flying everywhere all over the highway. BIG pieces that would do some serious damage.

    The comment about the plumbers truck and something falling off is too funny and true. Been there. I hate the roofers trailers loaded with torn off shingles and raining nails.

    Nothing like trying to pass a big dozer being hauled with dirt clods falling off and so hard they would bounce. I hit the passing lane and kicked it only to have one fly off the side, with a quick swerve it missed but took another 100 yards to get back in control of the car.

    Back to welding, my cuz who is a foreman over a pipe crew is all about NASCAR. He went on some kind of tour through one of the teams shop. I almost didn't believe him but he said the welds on the cars look like sheet. He couldn't believe it himself. I would like to see for myself.

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