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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Cave Creek Az
    Posts
    1,009

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    A tig machine is likely the worst possible choice you could make at this juncture. You are a novice welder, and TIG is a somewhat advanced skill.
    SO lets solve your MIG issue before throwing you into the pit of boiling oil which is what tig would be like initially.
    First off I would post a picture of what you are trying to weld, along with what machine you are using, what gas is in your bottle (just post what it says on the label), what CFM your gas is flowing at, and what you are welding, what wire is in your machine (again, just post the label details eg; er70s-6, etc), and what settings you are using.
    I have a feeling that you are either trying to weld thin galvanized sheet, or possibly aluminum. First see if a magnet sticks to it, a picture should show the rest.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    10

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    Quote Originally Posted by walker View Post
    A tig machine is likely the worst possible choice you could make at this juncture. You are a novice welder, and TIG is a somewhat advanced skill.
    SO lets solve your MIG issue before throwing you into the pit of boiling oil which is what tig would be like initially.
    First off I would post a picture of what you are trying to weld, along with what machine you are using, what gas is in your bottle (just post what it says on the label), what CFM your gas is flowing at, and what you are welding, what wire is in your machine (again, just post the label details eg; er70s-6, etc), and what settings you are using.
    I have a feeling that you are either trying to weld thin galvanized sheet, or possibly aluminum. First see if a magnet sticks to it, a picture should show the rest.



    Hobart 125 C25 Gas .024 steel wire gas flowing at 15- tried higher and lower.. no difference it seems. At my lowest settings I was still getting blow through and burning the sheet metal in this picture.. it is very thin.

    After failed attempts I gave in to TRY braizing it.. first time and it was ok.. the wing on the left very strong on the right not totally strong, but after braising was able to go back and mig tack on the back of it to make it stronger.. this will end up in my garden after I figure out if I want to paint it or leave it as it really is bad.. lol I had to give up on the spark plug because it seemed that it wasn't getting hot enough .. hours later it appeared that something happened to the plug because it was warped on the bottom.. and when trying to use the tip for a ground (was going to reuse for mig and silverware), it wasn't grounding anymore.. so I think I ruined it.. So I moved on to this bolt, Mig welding the two bolts together then trying to braise the wings on....

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Wa
    Posts
    578

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    Too high wire feed rate is a common problem for blowing through. On a weld like this you do not necessarily need to hear the traditional bacon sizzle associated with mig. On really thin materials I end up getting globs that "drip" into the material.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Montana, USA
    Posts
    235

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by walker View Post
    A tig machine is likely the worst possible choice you could make at this juncture. You are a novice welder, and TIG is a somewhat advanced skill.
    SO lets solve your MIG issue before throwing you into the pit of boiling oil which is what tig would be like initially.
    First off I would post a picture of what you are trying to weld, along with what machine you are using, what gas is in your bottle (just post what it says on the label), what CFM your gas is flowing at, and what you are welding, what wire is in your machine (again, just post the label details eg; er70s-6, etc), and what settings you are using.
    I have a feeling that you are either trying to weld thin galvanized sheet, or possibly aluminum. First see if a magnet sticks to it, a picture should show the rest.
    Tig may have been difficult for you to pick up, but at start up I found tig on steel far easier than OA welding or brazing. How hard can it be to melt steel at the tip of tungsten? Pit of boiling oil? Really? Dang, I must have missed the boiling and the oil.
    Last edited by Goodhand; 05-12-2013 at 01:54 AM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    900

    Default

    jrasche2003, I would suggest either O/A welding or brazing, but rather than try to attach the entire wing, just make a few tack welds. If you use Mig, same thing, but run your weld on the plug or bolt and let it wash over on the wings. Tig would be nice, but you already have the O/A and Mig, so make do with them.

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