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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,864

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GT6Steve View Post
    This is not intended as intruding on the thread, but rather germaine.

    I have a 165 and have been struggling to learn it for a couple years now. Just myself and the Gurus on this forum. I bought a foot pedal as I couldn't work the thumbwheel and I just converted to the WP-17 torch and silken hose assembly.

    Both are major improvements IMHO. From a welding nobody BTW....

    That said. Trying it out today was a PITA as nothing seemed to work the same. I'm ignorant.

    Instead of trying to join pieces should I just work on a single clean piece and get to run smooth beads for a while? I suspect that's the learning path, what say you all?

    Thanx, Steve
    Yes. Grab a flat piece and only use the torch NO filler. Start the puddle and work across the plate working on consistency with the bead profile.

    Once you have that down you can introduce the filler- still working on flat plate/sheet

    1/8" is plenty or what ever you have around but you don't want it too thin or you'll just blow through.

    Once you get the that down you can start on butt joints, lap and then fillets.
    Ed Conley
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  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Montana, USA
    Posts
    235

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GT6Steve View Post
    This is not intended as intruding on the thread, but rather germaine.

    I have a 165 and have been struggling to learn it for a couple years now. Just myself and the Gurus on this forum. I bought a foot pedal as I couldn't work the thumbwheel and I just converted to the WP-17 torch and silken hose assembly.

    Both are major improvements IMHO. From a welding nobody BTW....

    That said. Trying it out today was a PITA as nothing seemed to work the same. I'm ignorant.

    Instead of trying to join pieces should I just work on a single clean piece and get to run smooth beads for a while? I suspect that's the learning path, what say you all?

    Thanx, Steve
    Steve,

    If you can post some photos, we can more easily iron out your technique.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    2

    Default multimatic 200 tigger

    Hello fellow tiggers I trying to figure out if you can tig weld aluminum with the miller multimatic 200 tig due to the fact that its a lift arc tig. Will get your tung dirty on start up? Can you run the tig on this machine as a non-lift arc tig process if so is it as simple as getting the foot pedal and wam bam thats it

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Huntington, NY
    Posts
    118

    Default

    You need AC output to weld Aluminum in the real world. The Multimatic lacks that.

    You can weld thick aluminum with ultra expensive lab grade Helium on DCEN, but not too convenient.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    13

    Default I've narrowed it down or not!

    I'm at a cross roads for the diversion 165 and 180. I was leaning towards the 165 but the 180 comes with the foot pedal. Also is there a huge difference between the two I mean they are both 3/16 steel or aluminum machines. Besides the 120 and 240 volt, digital display and foot pedal for the 180. What do you think, is it worth the extra money for a beginner? Decisions, what would you do in my shoes? Thanks again Steve

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    1,168

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nywelder View Post
    I'm at a cross roads for the diversion 165 and 180. I was leaning towards the 165 but the 180 comes with the foot pedal. Also is there a huge difference between the two I mean they are both 3/16 steel or aluminum machines. Besides the 120 and 240 volt, digital display and foot pedal for the 180. What do you think, is it worth the extra money for a beginner? Decisions, what would you do in my shoes? Thanks again Steve
    If you have the means, get the 180. Having a dual voltage tig, I cart it everywhere. The resale value holds better than the 165 IMO. Like you said, it comes with the pedal, which I guaranty you will purchase.

    The big picture though is that you will learn in rapid fashion. These Diversions are so simple.

    Good Luck with your decision.
    Nothing welded, Nothing gained

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  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Dalton, GA
    Posts
    124

    Default

    I would definately recommend spending the extra $400 or so for the Diversion 180 if that is doable for you. The footpedal is worth most of that and the dual voltage lets you practice almost anywhere.

    I would also suggest you consider the Thermal Arc line. They have great reviews. I have used 2 of them briefly and was impressed.
    Burt
    _______________________
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  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    13

    Default

    I made some calls today and the diversion 180 is going to be on rebate until August but the 165 is only till the end of the month which will give me time to save and go the extra for the 180. I have looked into the thermal arc and the lws do not carry there consumables but miller is readily available plus I prefer USA made. So I guess I will wait a little longer. I will keep practicing brazing to hone my skills until I can tig. Thanks for the info Steve

  9. #19

    Default

    I think you need to find a different LWS. The TA186 comes with a series 26 air cooled torch. Both Diversions come with a series 17 air cooled torch. Both 17 and 26 series torches use the exact same consumables. If you buy a Thermal Arc just tell the counter guy you have a Diversion and the collets, collet bodies, gas lense, or gas cups they sell you will all fit.

    Diversions sell fast when they hit craigs list. A lot of people get one to learn TIG and either decide they don't like TIG or want a unit with more buttons and the Diversion gets flipped.

    It's a tough choice, if you are certain you are going to get into TIG I'de go with the Thermal Arc right from the start.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    4

    Default Want to learn tig, decisions?

    I would suggest a hard look at the thermal arc. Although it is manufactured over seas, I believe the diversions are only assembled in the US and sourced over seas as well. On the thermal arc, there are quite a few more options and included accessories not to mention the stick capacity.

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