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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    2

    Lightbulb Miller Dynasty 200 DX or 350 DX for Precision Aluminum Welding

    Hi Guys;

    We're embarking on a new project which requires some aluminum welding. We tried the Dynasty 200 DX on a couple test assemblies with okay results.

    On the final assembly we're planning to employ a collapsible wall on the two mating parts - with some filler. The collapsible wall can be up to 1mm wide and 2mm tall to thermally de- couple the weld area from the main parts and assembly, thus reduce amperage requirements and total heat input into the part.

    As for the torch we're thinking of using a WeldTec micro torch (Link: http://www.tectorch.com/micro%20tig%20torch.htm)

    The question that we're not sure of is what type of TIG welder to purchase. It seems that the 200 DX has plenty of amperage but we're curious if the 350 DX might produce better results on this weld application?

    In the Miller marketing documentation the 350 DX adds Precision welding which the 200 DX doesnt have is not rated for. What features in particular does the 350 DX add that might help us? Can the 350 DX produce a smaller arc diameter to better focus the heat on small features (ie our collapsible wall)?What type of unit would you recommend for this application?

    Cheers,

    Chad
    Last edited by ChadLepto; 04-18-2013 at 12:52 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    west central Florida
    Posts
    65

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChadLepto View Post
    Hi Guys;

    As for the torch we're thinking of using a WeldTec micro torch (Link: http://www.tectorch.com/micro%20tig%20torch.htm)

    The question that we're not sure of is what type of TIG welder to purchase. It seems that the 200 DX has plenty of amperage but we're curious if the 350 DX might produce better results on this weld application?

    In the Miller marketing documentation the 350 DX adds Precision welding which the 200 DX doesnt have is not rated for. What features in particular does the 350 DX add that might help us? Can the 350 DX produce a smaller arc diameter to better focus the heat on small features (ie our collapsible wall)?What type of unit would you recommend for this application?

    Cheers,

    Chad
    If the 200 DX does the job you want then it would be okay. I don't know of any better machine for AC welding then the Dynasty series

    I see that this torch maximum amperage is 125 for the water cooled version. However, are you welding in such a confined area that you need a "micro" torch? If not then I would suggest a 250 amp water cooled torch, they're more comfortable to use in a production environment, plus you'll get much better gas coverage for aluminum welding

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    1,158

    Default

    I have all three models, and for the smaller welds I prefer my 200. The 350 and the 700 do have adjustable EP, and EN, but honestly I find it only useful for thicker materials. Also 18 program stations which the 200 does not have.

    For soda can welding I use the Tri Wave profile, which all 3 have.

    If you had to pick one, I would pick the 350DX, but the 200 can do the thin stuff as well as the 350.
    Nothing welded, Nothing gained

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    yuba city, CA
    Posts
    47

    Default 200 DX or 350?

    Quote Originally Posted by ChadLepto View Post
    Hi Guys;

    We're embarking on a new project which requires some aluminum welding. We tried the Dynasty 200 DX on a couple test assemblies with okay results.

    On the final assembly we're planning to employ a collapsible wall on the two mating parts - potentially with some 4043/4047 filler placed in between them. The collapsible wall can be up to 1mm wide and 2mm tall to thermally de- couple the weld area from the main parts and assembly, thus reduce amperage requirements and total heat input into the part.

    .....and this is an open gapped butt joint??
    ...and the wall thickness is???
    .....and there's xxx number of assemblies to weld in an hour???
    ...and the alloys being joined are?????
    If this collapsible feature is a critical feature, then consider argon back purging for much better puddle definition on the back side; much less oxidation, LOF and discontinuities that can produce inconsistent collapse results.


    As for the torch we're thinking of using a WeldTec micro torch (Link: http://www.tectorch.com/micro%20tig%20torch.htm)
    *****Unless there's really compelling reason to use a micro torch---as others have said, a larger torch with bigger gas lens cup will help in many ways.
    If one's tailoring the arc significantly (running pretty well unbalanced, fairly high AC freq., quite possibly pulsing on AC with very high (relatively speaking) peak amps---then for stable tungsten point life and performance, using a "larger than 'normal' " tungsten electrode really helps.
    This 'high energy' pulsing in AC, running unbalanced, etc. will produce min. heat input.
    If the micro torch is favored simply for using small tungsten
    for a small arc, it's not needed and you'll be switching to larger tungsten size. One can make silly small beads (.010 wide) with a #20 torch--it's all in the machine and the operator.


    The question that we're not sure of is what type of TIG welder to purchase. It seems that the 200 DX has plenty of amperage but we're curious if the 350 DX might produce better results on this weld application?
    ****Since you can now get the 200 DX to perform---that's the machine to start with. Down the road, if you feel that you can benefit from more arc tailoring, then try the 350.

    In the Miller marketing documentation the 350 DX adds Precision welding which the 200 DX doesnt have is not rated for. What features in particular does the 350 DX add that might help us? Can the 350 DX produce a smaller arc diameter to better focus the heat on small features (ie our collapsible wall)?What type of unit would you recommend for this application?

    ****The most critical part your effort will be the operator, which often is not understood or acknowledged by management. As a 6 month old, new user (but not-new tigger) of the 350, I soon realized that everything I 'Knew' about setting up and running previous high power AC/DC inverters, squarewave trannies and conventional trannies--
    ---meant nothing when learning how to setup the 350. Using old set up techniques didn't produce the same arc
    characteristics. I was able to get 'okay' results, right off-first arc.....and then start the learning curve of the little details of 350 setups....just like every experienced user of the 350 has had to do.
    (I didn't demo. the machine-first, which I normally always do--knowing from other user experiences and Miller's sheets, what it would and could do. Pay first-test drive, later.)

    [The violent 'blue lightning' arc start was one of the first things I deleted, now tailoring the arc start in the GEN menu, to something more gentle on the tungsten point and civilized. The blue lightning has it's place for some things....I just like to creep up in those milliseconds as the candle's being lit. Using the GEN arc start tailoring feature in the 200 would help for the precision welding you're doing, I suspect.]

    The 200 cannot independently adjust EN and EP amps in AC, while the 350 can. On heavy AL, this is a significant feature, which isn't recognized by many.

    On thin AL, I don't think it matters as much, especially if one's pulsing in AC with high peak amps.

    The 350 setup parameters are infinite--which is a real hoot and I'm thoroughly pleased and impressed with this machine. It continues to impress me, every day.

    It takes time, practice and study of the Miller setup details in 30 pages of the owner's manual to be able to navigate the menus, sub menus, sub-sub menus and sub-sub-sub menus of the 350's panel.
    There's a bunch of ways to setup a 350 and get satisfactory results---some better than others.
    [The Miller tutorials are good for beginners, but very rudimentary.]
    An operator who has significant experience--knows what they're looking for in the arc and then proceeds to fiddle with the setup to get the desired arc characteristics-that they want.
    The 350 is not a machine for learning 'how to weld'.


    Cheers,

    Chad
    Feel free to PM me,

    dave

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