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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Milan Michigan
    Posts
    1,730

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    Cgotto6, Your semi truck to haul 2x4s is a perfect analogy.

    Installing concrete achors dont cause your concrete to crack, If you were worried about cracks you should have put rebar in it.

    Forger, What was the wall made out of that you mounted the cross too.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    North Central Indiana
    Posts
    782

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cgotto6 View Post
    The spokesperson at red head is just covering their *ss. They will be plenty sufficient in this application. The epoxy would be like using a semi truck to haul a couple 2x4's. wedge anchors as i have already said are incredibly strong, even pull out. You could even use 1/4" ones probably and never have a problem. 4 @ 5/8 is so overkill it's a joke. And your going into seasoned Crete, which is better for this type of anchor.

    I have had to bed wedge anchors only 2 1/2" due to hydronic heating lines being cast into a slab, and when bolting down the mud sills with my 18" wrench I can practically sink a 1 1/2" diameter washer through a 2x6 if I wanted to do so. They just keep on crushing the more I torque them. I have never pulled an anchor out no matter the size or torque applied.
    Looks like you guys are right. Red Head's chart gives pull out strength on a 3/8 X 2 5/8 Trubolt wedge anchor as 3,469 lbs.

    Last edited by tackit; 04-15-2013 at 02:20 PM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Wa
    Posts
    585

    Default

    Exactly. Good luck with your table. I like to position what ever I am securing in place, with slightly over sized holes than the anchor, then roto hammer right through the flange, pound in the anchor with washers pre installed till it bottoms, then tighten her up. That way there is no chance for misalignment.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    North Central Indiana
    Posts
    782

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cgotto6 View Post
    Exactly. Good luck with your table. I like to position what ever I am securing in place, with slightly over sized holes than the anchor, then roto hammer right through the flange, pound in the anchor with washers pre installed till it bottoms, then tighten her up. That way there is no chance for misalignment.
    Thanks for the tip Cgotto6. I left a message with the son to see if he has a roto hammer I can borrow. I have to find the anchors tomorrow. I might have to order them. I think I'm going with 1/2 X 3.

    Should I drill a 9/16 hole? I was going to drill a 1/4" pilot hole first then drill the larger hole is that OK? I don't have anytime running a Roto Hammer and don't want to make a mess of it.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    The GREAT State of Texas!
    Posts
    158

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    4 Inch thick seems quite thin for shop floor....my house here in TX built in 2006 has 8 inch thick for the house and my garage (1,800 sq ft) I specified 10 inch and it is poured with a waffle pattern on 3 ft squares at 16 inch thick and it all has rebar. I did this because I had planned to install a lift (8,000 lb capacity) for lifting my cars and pickup (5,600 lb) I have been in here now since Sept 2006 and not one crack.



    Roger Troue

    Retired since 2004

    Miller 211
    Miller 200 Syncro
    Miller 375 Extreme

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    16919 Pole Rd. Brethren, MI 49619
    Posts
    4,412

    Default

    1/2 anchor. 1/2 hole and no pilot needed. Blow the dust out.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    North Central Indiana
    Posts
    782

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    I don't park vehicles or work on vehicles in my shop, it's just a hobby shop, I don't have any cracks in 10 years now. 8" of concrete would be insane for what I do.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Wa
    Posts
    585

    Default

    Sberry's got it, bit size matches anchor size. It will say on the packaging. These are stocked in all sizes at Home Depot and lowes btw. Don't know if you have either of those near you.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Milan Michigan
    Posts
    1,730

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    Tackit, When Cgottosaid said oversized hole in a earlier post I'm pretty sure what he meant was to make sure the hole in the steel plate was at least a 1/6" bigger than the hole that you drill into the concrete, Otherwise the anchor itself will get caught on the steel plate.

    The anchors are a tad bigger than the hole you drill in the concrete.

    Like S Berry said, Do not pilot drill and use a 1/2" bit for a 1/2" anchor.

    Cgotto6, I have never heard of a ROTO Hammer, Here in the big city we call them a Hammer Drill.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    402

    Default

    TxDarth is that a frustrated mechanic hanging from your ceiling in the 1st pic?-Meltedmetal

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