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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    4

    Default 1st home machine

    I just received my miller multimatic 200 and need some advise on breaker size to use. I want to put in a new 220v breaker but any recommendations as to the size I should use? I will be using mostly the MIG for sheet metal work but the occational stick on nothing thicker than 1/4" . I have the TIG kit to learn on but this wont be any type of full duty welding. what size breaker should I install for general use? is a 50 A too large or should this be a good start? I haven't been able to try any welding with it yet because I don't have gas or wire til Monday morning.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    WY...armpit of U.S.A.
    Posts
    659

    Default

    Didn't they include an owner's manual with your welder? Look on page 28 if you have one. If you don't, download one by heading to the top of the page and highlighting the Resources tab and go from there.
    Miller 251...sold the spoolgun to DiverBill.
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    Too small of a shop at 40 X 59.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    greenfield new hampshire
    Posts
    858

    Default

    50 amp, there are tons of threads on this subject for various welders, on all of the welders that i have owned, in the book or on the tag on the machine it will state the input voltage and ampherage, if you have no knowledge of this welder, get the book and check the voltage links in side the welder, so you have it match your power source

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    4

    Default

    I do have the book and its a bit confusing... but it clearly says on 120VAC I will need a 15 or 20A breaker with time delay or circuit breaker but on the 230 single phase it gets a bit confusing... says " input amps 17.7, max recommended standard fuses rated in ampers or time delay 20 , normal operating fuses 25... then it says min 14 gauge wire on a cord no longer than 20 meters. so by reading this I am assuming that a 20 amp breaker for 120v and a 25 amp if I ran a 220v plug from the breaker panel??? and not to use a cord any longer than 50' min wire gauge 14 on the cord. Am I reading this right?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    WY...armpit of U.S.A.
    Posts
    659

    Default

    You've more or less answered your questions. Unless you don't mind that 220v circuit being a dedicated circuit just for the welder, size that 14 ga. wire up so you can use the circuit for other equipment if you so choose.
    Miller 251...sold the spoolgun to DiverBill.
    Miller DialArc 250
    Lincoln PrecisionTig 275
    Hypertherm 900 plasma cutter
    Bridgeport "J" head mill...tooled up
    Jet 14 X 40 lathe...ditto
    South Bend 9" lathe...yeah, got the change gears too
    Logan 7" shaper
    Ellis 3000 band saw
    Hossfeld bender w/shopbuilt hyd.
    Victor Journeyman torch and gauges
    3 Gerstner boxes of mostly Starrett tools
    Lots of dust bunnies
    Too small of a shop at 40 X 59.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    16919 Pole Rd. Brethren, MI 49619
    Posts
    4,364

    Default

    This is a ****thole in the owners manual and I cant figure out wtf it would take to fix it?????????????????? If it comes with a 50A plug it can be plugged in to a 50A circuit provided the wire in such said circuit is heavy enough for the machine,,, in this case a 12.

    IF,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, you use the minimum 14 wire you must limit the breaker to 30 or 35, whatever it says. , I dont see how it could hurt Miller to simply up the min manufacturers wire size to 12 and get rid of the nonsense which in reality no one thinks is a great idea anyway?

    Personally I usually have a 30A with a 10 on it, I always feel like these machines are small, help from a wire cant hurt and limiting the overcurrent isnt dangerous, dont cost any different. In reality a 12 within 75 ft or so and any breaker over 20 is fine.

    The benifit to using a 10 is that it could run a buzzer with a breaker change.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    16919 Pole Rd. Brethren, MI 49619
    Posts
    4,364

    Default

    Forget all that nonsense about the 14 cord, that is the NEMA and code minimum. There are a couple 3, 4 or more reasons this is a crap idea and isn't a real cost/convenience issue. If you are using all this class of machine, a plasma 375 too, or a Maxstar 150 then a 12 cord is all you need in 240V and you can use it on circuits to 50A. All the premise wiring could be 12, its an advantage of these units, cheap to run a new outlet, connect to same breaker, in some cases could use 2 machines one circuit.

    I have welder outlet on my hoist, uses the same wire and breaker.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    253

    Default

    A 30A breaker would be perfect but I'd put in a 50A. If you get an over-current condition, everything melting and bursting into flame should be outside the wall anyway. I have some 5 Watt night lights plugged into 20 Amp sockets. No problems so far.

    I know this stuff can be confusing until you get a handle on it. Good to ask and learn a bit. You could install a 50A outlet and wire to match and still use a 30A breaker if you are the cautious sort. Smaller size breakers are inexpensive.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Thanks for all the responses... I am going to run a dedicated line and I will oversize it. the 14 gauge was just what I read to use as a minimum extension cord. I am by no means an electrician which is why I was asking before doing anything... so... just to make sure I got this right... I should install at least a 30A breaker (would 50A be too much?) using 10 -12 gauge wire and a 220 plug rated for 50A I am also looking at running 2 separate plug in sources in my garage ( 1 on each side of the garage), they wont be used at the same time but just so I will be able to plug in the welder at each location since the welding leads are not long enough to run the entire room or if I only ran 1 line and made a 10 gauge extension cord say 50 ' which is the better idea? just to give you some background on me... I do a lot of stick welding at work... self taught but mostly fabrication on 1/8 to 1/2 steel with the occasional stainless... I also gas weld... cutting,soldering and braising but have done some gas welding too when I was in high school metal shop(25 yrs ago)I have played with MIG but the machine wasn't set up correctly... I have never TIG welded but always wanted to learn (I was told by a welder that if I knew gas welding I could pick up TIG easily) I need to go in the morning for gas... I understand that the 75/25 is the general gas for MIG and TIG for steel... but aluminum needs 100% argon... does any other situation require 100% argon or does anything work better with 100 argon? I am looking at 2 bottles but if im not doing aluminum just yet can I get away with only the 75/25 for now?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    northern NJ
    Posts
    1,794

    Default

    Use argon for tig (steel, stainless & aluminum) & 75/25 for mig. Do not use 75/25 for any tig work!
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