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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    400

    Default

    You may want to grind/machine out those pits before you try again to get rid of any crud left over from the previous attempt. Maybe clean between laying beads. If you have an O/A torch as turbo38t said you can use silver solder. I like Handy Flux from Handy and Harman for this but to get a complete cover it has to be clean. Or you can use bronze but it also requires complete cleanliness.
    Meltedmetal

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    299

    Default

    Yeah, I do agree with having to have it CLEAN, CLEAN, VERY CLEAN.....oh, yeah...did I say CLEAN????? I hadn't thought of using silver solder or maybe bronze (silicon-bronze) for this application, as I usually use that stuff on thinner materials, which this is not. BUT I will say that if you can get good coverage on the area where the seal contacts the part, silly bronze will clean up (down?) to a very nice, smooth surface that would likely work very well with the seal......

    By the way, it has been a while since this thread was started....how is the project coming?
    Don J
    Reno, NV

    Never pick a fight with an old guy. Old guys are too smart to fight and get hurt. They'll just kill you and get it over with.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Thanks again for the input guys.
    The project is going slow. I work on welding/grinding the drive shaft for a while (an hour or two every couple of days) but as I get discouraged, I'll switch to another part of the project (rebuild of a 1960 Mercury outboard). Sanding/priming, cleaning, sourcing parts takes up the rest of my time...which I don't get much of. Here are two pictures of the project.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bossier Parish La.
    Posts
    549

    Default

    A 1960 Mercury outboard? That's back when they were white, I think it was late 60's early 70's when they switched to black. That one looks to be about 10 HP or so, isn't it? Any parts you have trouble finding, check the place I mentioned they may have it. If you find some locally and it seems a steep price, they may beat it, not to mention it will be a NEW part from that era. That would be a good bet on ignition parts instead of old used ones that you can't tell how much life they may have left in them. Don't want to go through all that work and then can't get it to fire. Do you have a picture of the boat you plan on putting it on?

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Yup, you are right, they were white back then (Mercury called it "Cloud White"). The picture I had of the parts were just primed. I'll start painting the final color maybe next week. This is actually at 30hp. Attached is a picture (my son and my mother) of the boat that it will go back on. The boat and motor have been in the family for 40 years. Last year it sunk, which is the reason (in addition to age) that it is being rebuilt. If I'm not able to take care of the shaft with welding then I'll try the Speedi-Sleeve...but those are expensive in Canada for some reason. I'll check out the place you mentioned but part of the issue is the cost to have it shipped to Canada.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bossier Parish La.
    Posts
    549

    Default

    It was kind of hard to judge size without something to compare to, but I know those old motors are a lot bigger in size than a comparable HP motor today, so I was kinda guessing on the rating.
    I like old boats like that one, they can be a lot of fun out on the water. I have a 1956 Dura-Craft runabout, similar to that one without the big tailfins. I hope you are planning on installing some flotation during the rebuild to prevent another sinking. This would only make sense after all the rebuild effort. Is the boat getting another coat of paint? If so, I would recommend using an Emron paint, it works well with fiberglass. I repainted a 1973 Chrysler fiberglass boat with that several years ago and it is still holding up well, with no cracking or peeling.

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