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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    northern NJ
    Posts
    1,832

    Default

    If you just want to know if a 180 class tig machine can do thicker than 3/16" the amswer is yes. I got by for years using a Lincoln 175 square wave tig. I commonly welded 1/4" aluminum with occasionaly thicker. Use of pre heat & bevels works wonders. The biggest issue was the duty cycle. If I wasn'
    t careful the machine would shut down. Once in a while I'd pop a 50 amp breaker also.

    Any machine in this class is almost the same as far as output. Lincoln upped theirs to a 225 amp & Miller to a 200 amp. At max output the duty cycle was stupidly low. You can only get so much out of a 50 amp breaker with a transformer based machine.

    The above applies to transformer based machines.
    Last edited by MMW; 03-10-2013 at 07:45 PM.
    MM250
    Trailblazer 250g
    22a feeder
    Lincoln ac/dc 225
    Victor O/A
    MM200 black face
    Whitney 30 ton hydraulic punch
    Lown 1/8x 36" power roller
    Arco roto-phase model M
    Vectrax 7x12 band saw
    Miller spectrum 875
    30a spoolgun w/wc-24
    Syncrowave 250
    RCCS-14

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    northern NJ
    Posts
    1,832

    Default

    If your talking about the diversion welders, the 165 & 180 are both rated the same. 150 amps at 20% duty cycle. The 180 duty cycle at max is 10%. Not very good. So even though you get an extra 15 amps it's only good for 1 minute out of 10.

    With aluminum there really is no substitute for amps.
    MM250
    Trailblazer 250g
    22a feeder
    Lincoln ac/dc 225
    Victor O/A
    MM200 black face
    Whitney 30 ton hydraulic punch
    Lown 1/8x 36" power roller
    Arco roto-phase model M
    Vectrax 7x12 band saw
    Miller spectrum 875
    30a spoolgun w/wc-24
    Syncrowave 250
    RCCS-14

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by turbo38t View Post
    I have a 165 with foot pedal if you want to come try it out. I'm 20 minutes south of the parkway bridge...
    Kind of you to offer.
    How thick have you welded with it?

  4. #14

    Default

    Check this out. Anyone have any feed back about this machine? It's a thermal arc 186. 200amp. Square wave, ac/dc tig stick and a little higher duty cycle than miller diversion with a lot more options.
    It's a toss up for me because I'm a miller guy and think they have a good product.




    http://m.cyberweld.com/tharc186acti.html

  5. #15
    turbo38t Guest

    Default

    I have welded 3/16 with it. Wouldn't weld more than 1/8 with any seriousness. Very nice on 1/8 but duty cycle or not how much aluminum r u really going to weld with an air cooles torch?
    Quote Originally Posted by Raul McCai View Post
    Kind of you to offer.
    How thick have you welded with it?

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    7

    Default

    how much aluminum r u really going to weld with an air cooles torch?
    I'll see more steel than aluminum. I don't need very much 3/8" aluminum but I will need some.

    Most of the stainless I'll work will be thinner like between 0.020" and 0.125"
    The steel will be thicker: from 0.125" to 0.375"
    Aluminum I'll see will be mostly 0.250" to 0.375" but less often 0.375"
    Then there will be the very occasional bit of inconel and hastalloy. I'd love to have a ton of inconel (I'm a brewer) but the stuff is spendy.



    It's a thermal arc 186. 200amp. Square wave, ac/dc tig stick and a little higher duty cycle
    Nice price. Thermal Arc is a Victor product. ( Victor was Thermadyne) they have multiprocess machines but managed not to include a plasma cutter.
    A 35% duty cycle you have what - - - 6.5 minutes of welding time out of any given ten minute period?
    Are they making the 186 any more?

    look at the PDF for the 181i
    http://victortechnologies.com/Therma...29_May2012.pdf

    The miller 165 has duty cycle reported at
    60 A at 12.4 V, 100% Duty Cycle
    150 A at 16 V, 20% Duty Cycle
    165 A at 16.6 V, 15% Duty Cycle


    The Victor machine duty cycle is reported as:
    140 A at 25.6 V, 30% Duty Cycle
    175 A at 27 V, 20% Duty Cycle

    I don't know how to read the Volts/Amps differences. That is: what's it mean to the welding experience that one is 25.6 V and the other is 16 V in a sort of similar range of Amps.
    Last edited by Raul McCai; 03-11-2013 at 10:48 AM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Northern Arizona
    Posts
    457

    Default

    You have the duty cycle backwards. 35% is 3.5 minutes of welding and 6.5 minutes of cooling. 100% would be non-stop welding.
    MillerMatic 251
    CST 280 w/tig torch
    HF-251-D1
    Cutmaster 42
    Victor Journeyman OA

    A rockcrawler, er money pit, in progress...

  8. #18

    Default

    The only place I've seen that thermal arc 186 is on cyberweld.com
    That fabricator 181 you pulled up isn't the same one.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    northern NJ
    Posts
    1,832

    Default

    If your going to do more than the occasional 1/4" to 3/8" aluminum then this size machine is not for you.
    MM250
    Trailblazer 250g
    22a feeder
    Lincoln ac/dc 225
    Victor O/A
    MM200 black face
    Whitney 30 ton hydraulic punch
    Lown 1/8x 36" power roller
    Arco roto-phase model M
    Vectrax 7x12 band saw
    Miller spectrum 875
    30a spoolgun w/wc-24
    Syncrowave 250
    RCCS-14

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