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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default TIG guys......feeding the filler technique?

    The Tig Pen really helps too.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Lees Summit,Mo
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Try feeding the wire between your ring finger and your middle finger and slowly push with your thumb leave your index finger free. Also you can practice by taking pair of thin cloth gloves (brown jesery gloves you can buy at dollar general or a store) and start with a piece of 1/16 wire a full stick and start buy placing wire in between ring finger and middle finger and slightly make a C shape with your hand and slowly push rod with your thumb. Trust me it takes practice but if you have free time just practice and it time you will get the feel

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    561

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jrscgsr View Post
    I feed with my index and middle fingers, I use my thumb to put a constant slight pressure on the filler rod to keep it stable. I can tack weld 10' of filler together and weld a joint with it non stop. Saves a huge amount of time versus bumping the filler out with your shoulder ect.

    I have a 4' X 16' fab table and I don't know what I would do with 10' of filler. I hope your Joking!!!! I just can't see wasting the time to tack 10' of filler together. Just my .02

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    306

    Default

    Lol no I don't actually tack filler rods together. Just making a point. I have seen others weld and stop to bump out more filler rod, if you added up all the lost arc time it would be surprising, not to mention all the stops and starts in your welds.
    Miller syncrowave 200 runner with coolmate 4
    and wp2025 weldcraft torch
    Miller 125c plasma cutter

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    561

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jrscgsr View Post
    Lol no I don't actually tack filler rods together. Just making a point. I have seen others weld and stop to bump out more filler rod, if you added up all the lost arc time it would be surprising, not to mention all the stops and starts in your welds.

    Cool, I thought so. With a little practice it's not all that hard to get the hang of advancing the filler.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    24

    Default Advancing the Filler

    Hey,

    The instructor at the shop where I plan on taking a few TIG lessons reinforces what you all are saying.... feeding the rod is one of the techniques that is tough to perfect. He suggested practicing with a pencil, too.

    I began practicing with a piece of coat hanger wire. It's probably a little bigger around than most filler wire; but, working my fingers around a smaller rod shouldn't be too much different (hopefully).

    Before I totally screw up my technique, I was wondering if anyone could comment on the two techniques presented on WeldingTipsandTricks. The itsy-bitsy spider technique he demonstrates seems to be the most comfortable for me when you practicing on the couch. I use my thumb and three fingers to move the rod along (without a glove). Using a rolling motion it seems like advancing the rod is fairly smooth. How much stick-out is generally good?

    Any thoughts about these two techniques would be appreciated. (Any other suggestions would be great, too.)

    (I'll post on a separate thread regarding gloves.)

    Thanks for your help.

    Jeff

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Hi,

    I advance the filler by laying it across the grove between my thumb and index finger, then use my index finger and middle (next) finger to advance my rod.
    Advancing the filler this way works for me. This works very well if you want to stack dimes as the time between addition of filler gives time to advance the rod.
    On bigger welds I feed a good bit of rod into the [pool then move ahead with the torch and repeat. This leaves a larger distance between the beads but looks good, especially if everything is set up well, it gives a nice pattern with a shiny section then a frosted section and so on.

    One thing not talked about is the way filler is added to the pool.

    I have been told that forcing the filler until it feels resistance is good for penetration; however I have read that it is important to add filler slowly not to disrupt or cool the molten pool.
    Any feed back on this?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Hi,

    Advancing the filler rod through your hand is one thing to master and we have seen some good ideas on this.

    What do members have to say about the best way to introduce filler into the molten pool; not how to advance the rod but rather how it should be introduced to the pool.

    I was told by an experienced welder that it is good to push the rod into the pool until some resistance is felt and that this would give better penetration.
    On the other hand I have read that is best to introduce the filler in a manner that doesn't disrupt or cool the pool.

    Looking for different ideas on the subject.

    Thanks

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    4

    Default

    I took a piece of tig wire, and put a loop on one end about the size of a quarter. Hooked up an electrical meter and set it to continuity. One lead to the tig wire with the loop, the second lead to the filler wire in my hand. Every time I hit the loop, the meter would beep. Something to mess around with while watching TV.

    Now, if someone builds these I get a cut....

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    At the epicenter of the Green Mountain Range in VT
    Posts
    309

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wen Valley View Post
    I took a piece of tig wire, and put a loop on one end about the size of a quarter. Hooked up an electrical meter and set it to continuity. One lead to the tig wire with the loop, the second lead to the filler wire in my hand. Every time I hit the loop, the meter would beep. Something to mess around with while watching TV.

    Now, if someone builds these I get a cut....
    Thomas Edison and Tesla would be jealous!

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