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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    28

    Default Mig cold joint??

    What does a mig "cold joint" look like?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    chilliwack BC
    Posts
    38

    Default Mig cold joint??

    Prob has snow or ice on it. ;-)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    19

    Default

    [SUB[/SUB]

    For starters, look at the toes of the weld.

    Also, what type of joint in particular: lap, butt, etc?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO
    Posts
    172

    Default

    If I am correct, I think you are referring to "cold lap" or properly called incomplete fusion. It is a common problem in mig welding and can be on the underside of the weld or on the leg or toe of the weld. Obviously, if it is on the underside you can't see it. But if it is on the leg or toe, it will look like the weld is just laying on top of the base metal not really fused together. Kinda hard to visualize until you actually see it. Will try to find a picture and post it for you.
    It is usally caused by trying to weld too thick of base metal without some preheat or an incorrectly adjusted machine. It is also a very big problem when mig welding aluminum.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Most of the joints would be fillets.

    I've taken mig courses and have been mig welding a long time but I'm not a "professional welder" in that I don't weld for a living. However, I weld a lot - way more than the average hobbyist and I get a lot of positive feedback on my skills. I manufacture a product which I sell mostly at car shows and swapmeets.

    Here's the dilemma ...
    On two occasions I've had people tell me "there are some cold joints there" but they've never actually pointed them out. The only thing I can see is that on some welds the surface of the bead is not "shiny". Otherwise, they all look pretty much the same to me. In 5 years of making this product I've had nothing but positive feedback from customers and not a single mention of a broken joint. And many of my products have been sold to fabricators who've felt building the product was not worth the effort versus buying mine!

    I will point out that I weld mostly 3/16 material but there are some lighter gauge pieces that I attach without changing the settings. But I can't see this causing cold joints.

    Could it be, as one observer pointed out when someone made the comment, that "some people just need something to complain about" ?
    Last edited by gkent; 02-05-2013 at 03:26 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Wa
    Posts
    577

    Default

    Well if you can use the same settings for 3/16ths on thinner material successfully, that makes me think it might not be hot enough for the 3/16ths.

    Post a pic
    Last edited by Cgotto6; 02-05-2013 at 06:39 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    S.W. Missouri
    Posts
    154

    Default

    gkent, Here is a good example I ran into on a combine bracket.
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Western Pa.
    Posts
    228

    Default Mig cold joint??

    Could it be, as one observer pointed out when someone made the comment, that "some people just need something to complain about" ?
    U may hv hit the nail on the head ^ . And
    Jpence38 had pretty good explanation.
    But it pretty hard to get a cold weld on 3/16 metal with out it looking pretty bad.
    With that thin of metal if the weld looks good it's probably fine. Dull or shiny isn't a problem & the lighter metal at that setting should be a problem

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Western Pa.
    Posts
    228

    Default Mig cold joint??

    Dull or shiny isn't a problem & the lighter metal at that setting shouldn't be a problem.
    Sorry mistyped:
    Shouldn't !! Be a problem.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Wa
    Posts
    577

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gnforge View Post
    Dull or shiny isn't a problem & the lighter metal at that setting shouldn't be a problem.
    Sorry mistyped:
    Shouldn't !! Be a problem.
    I guess maybe for tacking. But not for running a real bead.

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