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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    570

    Default Filling small tanks

    I have a 211 on the way.

    Now I have to figure out what size gas bottles to get. Maybe get the large rental to keep in the shop.

    The largest purchase size is the 160 at my LWS.

    The 160 is still kind of heavy so thinking for my truck I'll get the 80. Should get close to 4 hours out of it and I need to save space and weight.

    There has got to be a way to refill the small tank from the large (225 I think) tank. I saw a post about it somewhere online but lost it. I would like to have that option with such a small tank or I may need to rethink for a 160 portable.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    greenfield new hampshire
    Posts
    876

    Default

    how much welding will you be doing, if quite a bit, get the rental, refills are much cheaper, as far as a set up to fill your own tanks, i have no idea about buying one, making one would be easy if you had the plumbing connectors

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    northern NJ
    Posts
    1,847

    Default

    I hesitate to post but here it is.

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#cga-complia...ttings/=lc34ne

    Do not do this with acetylene!! Do not do this with any flammable gas either!!

    Even other gases can be dangerous. High pressure, suffocation from oxygen displacement, bottle turned into a missle, explosion, etc.


    Get two appropriate cgaxxx nuts & nipples + a 3000# tee + a gauge. Do not use a rubber hose, just the fittings. Tighten it all up then open empty bottle valve all the way then crack open the full bottle a tiny bit & let it fill slowly. If you fill it to fast it will create a lot of heat. Close all valves & crack open a nut to release pressure then remove. The bottles will equalize in pressure so your not actually filling the smaller one all the way.

    Do not do this with acetylene!! Do not do this with any flammable gas either!!
    Last edited by MMW; 02-04-2013 at 03:42 PM.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Salem, NJ
    Posts
    271

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MMW View Post
    Do not do this with acetylene!!
    Edit: Do not do this with ANY flammable gas!
    It is better this way for you, and your neighbor

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    134

    Default Fittings

    Western makes the fittings. Your local welding supply should be able to get them, they are replacement nipples that attachs your regulator to bottle. I have been fill my small bottles for years with no problem. Just cannot fill acelylene.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    900

    Default

    Cylinder and refill prices are all over the map, so a recommendation from Texas may not help someone out of state. I used to like the 220' cylinders, but old age has decided for me that 125' is plenty large. I still have an 80' that I am going to swap in toward a 122'.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Memphis, TN 38133, USA, Earth, Milky Way
    Posts
    62

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MMW View Post
    Do not do this with acetylene!! Do not do this with any flammable gas either!!
    I believe you, and I won't, but I gotta know... What would happen?


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    570

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MMW View Post
    I hesitate to post but here it is.

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#cga-complia...ttings/=lc34ne

    Do not do this with acetylene!! Do not do this with any flammable gas either!!

    Even other gases can be dangerous. High pressure, suffocation from oxygen displacement, bottle turned into a missle, explosion, etc.


    Get two appropriate cgaxxx nuts & nipples + a 3000# tee + a gauge. Do not use a rubber hose, just the fittings. Tighten it all up then open empty bottle valve all the way then crack open the full bottle a tiny bit & let it fill slowly. If you fill it to fast it will create a lot of heat. Close all valves & crack open a nut to release pressure then remove. The bottles will equalize in pressure so your not actually filling the smaller one all the way.

    Do not do this with acetylene!! Do not do this with any flammable gas either!!
    Thanks for the info MMW and the rest of you guys also. I have done this with SCUBA gear, with a Spare Air and a pony bottle. but did not know what to look for in connections. I think its a good idea when you have a small tank but I still haven't made that decision.

    As the last poster said, he is thinking on trading up from an 80 to a 160. Thats probably what I'll look at if the 80 just doesn't cut it. This refill would be a neat option tho.

    I am scared enough of psi. The scuba tanks are 3000psi, well if you get a good fill and the valves I test at work can go to 4000psi. I've had my share of failures at 3000psi with hydraulics's.

    After something blows, its hard to go back to work. Scares the crap out of you, and your just afraid to fire it up again plus your covered in oil. Got a couple scars from it and have seen people get hurt.

    So I can understand your hesitation to post about it. Edit it if you like, I saved the info I need if this is what I end up doing.

    Thanks

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