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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2

    Default wiring a 220v extention

    I just bought a Econotig which I had found for what I saw as a nice price. The guy before me was selling it for a friend and the owner had wired an extension on the the power cable. I was told the machine is in perfect working order but I went ahead and opened up the slice just to make sure. When I got inside the cable I saw that the line from the welder has three wires (White, Black and Green) and the extension has four (White, Black, Green and Red). The fourth line (Red) was left open as it had no correlating connection. This bothers me. I have never wired a 220v before and was wondering if this is a common occurrence and what should be done about it. Ideally, I would like to have this Red wire connected to something if at all possible, but I am not even sure what its purpose is.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    -Lee

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sweetwater, TX
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    201

    Default

    For 220V in a lot of cases you are only going to have 3 wires 120 (white) 120 (black) and Ground (green). The red wire is at times used for the 3rd leg L3 for 3-phase wiring.

    The two 120V legs are out of phase if you look at them with an oscilloscope and that is why you get 240V when you measure across them.

    On 3-phase capable welders connected to single phase, the RED wire is left not connected on the welder.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    884

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Mac View Post
    I just bought a Econotig which I had found for what I saw as a nice price. The guy before me was selling it for a friend and the owner had wired an extension on the the power cable. I was told the machine is in perfect working order but I went ahead and opened up the slice just to make sure. When I got inside the cable I saw that the line from the welder has three wires (White, Black and Green) and the extension has four (White, Black, Green and Red). The fourth line (Red) was left open as it had no correlating connection. This bothers me. I have never wired a 220v before and was wondering if this is a common occurrence and what should be done about it. Ideally, I would like to have this Red wire connected to something if at all possible, but I am not even sure what its purpose is.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    -Lee
    Lee, it is not needed. Just ignore it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2

    Default

    [QUOTE=clint738;301020]The red wire is at times used for the 3rd leg L3 for 3-phase wiring.

    So, does this mean that the Red wire is no hot? I.E. is it safe to leave the wire open even though it is connected to the wall?

    My preference would be to cap the wire regardless and seal the whole connection. Might anyone have suggestions on the best way to seal a 220v splice? I feel uneasy using regular electricial tape.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sweetwater, TX
    Posts
    201

    Default

    [QUOTE=Big Mac;301023]
    Quote Originally Posted by clint738 View Post
    The red wire is at times used for the 3rd leg L3 for 3-phase wiring.

    So, does this mean that the Red wire is no hot? I.E. is it safe to leave the wire open even though it is connected to the wall?

    My preference would be to cap the wire regardless and seal the whole connection. Might anyone have suggestions on the best way to seal a 220v splice? I feel uneasy using regular electricial tape.
    The Red wire would only be hot if the terminal on the plug (that had the red wire attached) was plugged into a receptacle that had the terminal hot.

    You can just ignore the Red wire since it is not used. It is often taped back on welders that are capable of 3 phase. Here are some pictures.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...in-smoke/page4

    It appears that since your welder is only 3 wires it is not 3-phase capable, hence they had a extension cord with 4 wires and left out RED which is normal.

    If you really want to make sure the RED can't get hot, then at the plug on the end of the extension, make sure the RED is disconnected. Then it wouldn't matter what type of receptacle you plugged into the RED could not become energized if it is not connected on the plug end.

    When wiring up several transformers 50-70 lbs each I was given some special electrical tape to tape up the non-used taps. It was basically a thicker form of electrical tape that had a higher temp rating. So taping the red back with electrical tape should be fine, especially if you've disconnected the RED from the plug end too.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    WY...armpit of U.S.A.
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    659

    Default

    If the extension cord is rated for your welder, the Econotig manual I looked at on the Miller site listed 6 ga. power and 8 ga. ground, just run the extension cord into your welder and forget about splicing the original power cable.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,838

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Mac View Post
    I just bought a Econotig which I had found for what I saw as a nice price. The guy before me was selling it for a friend and the owner had wired an extension on the the power cable. I was told the machine is in perfect working order but I went ahead and opened up the slice just to make sure. When I got inside the cable I saw that the line from the welder has three wires (White, Black and Green) and the extension has four (White, Black, Green and Red). The fourth line (Red) was left open as it had no correlating connection. This bothers me. I have never wired a 220v before and was wondering if this is a common occurrence and what should be done about it. Ideally, I would like to have this Red wire connected to something if at all possible, but I am not even sure what its purpose is.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    -Lee
    Splicing an extension cord on to the Welder's power cord is not a good idea. You really should use connectors ( Plug/receptacle) on the ends of the cords.

    It would be better to open up the machine, remove the Power cord and then just terminate the "extension" cord wires inside the welder (as Roy mentioned)

    The Color coding on the wires themselves gets a wee bit confusing when talking back n forth between Single Phase and 3 Phase.

    The Econotig is Single Phase 240v so it only requires 3 wires to operate safely.
    Power Cord
    L1 Black
    L2 White
    Ground Green

    It gets even more confoosing when you wire a receptacle in the wall because normally the wiring color code in the wall for 240v single phase is
    L1-Black
    L2-Red
    Ground green.

    120v wiring in the wall is
    L1-Black
    Neutral White
    Ground Green

    The 4-wire extension cord you have then throws in anutter curve because you only need 3 of the wires in the cord for your application and if you were to look at the wall wiring 1st you would see Red, Black and Green but that doesn't match up with the Power cord on the machine that has Black, White and Green. WTF?

    The electricity doesn't care about the color on the wire so and in 240v L1 and L2 can be switched- Either one can be Black/Red or Black/White.

    It looks like the previous owner decided to just keep the color coding consistent from the Power cord through the Extension cord using the color scheme
    Black, White, Green and disregard the Red wire- which is perfectly fine as long as it is not connected at either end (as clint mentioned).

    make sense
    Ed Conley
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    884

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Broccoli1 View Post
    Splicing an extension cord on to the Welder's power cord is not a good idea. You really should use connectors ( Plug/receptacle) on the ends of the cords.

    It would be better to open up the machine, remove the Power cord and then just terminate the "extension" cord wires inside the welder (as Roy mentioned)

    The Color coding on the wires themselves gets a wee bit confusing when talking back n forth between Single Phase and 3 Phase.

    The Econotig is Single Phase 240v so it only requires 3 wires to operate safely.
    Power Cord
    L1 Black
    L2 White
    Ground Green

    It gets even more confoosing when you wire a receptacle in the wall because normally the wiring color code in the wall for 240v single phase is
    L1-Black
    L2-Red
    Ground green.

    120v wiring in the wall is
    L1-Black
    Neutral White
    Ground Green

    The 4-wire extension cord you have then throws in anutter curve because you only need 3 of the wires in the cord for your application and if you were to look at the wall wiring 1st you would see Red, Black and Green but that doesn't match up with the Power cord on the machine that has Black, White and Green. WTF?

    The electricity doesn't care about the color on the wire so and in 240v L1 and L2 can be switched- Either one can be Black/Red or Black/White.

    It looks like the previous owner decided to just keep the color coding consistent from the Power cord through the Extension cord using the color scheme
    Black, White, Green and disregard the Red wire- which is perfectly fine as long as it is not connected at either end (as clint mentioned).

    make sense
    I agree with Ed, and while you are at it, just cut the red wire off flush and forget about it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    16919 Pole Rd. Brethren, MI 49619
    Posts
    4,376

    Default

    I didnt read this word for word but the red is used in a 4 wire,,, if the plug on your wall is 4 wire then use the red.black and green to the machine black, red to whi9te and green for ground. The machine needs 3 wires,,, 2 ungrounded conductors and a ground.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    28

    Default

    What's all this "3 phase" crap ?!?

    4 wires are often used for 220 ... The red and black are each 110 volts, the green is ground. As such you have straight 220 volts. The white wire is neutral and is used when 110 volts is also needed. An example would be a 220 volt mig where the wire feed motor runs on 110. An electric kitchen stove is another example ... The burners use 220 but the clock and oven light use 110. Your tig runs on 220 with nothing needing 110 so only the two hots and a ground are necessary. The 4 wires cable was probably more readily available - just snip off or tape the extra wire.

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