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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    601

    Default

    Not to confuse you more, BUT, Miller has a contractor kit. I'm not sure if the foot pedal connection will match the CST 280. You just gotta price everything out to see what works best. Just thought I would torture you more.

    http://store.cyberweld.com/milconkitwit.html

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sweetwater, TX
    Posts
    201

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BD1 View Post
    Not to confuse you more, BUT, Miller has a contractor kit. I'm not sure if the foot pedal connection will match the CST 280. You just gotta price everything out to see what works best. Just thought I would torture you more.

    http://store.cyberweld.com/milconkitwit.html
    Thanks for the link BD1, I have looked at those kits but there are some things that I don't like about them like the short (15ft electrode and ground leads). I want my leads to be 25ft so I can reach anything in my shop without an extension.

    It does have the HD footpedal I was originally looking for.

    I'm not sure about using the 150A WP17v tig torch since it is only rated for 150A and I will have a 200A welder. I'm not really sure what uses I will find for the tig once I start learning how to use it

    My main uses for tig starting out will be welding stuff like 1/8", 14ga, 11ga.

    Not sure if that helps with determining how much amperage I will need on the tig torch.

    Also I'm not sure which is better, the flowgauge
    http://store.cyberweld.com/smflreh1.html

    or a flowmeter with the bubble.
    http://store.cyberweld.com/smflreh2.html
    or
    http://store.cyberweld.com/smflreh11.html

    I thought the flowmeter with the bubble was the proper way to measure flow? I am clueless on the meter differences, advantages and tradeoffs.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Near Dallas, TX
    Posts
    214

    Default

    The flowmeter with the gauge is measuring pressure, then assuming how much flow you'd get from that pressure through a orifice. Since it's actually measuring pressure, it can show "flow" when there isn't any.

    The ball-type is really measuring flow.

    I have the first two links you posted (or ones that look very similar). Both of them will do the job. Given that the ball-type one is more desireable (in my opinion) and it's cheaper anywyay, it's a no-brainer. The last link looks like a nicer one, but you have to pay for it.

    If you want to do tig, then I think you'll be better off with the dense connectors. Either one will work with adapters, but most of the tig stuff I've seen is setup for dense. The tweco have a little more 'meat' in them, so they'll probably carry more current without heating up. Both of them are mechanically strong enough that I think they'll break the connector out of the machine before they break themselves. I run dense-to-tweco connectors on my dynasty when I do stick. I only do this because I already have lots of lead with tweco connectors.

    Dynasty200DX w/coolmate1
    MM210
    MM Vintage
    Lincoln AC225
    Victor O/A, Smith AW1A
    Cutmaster 81
    IR 2475N7.5FP
    Evolution Rage3
    Jancy USA101
    9" South Bend
    AEAD-200LE

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sweetwater, TX
    Posts
    201

    Default

    Picked up a few things today.
    Went to the PraxAir welding supply store (the only one open on Saturday) and bought 50ft of size #1 Direct Wire welding lead (25ft for ground / 25ft for electrode).
    The cable says "Made in USA" on it so I figure it has to be as good if not better than the MUCH cheaper Radnor cable.
    Bought a 200A Tweco electrode holder and a 300A Prostar ground clamp also.
    Will probably buy the Dinse connectors from arc-zone since there they sell a set of black/Red for ground and electrode.

    Also since I need a cart to put oxy/acet tanks on when I start renting them from AirGas, I found this wide dolley at harbor freight.
    http://www.harborfreight.com/extra-w...uck-66171.html

    I had a 20% off coupon so that helped. With the width of this dolley, there will be very little to be modified to handle the 2 tanks.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    601

    Default

    Glad you got started spending some money.
    Just wondering how that HF cart is ? Did you look at welding tank carts ?

    I prefer the tank cart where the cylinders are in front of each other instead of side to side.
    http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...electedIndex=0

    http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...electedIndex=0

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sweetwater, TX
    Posts
    201

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BD1 View Post
    Glad you got started spending some money.
    Just wondering how that HF cart is ? Did you look at welding tank carts ?

    I prefer the tank cart where the cylinders are in front of each other instead of side to side.
    http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...electedIndex=0

    http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...electedIndex=0
    I did look at welding tank carts at AirGas and WestAir. The cheap cart AirGas sales would have only held cylinders about knee high, not the #4 Acet and 150 Oxygen I am looking at. The next cart they had was over $150.

    Went to WestAir and their carts, while better made with steel wheels had a starting price pushing $200. The guy there asked if it would be for industry or home shop use and said for home shop use he recommended just getting a HF hand truck and modifying it. He showed me their modified HF hand truck they used just for moving tanks. He said the carts they sale are more for OSHA regulations and that is why they were so expensive.

    I already had 20ft of 2" strap in the shop so I already have the material I will need for modifying the HF hand truck.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sweetwater, TX
    Posts
    201

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BD1 View Post
    Glad you got started spending some money.
    Just wondering how that HF cart is ? Did you look at welding tank carts ?

    I prefer the tank cart where the cylinders are in front of each other instead of side to side.
    http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...electedIndex=0

    http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...electedIndex=0
    BD1, I have never seen a cylinder cart with one in front of the other, that seems like a lot of leverage against you while lifting them.

    In my parents shop they always had a cart like this.
    http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...electedIndex=0

    I really like the steel wheels, but a little too pricey right now. I think the HF cart will suit my needs well for my little shop.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    601

    Default

    ''BD1, I have never seen a cylinder cart with one in front of the other, that seems like a lot of leverage against you while lifting them.''

    you would think so. Actually no difference from a standard cart. Seems odd but no problem.
    we had some of those STEEL WHEEL carts at work. Great for outside work.

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