Quote Originally Posted by taylorkh View Post
I recently upgraded from a Diversion 165 to a Dynasty 200 DX - primarily for its pulse capability. Of course I also got a WHOLE LOT of other tweak and adjustment capabilities. The owner's manual tells me HOW to adjust various parameters but does not tell me much about the interrelation between the setting. For example...

If I adjust the shielding gas pre-flow in the "Advanced Functions" menu it seems like it effects the operation when I am operating the machine in "manual" mode with a foot pedal rather than a programmed welding scenario operated with an on/off push button.

On the other hand, if I change the tungsten size selection does that change the startup performance if I am using a foot pedal for amperage control?

Perhaps someone from Miller can chime in if there is some "engineering" documentation available for this welder.

TIA,

Ken
If I adjust the shielding gas pre-flow in the "Advanced Functions" menu it seems like it effects the operation when I am operating the machine in "manual" mode with a foot pedal rather than a programmed welding scenario operated with an on/off push button.
***I'd suspect a careful study of the owner's manual would reveal.

On the other hand, if I change the tungsten size selection does that change the startup performance if I am using a foot pedal for amperage control?
***Yes, the arc start characteristics are tailored for the electrode size. Selecting an electrode size smaller than the electrode used will give a softer start. The specific arc start parameters can be all be tweaked by going into the 'GEn' electrode selection, per below.
The owner's manual details this:
Page 38
6-2. Programmable TIG Start Parameters
A. Tungsten Selection

Preset TIG Start Parameters
Use Encoder control to select a tungsten size from the following: .020, .040, .062
(1/16 in.), .094 (3/32 in.), or .125 (1/8 in.)(.094 is the default). When one of the listed tungsten sizes is selected, the following TIG starting parameters are preset: Amperage, Start Time, Start Slope Time, and Preset Amperage Minimum. There are a separate set of parameters for AC and DC (to select polarity see Section C). If it is necessary or desired to manually set the TIG starting parameters, turn the encoder until [GEN] is displayed on the amps meter (see Section B).

***In answering your question, it appears that you need to spend more time with the owner's manual

Perhaps someone from Miller can chime in if there is some "engineering" documentation available for this welder.
***Typically, the end users of equipment know more about the operation of it than the factory does or cares to know. Welding machines are no exception.

***Below are some of your excerpted comments and replies; with this one statement finally cutting to the gist of what you're after:
'If I can learn WHAT parameters I want for a particular situation, I can figure out HOW to establish those parameters in the Dynasty.'

***IOW, You're saying that if you can learn what you need to be looking for in the arc and the puddle for a given joint, given material, given position.....then--You'll be above to figure out how to setup the Dynasty to do that......uuumm...that's called 'experience'. It's up to you to be able to control the arc, throw the heat, read and work the puddle.

There are often, more that one way to setup and weld with a Dynasty and get decent results, depending on the user's own preferences and quirks! Some ways are more effective and efficient than others--but some end users could care less.

The owner's manual tells me HOW to adjust various parameters but does not tell me much about the interrelation between the setting.

What I am after is to sort out which parameters are adjustable when using the machine with a remote amperage control vs. which parameters only function if I use a start/stop welding program. At least that is my task at the moment.
***Again, I'll bet the owner's manual discusses. I always use a remote.

While I can sympathize with him to some extent, from the customer's point of view I guess I would translate this to "We are going to sell you a $4,000 - $14,000+ welder with a zillion features but don't ask us to give you more than the most rudimentary documentation." Had I come across the sticky thread first it would have given me pause before purchasing the Dynasty. End of rant.
***From what I've seen of other manufacturer's setup documentation---Miller does far more. Miller is also customer friendly to the small user and has built it's biz over the decades, on poor service by the big boys-Lincoln in particular.

To get back on a positive note... Does anyone know of any good generic textbooks about inverter TIG welders? ***Nope---You need to also realize that setup parameters are often regarded as proprietary data, not to be shared with competitors or anybody. Many of the folks on this site are more charitable.
The un-academic venues like this site, Welding tips & tricks dot com and Welding Web actually can further one's training from real world, end user experience.


I looked at the AWS web site but their bookstore search seemed only to search the standards. If I can learn WHAT parameters I want for a particular situation, I can figure out HOW to establish those parameters in the Dynasty.
p.s. Actually I have seen the first one which in fact contains all of the other ones. It is included on a DVD with the machine. I did not recognize the individual video names at first glance. Decent BASIC info but it does not go into the more advanced programming features.

***Reviewing the basics shown--helps. There's more Miller videos on this site that give a good starting point, from which one can start fine tuning. The Chris Razor videos, in particular-to me, are quite revealing on what can be done with AC arc focus setup---welding on a massive AL engine block with 3 /32 electrode--around 230 amps. [In 1997, I showed Miller factory, road show guys--AC arc focusing on sharp tungsten on AL plate welding, on their 700A machine. Fast forward to 2000, Miller finally realized that AC arc focusing, using an inverter was actually a selling point and began advertising the same.....quoting myself from above 'Typically, the end users of equipment know more about the operation of it than the factory does or cares to know. Welding machines are no exception.']