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  1. #11

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    Finally went out to take another look at my generator,and I am no expert,and I cannot find the problem. After reading the responses to my question,I thought I would look at it again. And I want to thank everyone for their help and hope you all can bear with me on this.Here is how it is wired. A red and blue come from one set of windings to give 120 volts and a white and a rust brown colored wire come out of the other winding to give it the other 120 volts. The red (being the hot then goes to the top of one side of a breaker and the rust colored,being the hot,ends up going to the top of the other side of the breaker. Looks like a double breaker,each side protecting its respective windings. Then two red wires come out the bottom of the breaker below where the red went in the top,and one goes to one dual 120 volt outlet,while the other red goes to the hot lug of the 240 volt outlet. Then below where the rust colored hot wire went in the top of the breaker, a set of black wires,being the hot,come off the bottom of the breaker,with one going to another 120 volt dual outlet,and then the other black goes to the other hot lug on the 240 volt outlet. I can't see the problem based on the answers I got initially,it looks wired OK,but as I said I am no expert and the problem might be right in front of me. The way it is wired to the 240 volt receptacle,the way I see it,I thought I should have my 240 volts. And of course the neutrals and ground is wired in where necessary. As I said when I first relayed my problem,when I check all the outlets,the 120 volt outlets are all fine but the 240 volt outlet gives a zero reading when I check across the two hot lugs. But if I check the hot lugs individually by touching one hot and then a neutral or a ground,I get120 volts, the same goes for the other hot lug,touching it along with either the neutral or the ground I get 120 volts with my tester. This last sentence pertains to the 240 volt outlet. I actually had a couple farmers tell me that is how it is supposed to work,I told them no way you need to have 240 volts when touching both hot lugs with a tester or nothing will run off that outlet. I proved that to them by trying to start my 240 volt buzzbox with this generator,and nothing happens. I tried to start the buzzbox with my portable welder and it started fine. And my portable welder reads 240 volts by just checking the hot lugs with my tester. Any help is appreciated guys. Thanks again.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    402

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    Do you have 240v at the input to the breaker?-Meltedmetal

  3. #13

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    I checked the wiring of my generator against the schematic,and it is wired correctly. I checked at the 240 volt outlet,at the top of the breaker where both 120 volt hot wires hook to,and at the end of the generator where the two120 volt hot wires come out from the windings,and at no point anywhere do I have 240 volts. I have two sets of 120 volts,but nowhere do I have 240 volts.I'm thinking it must be an internal problem,which I have no idea what it is. And to be sure of myself I checked everything out multiple times. Anyone have any ideas,if nothing else I can still use it as a 120 volt generator. Thanks everyone.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    402

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    If your commons (blue and white from the windings are indeed connected in common some where to the same point then I would have to guess that when it was "reconditioned" they found one set of windings open and slipped a wire in to make it look like they were using both sets of windings when it reality they are only using one and you really only have a 120v generator that is half the rated total capacity. Any way to easily separate the winding and check them for continuity/shorts separately?
    Meltedmetal

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Posts
    7,909

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    OK, seems obvious now, all you have to do is stick a voltmeter probe into one of the 230 receptacles phases, and with the other probe stick it into the 120 Vac receptacles till you come up with 230.

    Then you have the wire you need to complete the 230 on the 230 receptacle. you will need to trace it (the winding that supplys it) and r/r it with one thats already in your 230 breaker though won't matter which one as they are both on the same phase anyways.

    You don't need a diagram and its very simple to do....

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    402

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    Cruizer,
    Would I be correct if I thought what you are saying is that one of the sets of windings is connected back to front thereby shifting its phase by 180 degrees so that it opposes the output of the other windings so as to cancel its output rather than compliment that output to produce 220v? Would the OP expect to find 0v across his hot sides of his two 120v outlets when there should be 220v there? And lastly if he plugged in ,say a 120v work light into each of his 120v outlets(thereby connecting the windings via the bulbs and commons would they light?
    Meltedmetal

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Posts
    7,909

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    Quote Originally Posted by Meltedmetal View Post
    Cruizer,
    Would I be correct if I thought what you are saying is that one of the sets of windings is connected back to front thereby shifting its phase by 180 degrees so that it opposes the output of the other windings so as to cancel its output rather than compliment that output to produce 220v? Would the OP expect to find 0v across his hot sides of his two 120v outlets when there should be 220v there? And lastly if he plugged in ,say a 120v work light into each of his 120v outlets(thereby connecting the windings via the bulbs and commons would they light?
    Meltedmetal
    Sorta, kinda, Not sure on the bulb idea, ss it doesn't care as long as there is a neutral and a hot to run it.

    Problem is on his single phase that the 2 hots are on the same phase, thus cancell each other out, so instead of getting the required 230, he's getting zero.

    Easy to find the missing phase though as its likely attached to one of the 120 receptacles

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    402

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    Thanks- Just trying to get a picture in my head of what is going on there. Too bad he's so far away as it might be fun to stick a dual trace scope on there to get a visual. Take care.
    Meltedmetal

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Posts
    7,909

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    Not a pure sine wave, so a scope would be pretty much useless, a simple AC voltmeter could dignose the problem, and solution quickly though

  10. #20

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    Cruizer, I checked the generator out with my voltage tester by inserting the probe into one of the hot lugs on my 240 volt outlet and the other into the hot lug of the 120 volt outlet and all I get is 120 volts by checking both hot lug on the 240 volt outlet with a hot on either 120 volt outlet. I am stumped. As I said I can use this as a 120 volt generator. That is what I get for buying a cheap generator. I bought our daughter a Generac,I guess I should have bought one for myself too. I heard they are the best, using copper internally,where the cheaperbrands use aluminum. Anyway, I am thinki g something must be screwed up inside the generator. Any and all help is appreciated.

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