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Thread: Welder training

  1. #1
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    Default Welder training

    My son and I are investigating schools/programs that offer intensive welder training. By intensive I mean a compressed completion schedule as opposed to what you might find at a tech/voc school. We're located in Central New Jersey just north of Trenton. Any ideas? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
    My son and I are investigating schools/programs that offer intensive welder training. By intensive I mean a compressed completion schedule as opposed to what you might find at a tech/voc school. We're located in Central New Jersey just north of Trenton. Any ideas? Thanks.
    What process and metals is your son interested in? What fields?

    Welding is one career that takes years of intense practice to master. School just touches the basics as far as the application goes. What I see most students losing out on is theory, math, geometry , metalurgy, and design.

    What I would do is try to find a community college that offers a 2 year in Welding technology. While going to school, work part time if he can find work, either flipping burgers or metal munching. Eventually,(4 to 6 years) he will have gained(or not) the knowlegde if this is the field he wants to persue. If not he can tranfer or branch out to many aspects of manufacturing.

    My son started work in my shop at age 11. Deburring parts and tack welding subassemblies until he was 18. He learned blueprint reading, tig welding, and mig welding, as well as bridgeport machining and CNC plasmacutting. Then he went off to Community College to gain his transfer degree while working and getting his welding certifications. He studied autocad design programming, architecture, higher math, and physics. He then applied and was accepted to Cal Poly San Luis Obispo in their Industrial Technology program. Since graduating he landed a job working at SpaceX as a Friction stir technician welding fuel cells for their launch rockets. He also takes test samples of the welds, forwards them for destructive and non destructive testing, and catologs the results for later review if required.

    There is a lot to welding. A compressed program would only be money down the sewer IMO. My kid chose aerospace welding.
    Nothing welded, Nothing gained

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  3. #3
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    Thanks. Unfortunately, I can only tell you what he's not interested in doing and that's hard core production work. Ultimately, I think he's looking to settle down in an independent shop which does a lot of specialty work.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
    Thanks. Unfortunately, I can only tell you what he's not interested in doing and that's hard core production work. Ultimately, I think he's looking to settle down in an independent shop which does a lot of specialty work.
    How old is he? Does he have any hobbies?

    Hard core production work is a state of mind. What some people call production work others call their dream job. I have a lady working for me that trained in fluxcore structural and pipe. She could not find a job and applied with me. She is now doing production tig alum welding at a bench. Works out well because she can work flexible hours because she is a single mom.
    Nothing welded, Nothing gained

    Miller Dynasty700DX
    3 ea. Miller Dynasty350DX
    Miller Dynasty200DX
    ThermalArc 400 GTSW
    MillerMatic350P
    MillerMatic200 with spoolgun
    MKCobraMig260
    Lincoln SP-170T
    Linde UCC305 (sold 2011)
    Hypertherm 1250
    Hypertherm 800
    PlasmaCam CNC cutter
    Fadal Toolroom CNC Mill
    SiberHegner CNC Mill
    2 ea. Bridgeport
    LeBlond 15" Lathe
    Haberle 18" Cold Saw
    Doringer 14" Cold Saw
    6 foot x 12 foot Mojave granite

  5. #5
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    He's 22 and just graduated from Syracuse University with an economics degree. He's the only one of our five kids who shouldn't have gone to a four year college. He absolutely hated it and had an extremely difficult time making it through. I'm very proud of him for persevering the way he did but it was painful for Mom and I to see him struggle the way he did. If it wasn't for his fraternity friends, he would have never made it to graduation.

    Hobbies? He's a fixer. Always looking for things that are broken and trying to come up with better design ideas for the things that do break.
    Last edited by spindrift; 08-29-2012 at 02:50 PM.

  6. #6
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    I'd have to ask his age as well.

    What I get from this is that he wants to learn fast (impossible in a welding trade)

    And then he wants to make huge$$, in specialty welding.

    Best of luck....

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
    Hobbies? He's a fixer. Always looking for things that are broken and trying to come up with better design ideas for the things that do break.
    Well congratulations to your son for fighting through it rather than throwing in the towel - seems he has learned more from the college experience than just economics - life lessons on digging in and getting it done. I can't say I agree with some others on their surmations of his aspirations to learn quickly and make big bucks custom welding. I think there's an eagerness to get into the environment and learn what appears to be an interest - I can relate. I have yet to weld but came excessively close to spending 4 digits on a machine I have no need for or even know how to use (yet - 14 days and counting till class guys!!! ) on more than one occassion!

    Sounds to me like he should have been an engineer. I was a mechanical engineer out of school - and I worked as a mechanical engineer for about 5 years - then migrated into information technology. Get him onto the board himself - these guys reply because they are good guys and have a LOT to share. Perhaps if he can start a thread about his interests these guys can shed new light on areas he didn't even consider.....a lot of experience with those that have replied - who are 'getting it done' and making a living by it...a lot to receive for free around here!

    Good luck to you and your son ......

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by cruizer View Post
    I'd have to ask his age as well.

    What I get from this is that he wants to learn fast (impossible in a welding trade)

    And then he wants to make huge$$, in specialty welding.

    Best of luck....
    Please don't assume anything. In this particular case you're dead wrong. If you have something constructive to add to the discussion then by all means continue to follow the thread. And how did you arrive at the conclusion that he wanted to make big bucks...jeez.

    Neither one of us is a professional welder; obviously. My thinking was that the sooner he gain some skill the quicker he would be able to land some kind of a job. What I do know about welding it's that practice, practice, practice is the only way.

    Cruizer, if I thought I had all the answers, I wouldn't have looked for this forum in the first place. I'm trying to help a kid that has no idea as to what direction to go in. Constructive advice would be greatly appreciated.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jfk92 View Post
    Well congratulations to your son for fighting through it rather than throwing in the towel - seems he has learned more from the college experience than just economics - life lessons on digging in and getting it done. I can't say I agree with some others on their surmations of his aspirations to learn quickly and make big bucks custom welding. I think there's an eagerness to get into the environment and learn what appears to be an interest - I can relate. I have yet to weld but came excessively close to spending 4 digits on a machine I have no need for or even know how to use (yet - 14 days and counting till class guys!!! ) on more than one occassion!

    Sounds to me like he should have been an engineer. I was a mechanical engineer out of school - and I worked as a mechanical engineer for about 5 years - then migrated into information technology. Get him onto the board himself - these guys reply because they are good guys and have a LOT to share. Perhaps if he can start a thread about his interests these guys can shed new light on areas he didn't even consider.....a lot of experience with those that have replied - who are 'getting it done' and making a living by it...a lot to receive for free around here!

    Good luck to you and your son ......
    Actually, he started off in the engineering school but couldn't keep his grades up so he had to transfer into Arts and Sciences.

    Thanks for the good wishes.

  10. #10
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    Well, get him enrolled in the 2 year tech course, then apprentice under a certified/journeyman tradesman.

    There are no easy anwers, nor a quick way to learn this trade.

    Wasn't trying to be sarcastic, just trying to figure out your post.

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