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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    5

    Default Learning to TIG in Chicago ??

    After working (playing!) with MIG for a while on stainless/mild/alum, I got cocky and bought a Dynasty 200DX.. I've wasted countless hours and bottles of Argon burning through various metals and I can't weld with this thing worth a crap. Any advice on what/where I can get some good info/training to properly use this? I'd really like to do some beatiful work on stainless & alum, but I guess I have to learn to crawl before I can walk here...

    Any recommendations on online courses, videos, community colleges or seminars in or around Chicago? Any tips on what the best course for learning would be? I've seen classes ranging from $900 - $2200 and while I'd rather not spend the upper end of that range, I guess I'll do what I have to... I'd appreciate any advice you guys can offer. If learning from videos/books is realistic, that would be nice too. Thanks!

    Rob

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Lafayette, La
    Posts
    319

    Default

    Rob

    You can learn tig without going to a class but it just takes longer. Short of that, you can seek out an experienced tig welder who would spend a few hours with you (for liquid compensation) and save hours and $$ in wasted time and effort. That's what I would do. A knowledgeable welder could watch and guide you and have you doing proficient welding in a few hours.
    Do some homework first though to take advantage of any lessons offered. Understand the process and learn the filler requirements and amp settings from reference materials here on line or from Miller's tech library. Get the student package for around $25. It's a **** of a deal.
    Build something, anything. I find it really gives you a boost when you're trying to do a project to make the welds hold and look good because it's a reflection of your craftsmanship.
    Remember, no practice is wasted time if you learn something from every weld bead. The only bad thing about having one of the best machines on the market is.....you can't blame the machine for bad welds.
    Good luck.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ocean City, Maryland
    Posts
    951

    Default

    Tig is sort of like welding with a torch. Just you have way more control of your heat. Most people who have "gas" welded have little difficulty TIG welding. Although MIG is the great, No one should learn to weld with MIG first. It spoils and really doesn't teach you to weld. Learning to weld, you should start with Gas, [welding, brazing, soldering etc] then sm.a.w [stick] then G.M.A.W [MIG] then maybe G.T.A.W [tig]. If you just started welding with Mig and now moved to Tig, the learning curve will be longer but not impossible. There are lots of books you can read and after you set up the machine the rest is you. You have a great machine. Just my opinon on all the above of course. good luck. Have fun
    Scott
    HMW [Heavy Metal welding]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thanks for the advice, guys. I ordered the Miller Student package, that does seem like a lot of stuff for $25...I tried some more welds today, and made a few good ones. I think I'm gonna follow WB5JHY's advice and see if I can find someone skilled at TIG to work with me for a couple hours, to make sure I have my hand movements down, and so I know how to read the puddle better...

    Rob

  5. #5

    Default

    I would also recommend the book "Welding Principles and Applications" fifth edition by Larry Jeffus - it's not cheap - worth every cent.

    Steve

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Hey Steve...looks like the reviewers on amazon agree with you! I ordered it (from buy.com, 10% cheaper than amazon). Thanks for the tip. I'm getting a bit better on the steel, still a little confused on exactly what to do with the torch after the puddle starts. Do you move the puddle in a straight line? Pull back as you add the filler, pause it, move it in circles, or just keep it moving at a steady rate? It seems like all those get the job done, but whats the right way to do it?

    thx

    Rob

  7. #7
    Gihfuk Guest

    Default

    Too early...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Aurora, IL USA
    Posts
    1

    Default

    HTP over in Arlington Heights holds a "beginner TIG" class every month or so; give Jeff Noland a call over there, he can give you the details. It was a good newbie introduction to basic TIG welding with an inverter rig for my wife and I. I don't remember specifically, but I think the class was either $75 or $100.
    -Ed
    Felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    5

    Default Learning to Tig

    To answer bfloyd4445's question. Start with steel. If you want to try aluminum you might want to step up to 1/4" plate and remember; as heat builds in the piece your travel speed will have to increase, unless you've got a foot pedal and can reduce amperage.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Sacramento Ca, and Drain Oregon
    Posts
    32

    Default

    Thanks hilruner. good advice. Aluminum gets shinny lookin and then its gone<smile>. I've made a few nice holes in aluminum with a torch, aint at all like steel. I haven't yet even tried to mig aluminum, shoot, just recently learned how to make a half way decent looking bead with good penetration with a mig< lincoln 175plus> on steel. Took me awhile to get the hang of migs automatic feeding of the filler material. I think tig will be easier for me because its more like gas welding even though the experts say its harder to learn.

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