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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Panhandle, FL
    Posts
    8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bodybagger
    It's wired great. Just remember that when you need a longer cord (which will be very soon since you'll be eager to drag it around and weld different stuff around the house), the cheapest way to go is to get a new 10 gauge Yellow-Jacket extension cord from Lowes or Home Depot and just cut the 120V ends off. The 100' cord costs like 92 dollars at Lowes, so you're literally getting the 10 gauge wire for HALF the price (92 cents per foot) of buying it by the foot. If you are strapped for money, you could get the 50' extension cord which costs roughly half.
    i wont be draging it around till i make a cart for it(my first project), as its just a tad heavy to be carrying it wherever i feel. as for the cord, i had looked for a 25'er in 10g but the smallest was 50' for 55 bucks and right now thats just a tad to much, as so far with helmet, gloves, welder, and plugs i am at 950 bucks. maybe next paycheck.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bodybagger
    Cut the socket end at least 1 foot from the plug and save it. Strip it and connect it inside the welder plug and you will have a HANDY (and free) 120V outlet on the end of your welder extension cord to run grinders cutoff saws etc. And since it's fused at 30A or higher, it will eliminate nuisance trips... (my DeWalt cutoff saw trips enough 20A breakers at startup to be a headache).

    Just be carefull to twist the green and white wires of your 1' stubby lead together and connect them to the center prong of your welder outlet, and connect the black wire of your stubby plug to either of the energized legs. DO NOT connect green to green, white to white, black to black, or you will have 240V on your 120V plug and you will instantly kill any grinder you try to run from it. And yes, it is a "dummy ground" - not OSHA approved. But neither is your cord anyway because it doesn't have sealed molded plugs.
    hmmmm, i was always taught not to wire a 15/20 amp plug to a 30a circuit, and especially not to a 110v leg of a 220v line, perhaps thats why i never heard of tying the ground and neutral together to tap off of a 220v feed. but obviously if one were to do that, seeing as its an older style without neutral, one would have to do something to get a neutral connected(think i'll leave that part alone).

    Quote Originally Posted by Bodybagger
    Break your extension cord into 50' lengths because it is HEAVY and hundred footers don't wind neatly... they tend to knot up.

    This will hve you welding all over the place!
    oh yeah, i know the feeling of heavy wires, have any clue how much about 3k christmas lights wound on a single spool weight? lol

    Ratt

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bodybagger View Post
    Just be carefull to twist the green and white wires of your 1' stubby lead together and connect them to the center prong of your welder outlet, and connect the black wire of your stubby plug to either of the energized legs. DO NOT connect green to green, white to white, black to black, or you will have 240V on your 120V plug and you will instantly kill any grinder you try to run from it.
    I would advise against doing this idea especially when 120V outlets are easy to plug into. If someone is going to bother hooking up an extension cord for 240V its not a big deal to get out a 120V extension cord too.

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