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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Montgomery Mi
    Posts
    223

    Default what would u do ?

    Quote Originally Posted by FabTech View Post
    Dave, is this the same a supervisor that burned his arm, you were telling us about?
    FabTech, no this is not but he has burnt himself on things that I've welded, the one that burnt his arm was my original boss when I started work there about 3-4yrs ago and he was the one that called me wanting me to come back to work for them and I told him it would cost them for me to think about it & he said whats it going to take for you to come back here to work for me? so I told him what I was looking for in the way of $$ he then told me ok because we kno3w you can do the job better then any other welders we have had so when can you start, but he his also the one who got hooked up with the girl on meth and the became involved with it as well we always got along great as far as talking about hunting,fishing,weightlifting things like that I forgot it also made the other guys in the shop ticked because we always seem to be talking but I still got the job done on time and NO I DO NOT SUCK A@@ WITH THE BOSS.
    Last edited by safetydave; 02-10-2008 at 02:12 PM.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Montgomery Mi
    Posts
    223

    Default what would u do?

    Quote Originally Posted by Engloid View Post
    My answers to the boss would have been:

    1) Rework is more expensive than doing the job right the first time. My work doesn't require as much rework.

    2) Can we reflect upon the party that decided to pay me this much, and get their reasoning for it?

    3) If he's as good as I am, why isn't he making as much as I am?

    4) If you want to pay me what you pay him, expect the same work you get out of him. Fair is fair.
    Hi engloid and yes I did ask these questions and the guy that runs this company said to me that he has to go by what the super says, even though when we do our rate sheets for the week I make a copy of what I weld so that it matchs up with what the list of trailers are for each production run just incase there might be any ? as to who and what was welded & it clearly shows how much was built & how much money wise I have lost over a period of time untill I left. The production boss knew what my qualifications were that is why they called me to come back to work for them because they didn't have any one that could do the job to the standards they wanted.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    So. Cal
    Posts
    335

    Default As an employer..

    A good welder is hard to come by. Let me say that again. A GOOD welder is hard to come by. Employers that play tag with employees pay and position are not worth working for in any event. A good employer understands talent and what is required to recruit, maintain and retain quality employees. From what I have read, this is not the case and your leaving is justified as the situation would likely end in despair anyway. An employer of any shop large or small should have wage/salary policies in place that are based on several factors as they relate to his/her business. The bottom line is that employers are in the game to make money in which they are entitled to but when and how they make this money depends on how well that employer runs his/her business affairs and the treatment of quality employees is critical for success.

    Around here, welders get a reputation for their skills not only as a welder but how well they get along with others, how well they treat the employers customers and of course honesty and loyalty. I could go on forever, tell you what has made my shop successful etc., but the end result is an old metaphor: "A fair days wage for a fair days work". It's old but still applies and any employer or employee that refuses to play by this old rule is destine to failure.

    TacMig
    We depend On:
    Miller | Esab | Lincoln | Fronius
    Baileigh | Drake | Eagle | Knuth
    Victor | Harris | Smith | Bessey
    Snap-On | Hilti | Ingersoll Rand
    Burco/Koco | Onan | BobCat
    Tracker | Infratrol | AmeriCast

    We belong to or support:
    American National Standards Institute
    American Welding Society
    The Welding Institute
    Fabricators & Manufacturing Association Int'l.

    Anderson & Co. LLC
    Metal Cr
    afters

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,861

    Default

    SD-

    Go get a Biz Lic, etc etc and start makin' trailers.

    You are going to get all kinds of "The sky is Falling" crap about everyone in the world will try to sue you.

    Possible- sure but someone can sue you delivering a newspaper to your home

    Are you a good welder? Yes- don't worry- Ok worry some-

    Having your own business is enough worries.

    Good Luck.

    Ed

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,861

    Default

    Do not bad mouth your former employer.

    Your new employer sure does not want to hear it and any customers you may have, if you start your own Biz, do not want to hear it.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Fraser Valley, BC
    Posts
    593

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Broccoli1 View Post
    Do not bad mouth your former employer.

    Your new employer sure does not want to hear it and any customers you may have, if you start your own Biz, do not want to hear it.
    Very wise advice, you never know who knows who.
    Dynasty 200DX, first generation
    Makita 5" grinder
    Makita 14" abrasive saw
    IR SS5L compressor
    Whole bunch of hand/air tools.
    and a wish list a mile long

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Great advice, I'll add another thought from a different business, but the idea can have broad application to any new small business starting out.

    My sons started a business from scratch last year installing, finishing and refinishing hardwood floors. They have been building their business steadily, but still have excess capacity. Their closest competitor has been in the business for 20+ years, and because they are so well known, they often get overbooked. When they do, they call my sons and offload work to my sons' business. They have steered many, many $Ks of work to my boys, who gladly pull their (magnetic) business signs off their truck when they do those jobs. They are also very careful not to do anything that might be construed as "stealing" a customer, they build their business from their own advertising and promotions. In fact, their competitor's master installer has taught my youngest son everything about installation by hiring him, off and on, as a helper when he needs one to meet a deadline. It may be possible to build that kind of relationship with your competition, if you produce quality work, treat them with respect, and are careful not to burn any bridges.
    Bob

    That that is is that that is not is not.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    87

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BamaBob View Post
    Great advice, I'll add another thought from a different business, but the idea can have broad application to any new small business starting out.

    My sons started a business from scratch last year installing, finishing and refinishing hardwood floors. They have been building their business steadily, but still have excess capacity. Their closest competitor has been in the business for 20+ years, and because they are so well known, they often get overbooked. When they do, they call my sons and offload work to my sons' business. They have steered many, many $Ks of work to my boys, who gladly pull their (magnetic) business signs off their truck when they do those jobs. They are also very careful not to do anything that might be construed as "stealing" a customer, they build their business from their own advertising and promotions. In fact, their competitor's master installer has taught my youngest son everything about installation by hiring him, off and on, as a helper when he needs one to meet a deadline. It may be possible to build that kind of relationship with your competition, if you produce quality work, treat them with respect, and are careful not to burn any bridges.
    This is known as professional courtesy and I applaud it, you should be proud.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    328

    Default You have to move on sometimes

    I was working for a boat trailer mass manufacturer here and the shop supervisor knew very little about trailers. I think they got him from another branch of the company. His job was to turn up production while keeping labor costs the same. I was a wiring and step plate installer. We were supposed to literally run from one trailer to the next. Some of the trailer lights weren't even tested before shipping off!! When they started demanding 6 day workweeks, workers started being no shows on the sixth day. I worked my sixth day but made up my mind to move on to a better organized employer. The pays the same.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Default

    that mandatory 6 day weeks is just BS. ok so offer over time to those that want it . but don't force it on every one.
    my wife took a job as a seamstress making the pro football, hockey and B-Ball uniforms. she was hired on as part time 3 day a week. she literally got more done in 3 days then most do in 6 (the super told her that) but she was told she would have to do 60Hr weeks or they would let her go ??? how stupid is that ?? they were getting 60Hrs worth of work out of her and paying for 30 but that was just not enough for them. the wife loved the job but with a family she just cant be at work 10 Hrs a day for 6 days strait. it just wears her down and she is a real be-ouich. so as much as she loved the job she had to let them fire her. bummer really, wish they had never hired her in the first place. she really like the job. some people just cant to 60 Hrs and the employers should respect them.
    at some point you have to say being a team player is one thing, neglecting your self or your family is another.

    stand your ground and do whats right for you and your family. put this behind you and start fresh. i agree the new employer will not want to hear you bad mouthing the old one. let it go and move on.
    good luck
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

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