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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    10

    Default home made log splitter

    I am waiting for my hoses to show up, other than that its ready.




    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by moose13; 05-16-2011 at 08:03 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Traer, IA
    Posts
    317

    Default

    Looks good Moose! Curious what you made the splitting wedge out of and the hydraulic tank?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by willy View Post
    Looks good Moose! Curious what you made the splitting wedge out of and the hydraulic tank?
    Tank is just a piece of 3/8 x 16"pipe capped with ports welded in.
    Wedge is 1" steel with angle iron "kickers". I know most people use tool steel for these but i split all standing dead pine and have never had a problem with the lighter grade steel.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Traer, IA
    Posts
    317

    Default

    Cool - I figured the tank was pretty heavy with it supporting everything. Never been around one so I didnt know how the wedges were made. Again, nice job and keep your arms out of it

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Northern Vt, Franklin County
    Posts
    4

    Default

    I like that you made it high enough so you can stand up straight while using it. I've seen a lot of home made wood splitters built so low to the ground so as to force the user to stay perpetually bent over while using it. My back hurts just looking at the pictures!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    10

    Default

    I agree Ed, i am 6'5" so it is built to fit.
    I looked at one a guy had for sale the working height was 16"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    353

    Default High load bed...

    I run a splitter on occasion. I am grateful that I don't have to lift 500 pieces of wood 24" or more a day that weigh anywhere from 50lbs to 100lbs or more. I just tip the splitter up and roll the logs in place. Most of the store bought ones will split vertically and I prefer to use mine that way. Pine on the other hand would be no trouble to toss up on yours and that would be good too, so I think you made something that will work well for your needs. Thank you for sharing your project with us.

    One question, should the filter be run at an angle like that or is it better to be vertical?
    Last edited by Doughboyracer; 05-18-2011 at 10:40 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    10

    Default

    One question, should the filter be run at an angle like that or is it better to be vertical?

    I have seen them any which way. I will try to make it horizontal if possible, but the way my return runs currently i may have to go with this.
    Thanks guys!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    353

    Default Yes...

    I don't know for sure but was bringing it up because I know someone else knows but might not spot it, if it matters. I question it because to me it would seam to filter more uniformly if it were in a vertical arrangement like on a car or truck, but I guess I have seen them on their sides as well, or notů? I know my bike is.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Bossier Parish La.
    Posts
    503

    Default Filter placement

    If the filter were installed with the bottom toward the ground it would at least make less of a mess when it came time for a filter change. Also the filter could be prefilled with fluid and the pump would not be run dry for the restart. Hydraulic pumps are highly machined precision pieces of machinery and will not last long if run dry for any period of time. The hydraulic fluid serves to lubricate and cool the internals of the pump while in operation. Ideally the filter should be placed on the discharge side of the pump and not the suction side. If the filter becomes clogged during operation the pump becomes starved of fluid and loses all lubrication and cooling, quickly trashing the pump. Even new fluid has some contaminants in it and should be filtered as it is added.
    Last edited by Bistineau; 05-19-2011 at 10:00 AM.

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