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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    3,711

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gwiley View Post
    I have found that putting a single-lense halogen work light on my bench clears up the problem you have described. They are about $10 and work like magic. Only down side is that they chew up electricity.

    The single bulb halogen works I am familiar with are 500 watt lights. I find these tend to cause eye burn after welding all day if they are placed too near the work area. A work distance of 8 feet seems to make for easier viewing without hurting my eyes.

    My .02,

    HAWK

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Nolalu (near Thunder Bay) Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    42

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    Quote Originally Posted by Goodhand View Post
    A rule-of-thumb to determine the correct lens power is to measure the distance from eyes to work piece in meters. The reciprocal of that distance becomes the power of the lens to give the best focus. Example: a 0.25 (1/4) meter (10") distance converts to a +4.00 diopter lens . . . BTW... I'm a retired optometrist, and will be glad to entertain any questions.
    OK, I have a question. Why is it that the distance remains the same but with age the need for a different diopter shows up? Used to use a 1.5, then a 2 and now a 2.5
    Thanks in advance for your reply
    Gordie -- "I believe you understand what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    162

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nitesky View Post
    OK, I have a question. Why is it that the distance remains the same but with age the need for a different diopter shows up? Used to use a 1.5, then a 2 and now a 2.5
    Thanks in advance for your reply
    Focal length of the eye's lens changes with age. The magnification is based on the distance your eye is away from the object. The diopter correction just allows a normal focal length.

    This is for hyperopia and presbyopia. Far-sightedness and aging eyes. If that second term sounds like a Protestant faith, that is because that certain Christian belief system was founded in the elders leading the church.

    Cataracts are a problem in my family. And I already am hyperopic and on the cusp for being diagnosed with presbyopia. But I still feel young at heart.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Nolalu (near Thunder Bay) Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    42

    Default

    Thank you. Got a chuckle out of the explanation too.

    Must be complicated to figure out since I wear thick pop bottles for near-sightedness. Thankfully there are corrective lenses so I can attempt to weld
    Gordie -- "I believe you understand what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant."

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hazelwood Mo USA
    Posts
    462

    Default cataract surgery

    I am going to be a candidate for cataract surgery in the near future, I am wondering what the outcome will do to my welding. I do low amp tig work with 4.0 diopter reading glasses thru a speed glas autodarkening helment.

    My auto dark helmets do lack in clarity, I have a 100 watt shop light that I direct onto the work which helps.

    I am wondering if the cataract surgery will hinder my vision of the weld puddle etc., maybe put it off as long as possible?
    mike sr

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Montana, USA
    Posts
    234

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nitesky View Post
    OK, I have a question. Why is it that the distance remains the same but with age the need for a different diopter shows up? Used to use a 1.5, then a 2 and now a 2.5
    Thanks in advance for your reply
    The reason we require increases in the power of reading lenses is due to the gradual loss of focusing ability of the lenses in our eyes, which slowly become stiff, beginning in our 40's. Think of it as a trade-off with mother nature... most of us enjoy clear, sharp vision all of our lives, but lose the near auto-focus at middle age. When we attempt to focus from far to near the tiny muscles inside our eyes try to adjust the focus of the internal lenses, but since the lenses become stiff, they fail to respond... thus, we evolve to bifocals or readers.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Goochland, Va
    Posts
    32

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Goodhand View Post
    The reason we require increases in the power of reading lenses is due to the gradual loss of focusing ability of the lenses in our eyes, which slowly become stiff, beginning in our 40's. Think of it as a trade-off with mother nature... most of us enjoy clear, sharp vision all of our lives, but lose the near auto-focus at middle age. When we attempt to focus from far to near the tiny muscles inside our eyes try to adjust the focus of the internal lenses, but since the lenses become stiff, they fail to respond... thus, we evolve to bifocals or readers.
    Don't I know this….turned 42 this year, had to get my first set of progressive lenses when I was 40. Now, I notice that it is hard to shift from near/far work - eyes just don't want to focus. Especially bad if I spend a few hours staring hard at the computer screen - can't get a clear bead on my welding work afterward.

    It seems like a number of bodily functions change as we pass that magic big 4 - 0. I was a little alarmed at first, but hearing about issues from friends in their 60's+ tends to cheer me up a bit (for now).

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Boy, talk about getting some great informative answers to a question!! Wow!

    Anyways, 2 other things. First, my 3 month old auto-dark helmet decided to be obtuse and go dark all the time. Tried to make it work better and complained to vendor but finally with no good answers except a line of bull it sat on a shelf for 5 years. Couple of weeks ago I needed it so I tried again with the controls, changing all settings. It now is almost functional and it made quite a difference. Possibly you can adjust your settings or have someone else try out the helmet to make sure it's working right?

    The other thing is certain Rx prescriptions & supplements can have a dramatic change on vision and light sensitivity. If you changed any of that [Rx] in any way maybe do some research to see if that could be contributing?

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    14

    Default

    I had cataract surgery on the first eye August 11. Went from 20/80 to 20/20 overnight! Still need to schedule the next eye for a latter date, should be within the next month. So for now I still need to wear reading glasses. Only thing that changed for me is I had to go with one shade darker lens.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    5

    Default

    After my surgery, i found that my glasses missed the area about 24 inches from me. the bifocal was there closer and the eyeglasses picked up a foot or so beyond that. it was hard to weld or see sheet music on the stand in front of me, etc. i talked to the doctor and we ordered a different Rx to change the focal lenght. also ordered them in clear (no photogrey) as i would drop my helmet and I would be done welding before the lens could change to a lighter shade.

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