Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums
 
Miller Welding Discussion Forums - Powered by vBulletin

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Hybrid View

  1. #1

    Default Cataract surgery & resulting welding vision problems?

    Been having a heck of a time seeing my welds through my helmet.

    Never had a problem seeing where I'm going with my Mig before and been all over the place lately...but just realized that I had cataract surgery (both eyes) last year. Even bought a full face auto darkening adjustible mask. Too light of a setting...all I see is a bright ball, when I darkening it, the ball of light goes away...but I can't see where I'm going.

    I have several hood/masks...anyone else have this situation..or is just me? May need to use a spotlight on the welding area?????
    Love Them Old Chevys
    www.RustyBowtie.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    162

    Default

    I dislike auto darkening for that same reason, even the best of them tend to do that to my eyes. For GMAW/GTAW/FCAW, I don't see the benefit since these processes are trigger controlled. Or, in other words, only SMAW do I see the benefit of auto darkening as arc strikes can be limited to the weld area or lead-in pad, if used. When I used an automatic with triggered processes, I blinked when starting, eliminating the flash.

    I'm getting a good assortment of shades and eventually, a 1.5-2 power magnifier for the tiny stuff. I wear glasses as I am profoundly far sighted, my optometrist said I am one year from needing bifocals. I also have clip-on neutral density sunglasses I use to fine tune the welding shade, they are worth about 1/2 point which works well in the 40 amp and lower GTAW range with a shade 8 on the helmet.

    I believe the fixed focal length of your cataract surgery implanted lens is another issue you are dealing with. You might discuss this with your ophthalmologist.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    The GREAT State of Texas!
    Posts
    158

    Default

    I also have a problem seeing the puddle and I did have cataract surgery 2 years ago.

    I had never done any Tig welding before this last year so I have no reference but I find it hard as **** to see right.

    Mig is also giving me a problem.

    I had a variable 9-13 Hobart auto and just bought a Radnor wide view 7-13 auto. Still getting used to it but not real happy with it either, still can't see where I am going or the puddle. I do like the large viewing area tho. Getting frustrated but feel a little better knowing it is not just me.

    I am using 2.5 cheater lens in the helmet, same as with my old one.
    Roger Troue

    Retired since 2004

    Miller 211
    Miller 200 Syncro
    Miller 375 Extreme

  4. #4

    Default

    [QUOTE=Keith_J;269942]I dislike auto darkening for that same reason, even the best of them tend to do that to my eyes. For GMAW/GTAW/FCAW, I don't see the benefit since these processes are trigger controlled. Or, in other words, only SMAW do I see the benefit of auto darkening as arc strikes can be limited to the weld area or lead-in pad, if used. When I used an automatic with triggered processes, I blinked when starting, eliminating the flash.

    QUOTE]


    OK, but to rehash decades old information, automatic lenses provide 100% protection in the light shade. They don't have to turn to protect your eyes.
    So blinking may make you "feel" better but it doesn't do anything for your eyes.
    There may not be a benifit to you, but there are about a bunch of work situations where an auto lens makes the job much easier, faster and more pleasant for the welder.
    J
    Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    707

    Default

    I don't care what the label on the helmet says, my first generation helmet (called a DQF) would leave me with 'tired' eyes. This one have transition speeds like 1/2000 of a second.

    The Miller Elite and Digital Elite are much much more comfortable. They have an advertised switching speed of 1/20000 of a second and the digital elites have a sensor that will trigger when the high frequency of the TIG fist starts.

    Now, those of use past 40 will have difficulties focusing on close objects. I have used cheaters from 2.5 to 1.0 diopters. Right now, using the 1.0 - the 2.5 just made me too blind for anything else - kinda bothered me. However, the optometrist suggested around 2.0-2.5. They are cheap enough, I might try to experiment a little more.

    A couple things that will help. There are differences in auto-dark helmets. Try some others. I understand the coloration in the Optrels are really nice (slightly reduce viewing). The Miller's are less green than most, but I understand the Optrels are pretty much 'blue'.

    The other thing that really helps is clean lens (internal) and something covering the back of your head. That light coming in the back is worse than you can imagine. And if that something keeps your hair (what's left of it) from catching fire - bonus!
    Con Fuse!
    Miller Dynasty 350
    Millermatic 350P
    -Spoolmatic 30A

    Hypertherm PowerMax 1000G3
    Miller Multimatic 200 - awesome portable MIG (and stick and TIG)
    Miller Maxstar 200DX - portable TIG and stick

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    333

    Default

    have you ever tried to set the sensetivity?mine was ficking dark to late til i adjusted the sensetivty now it flips into dark mode right away.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    162

    Default

    [QUOTE=JTMcC;269950]
    Quote Originally Posted by Keith_J View Post
    I dislike auto darkening for that same reason, even the best of them tend to do that to my eyes. For GMAW/GTAW/FCAW, I don't see the benefit since these processes are trigger controlled. Or, in other words, only SMAW do I see the benefit of auto darkening as arc strikes can be limited to the weld area or lead-in pad, if used. When I used an automatic with triggered processes, I blinked when starting, eliminating the flash.

    QUOTE]


    OK, but to rehash decades old information, automatic lenses provide 100% protection in the light shade. They don't have to turn to protect your eyes.
    So blinking may make you "feel" better but it doesn't do anything for your eyes.
    There may not be a benifit to you, but there are about a bunch of work situations where an auto lens makes the job much easier, faster and more pleasant for the welder.
    J
    Protection doesn't always equal comfort. Or proper focus. Cataract surgery involves an implant which makes focusing difficult. Secondly, the ease of focusing is dependent on the light level and corresponding iris diameter, lower the light and the hyperfocal distance (range at which items are in focus) is markedly decreased. If you have ever used an SLR camera with a depth of field preview, you will note smaller aperture (higher F-stop) settings have greater depth of field. Or why portrait lenses (like a 105mm F 1.8 for 35mm) are so expensive (fast glass). The same axiom holds in your eyes for they are cameras of sorts.

    Another issue with many setups are internal reflections. Sure, mirror coatings are a good thing when pushing 150 amperes but for precise work, anti-reflective coatings help a BUNCH. Especially on eyeglasses. Same with a back cover on the head, if you can stand it. I'm lucky to work in AC comfort.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    488

    Default

    I wear a near-vision prescription and a distance prescription for driving. The driving glasses stay in my truck.

    The clarity of plain lenses works better for me than autodark.

    Agree with the backcover on the head. I glued a leather flap to my Pipeliner which works well.

    Also agree on additional light. The electricity use will be trivial compared to welding.

    I use a Shade 8 with a gold coating. By the time the light gets through the accumulated barriers (outer clear lens, tinted lens, inner clear lens, glasses) it's attenuated quite a bit.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Montana, USA
    Posts
    235

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BOWTIEGUY View Post
    Been having a heck of a time seeing my welds through my helmet.

    Never had a problem seeing where I'm going with my Mig before and been all over the place lately...but just realized that I had cataract surgery (both eyes) last year. Even bought a full face auto darkening adjustible mask. Too light of a setting...all I see is a bright ball, when I darkening it, the ball of light goes away...but I can't see where I'm going.

    I have several hood/masks...anyone else have this situation..or is just me? May need to use a spotlight on the welding area?????
    I suspect that the problem you're experiencing relates more to the power of the eyeglass lenses you use when welding, rather than the shade in the helmet. The appropriate lens power is determined by the distance your eyes are from the object you're trying to view. In effect... if your eye-to-work distance is 16", then a lens power of +2.50 diopters would most likely be best.

    Since I like to get close to my work, I prefer to clip on a +3.50 diopter halfeye flip-up. I did a little tig work, tonight, and could see the arc and bead perfectly. If I relied on just my progressive lenses, I would weld like a blind man.

    A rule-of-thumb to determine the correct lens power is to measure the distance from eyes to work piece in meters. The reciprocal of that distance becomes the power of the lens to give the best focus. Example: a 0.25 (1/4) meter (10") distance converts to a +4.00 diopter lens.

    The upper clip-on in the attached photo is my +3.50. It is the only one of that power I have left, and can't find a source for more. But, the lower, full-field clip-on can be modified to a halfeye by removing the lower half of the lenses. The good thing is that the full-field type is still available.

    BTW... I'm a retired optometrist, and will be glad to entertain any questions.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Goodhand; 08-03-2011 at 02:04 AM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Goochland, Va
    Posts
    32

    Default

    I have found that putting a single-lense halogen work light on my bench clears up the problem you have described. They are about $10 and work like magic. Only down side is that they chew up electricity.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Warning: Function split() is deprecated in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/footer.inc.php on line 82

Welding Projects

Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.