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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    5

    Default Speed boat seat frames

    Like to say a big hello to the forums, I've been lurking for a few years now, just never signed up....anyways.
    A friend wants me to build some seat brackets for his speed boat, and already bought all the "neccesary" material. He wants me to weld together a pair of 23" high seat brackets out of aluminum 1.25x1.25x.125 angle. I'm just not sure that this will be strong enough to be used for seat brackets for this boat(600 hp-ish).
    And chance this material will be able to take the abuse?
    The old sead brackets were just pre-bent 1/2x1.25 aluminum stock, no bracing of whatnot. I was gonna link the top and bottom, and add cross bracing throughout.
    Thanks for any ideas and suggestions.
    Eric

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Deltaville, VA
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    I have no clue what you're talking about.

    What the heck kind of "seat bracket" is 23" tall.

    If you want help, you've got to do better explaining what it is you're trying to do.

    As far as if the metal is "strong enough", that has everything to do with how the "bracket" is designed. Sounds more like you're describing a seat frame than a seat bracket.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Sorry, I should expalin them a bit better.
    These are a combo "frame/bracket", that anchors the seat to the floor of the boat. When completed, they will be 24 inches tall, 21 inches wide, and 20 inches deep, with a latching mechanism that allows the seat bottom to fold down and allow the user to stand upright and operate the controls of the boat. There is also a seperate 1/2 x 1.25 "strap" that the back of the seat will rest against, however, it is only held to the seat with a piece of cloth, and not anchored to the actual seat.
    Yes, I understand that frame design is critical to the strength of the overall structure, I am just curious as to whether it would be wise to use 1.25x1.25x1/8 aluminum angle for a frame that will be 24" tall, and whether the metal will have the vibration resistance to not crack around the floor anchor points, as well as the seat mounting points.
    I was thinking that some type of aluminum tubing would be a better choice, like 3/4" aluminum conduit for the legs, with a 1/4" thick base, as well as horizontal supports from front to back, and perhaps a x-brace or simple diagonal brace across the back.

    Thanks again.
    Eric

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Deltaville, VA
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    Eric,

    Nothing personal, but you're asking questions that indicate a lack of understanding of the stresses involved and necessary for the proper design of the leaning post/seating setup.

    Over the years I have run performance boats by Cigarette, Apache, Fountain, etc, etc, and I've never seen a leaning post/seat that used square tubing. Larger diameter round tube is used for additional strength and also to avoid the sharp corners found on square tube.

    An absolutely stable support is critical when operating a boat such as this at high speed. Oftentimes in this sort of performance boat you employ both a driver and a throttleman. When the driver is also controlling the throttles/trim, adequate support is critical.

    Do you really have the background to be designing and fabricating a structure that could cost a life if it fails.


    PS. After sleeping on this one, I'm further convinced that you're "in over your head" on this project. NO qualified fabricator is going to use "aluminum conduit" to build bolsters for a performance boat. If you study the stand up bolsters with drop down seating that Fountain uses on their boats, you'll have a better idea about where I'm coming from. Flawed design coupled with inexperienced fabrication is a sure fire disaster.
    Last edited by SundownIII; 07-17-2011 at 10:40 AM. Reason: Additional thoughts
    Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
    Dynasty 200 DX
    Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
    Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
    Hobart HH187
    Dialarc 250 AC/DC
    Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
    Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
    PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
    Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
    Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
    More grinders than hands

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    5

    Default

    I'm glad you feel that way.
    I thought about it, and am going to build it in a manner that i feel will be safe, reliable, and strong.
    Since this conversation is going nowhere, and arguing this point over the internet is useless, this topic is dead. I'll stick to lurking from now on.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    812

    Default

    Don't go off all butthurt now! If you only lurk you can't ask questions and get intelligent responses. Sundownlll was giving good advice, you need to be a little thick skinned around this bunch, but you will get good advice and sometimes more than you wanted or thought you needed.
    Miller Syncrowave 200
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