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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
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    9,881

    Default

    aluminum seems to eat up the filler. its less a dip and more of a push in some. i keep 3/32 and 1/8" the 3/32 is my fav.
    for realy little stuff i have some aluminum MIG wire.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Lightbulb

    do your best to keep it coverd also. from what i have heard the thing is packed way to full to be popping open to blow out. a cover will drastically reduce the amount of crap to accumulate inside it. just look at all the junk in the air wile grinding and sanding. after the first time i opened my MM135 to blow it out i started using a cover and it made a huge difference keeping it coverd when not in use.
    i'm planing on mt TA's 2nd or 3rd birth day (with me) to take it in to have it cleaned out by the service guys. to much $$ invested to risk a bo-bo over a $60 service fee.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Most likely in Florida
    Posts
    111

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fun4now View Post
    do your best to keep it coverd also.
    Roger wilco. Sounds like good advice. Thanks.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Default

    i like to keep my filler the same size as my tung. or close
    you will find the 3/32 to be the most used size in tung. as such 3/32" & 1/8" filler are most often used. however in a pinch use what ya have. i have twisted several pieces of the MIG wire together to get a size that worked when out of 3/32" filler. gotta do what ya gotta do.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    673

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by root View Post
    I also ordered some 1/16" aluminum rod since it matches roughly what I will be tinkering with. Maybe I should also pick up some 3/32" it sounds like? Why would the 3/32" be easier to weld with than the 1/16"?
    The idea in TIG is to melt a puddle, then dip your filler in that puddle. Dip, dip, dip, dip at about 1/2 second intervals. At my skill level, 1/16" rod will melt before you get it to the puddle. And by the time this happens, you'll have a melted hole in your 16ga. 3/32" has the mass to last long enough to get to the puddle. Don't forget, your arc length is only 1/8", this is very tight quarters. You're holding the rod about 8" to 10" from the end, it's wobbling and you've got an 1/8" target you're poking at (NOT THE ARC, next to it in the puddle). And, with every poke, your rod gets shorter. If ya poke the tungsten, guit, you're done. Nothing gets hurt, but the alum rod wicks onto the tung, turns your arc green, flashes a big black poof and contaminates any further weld. Regrind the tung to remove the alum blob, clean the 5" circle of ugly black soot off your project, and continue. Hand grinding is just fine, you don't need anything special. I use a 6" grinder with a fine regular wheel. A bench belt sander works too.

    OK, yer into me for $500. This is fun. How many more questions ya got??
    RETIRED desk jockey.

    Hobby weldor with a little training.

    Craftsman O/A---Flat, Vert, Ovhd, Horz.

    Miller Syncrowave 250.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Queens NY
    Posts
    1,547

    Default

    generally speaking i don't dip the rod when doing aluminum. i swipe the tip across the puddle at a very low angle. This seems to help avoid tung contamination and melting of the rod before it gets to the puddle. Its more of a circular motion than a back and forth. i find it much easier then dipping in and out.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    673

    Thumbs up

    Laiky: Thanks for joining in. As I've found, you can't say something without getting questions.
    Being self taught, tricks are hard to come by.

    Down, toward you, through the puddle?

    Or, up, away from you?

    Are you able to scratch it along the base metal, thru the puddle? This would help me stop the wobbling.

    PS OK, it's after midnight and I just saw this:
    "Its more of a circular motion than a back and forth."
    Last edited by Craig in Denver; 02-01-2008 at 12:10 AM. Reason: Added PS
    RETIRED desk jockey.

    Hobby weldor with a little training.

    Craftsman O/A---Flat, Vert, Ovhd, Horz.

    Miller Syncrowave 250.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Default

    Craig in Denver well put. it all looks so easy till you try to juggle it all at once, did you mention you are also working the foot peddle during all this to try to control the heat.

    i tend to tweak my torch back as i slid in the filler from the front.
    touching the filler to the work is fine, helps you get to the leading edge of the puddle before it melts. if you keep the filler at the front edge its in the gas flow but not so much heat as to melt away. you can also lay the filler over the joint and run the torch over it melting the filler into the joint. this makes thin stuff essayer as there is more mas for the arc to melt, making melt threw less likely. keep in mind you still have to make shore you get enough heat to melt the base metal or you are just melting filler on the joint, not a good thing. so be shore to keep the heat up and a large enough puddle to fuse the joint.
    a copper backing plate is helpful also, never tried it but its a good plan.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Most likely in Florida
    Posts
    111

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Craig in Denver View Post
    OK, yer into me for $500. This is fun. How many more questions ya got??
    Sorry. I think Laiky gets the $500. Thanks for playing.

    Excellent information from everybody. Very much appreciated.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    673

    Unhappy

    Quote Originally Posted by root View Post
    Sorry. I think Laiky gets the $500. Thanks for playing.



    Oh, I forgot about the pedal.
    RETIRED desk jockey.

    Hobby weldor with a little training.

    Craftsman O/A---Flat, Vert, Ovhd, Horz.

    Miller Syncrowave 250.

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