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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Exclamation welding takes time to learn right.

    PLEASE don't take this wrong. I'm new on here and don't want to get evicted.
    yea, thats not going to happen.LOL good to have ya with us.

    what they all say should be taken to heart. if you have a desire to learn and a teacher, TIG can be learned fairly quickly by some one with a fair amount of skill using there hands.
    if its about just building this one car/cooler and you have no teacher, i suspect your TA-185 will be on e-bay in a few months as you try to unload the POS.
    no its not a POS, but without proper teaching aluminum can be very,very,very frustrating. many give up on TIG all together due to it. it can act like apposing magnets as the bead's of the two pieces you are trying to weld will pull away from each other instead of melting into one. and thats just the start of the fun. did i mention its very frustrating. LOL
    however, on the brighter side. if you survive the frustration and get a hold on the process its great. its relaxing, its quiet, and produces beautiful strong bonds on any metal.
    yes its worth the learning curve, but not all will make the cut. it is not as easy as it looks on TV. but it is as cool. stereo ruining low in the back ground and a nice relaxing arc to spend the day with. great for relaxing and art work. and a great skill to have. but it is no impulse thing and can not be rushed.

    if you are in a rush MIG is your only option and i hope its not used on anything critical. welding is not as easy as it looks and should be taken seriously. MIG welds can look great and not hold for poooo. welding should not be taken lightly. just look at the garbage in the "why stupid people" thread.
    put the time in and learn it properly. it will be a skill that you will be glad you have for a life time. and save you big $$ in repairs, even just around the house.

    the key here is, put the time in to learn it right you will be glad you did. try to force it and you will be hating it in no time.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Most likely in Florida
    Posts
    111

    Default

    OK. Maybe I have come off sounding too gung-ho and that I can learn this in no time flat. If that is how I am portraying myself, I apologize. I know it is a skill that takes lots and lots of practice. TIG even more so (as nobody seems willing to let me forget ). The same goes for aluminum.

    I have been considering learning to weld for a few years now. I have reached the point were I have finally decided to attempt to do so. Yes, I do have projects already in mind. No, they do not have to get done anytime soon. At least by me. The few little things that should probably get done within the next six months or so I can easily take to a local metal shop and have done if I am still not competent by then. Also, none of the projects I have in mind are suspension related sorts of things. Putting my life in danger with rookie welding skills is not something I plan to do.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Thumbs up

    sounds to me like you are a perfect candidate for the TA-185.
    i and probably the others got the impression you needed to get this done soon and could be going on impulse. i suspect within a month if you give it some time, TIG could be to the point of producing solid welds, even if not beautiful welds.
    i have truly enjoyed my TA-185 and have no problem recommending it as a fine TIG unit. its not the Dyn but is a fine alternative if 240V is available. and the accessory kit that comes with it is of top quality as is the unit its self.
    i recommend 2% lanthanated as the best choice for tungsten. it works just as well on AC as DC so its got you coverd on both options and holds up well to heat on the higher options as well as works great in 1/16" low apm options.

    TIG will use a great deal of argon, especially in the learning stage. keep this in mind when getting a tank for it.

    you will also want to get SS. wire brushes for aluminum work and keep all your prep accessory's for aluminum separate from the ones you use on steel and SS.

    i'm shore in time you will be very glad you chose to learn TIG, i know i am.

    welcome to the world of TIG.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Most likely in Florida
    Posts
    111

    Default

    Thanks. I'm sure I'll have many questions down the road. Now I just have to make the final, final decision to make the purchase. Then do it.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Default

    when you finally get ready to order i highly recommend IOC(see above). i purchased all my welding machines and plasma cutters threw him. not only is he fast but he was there for me when i needed help on a warranty issue. he got me the phone #'s to the top people and helped me get it all coordinated threw my local service department. being a internet sale he could have easily just said " take it to some one near you and let them handle it" but instead he got me #'s and made some calls for me to get it all handled quickly and painlessly. needless to say he is my first choice dealer.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Most likely in Florida
    Posts
    111

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fun4now View Post
    when you finally get ready to order i highly recommend IOC(see above).
    Aye. I plan on buying from them. Excellent prices and good recomendations.

    Now I just need to come up with a list of everything else I need. Rods, helmet, gloves, fire extinquisher! , argon tank, etc. Feel free to suggest things (especially things not obvious to the likes of me).

    Are torch consumables swappable among brands? Or do you have to buy brand specific parts?

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Default

    the TA comes with a CK brand torch #17, or mine did any way. may be a weld craft now not shore, but they are all for the most part interchangeable within the #.
    #17 being a 150amp air cooled torch.
    gloves ( i really like the Miller line), hood ( i have the BWE) you will need more cups and guts for the torch as it comes with one set. and the cups will break if drooped.
    filler is dependent apon what you will be welding(LWS will be best source).
    if you don't have one a 4.5" grinder and some flap disks are great. metabo is top dog here but high $$. for home use a portacabe or dewalt is a good option. i recently got a craftmen 7 amp, so far i like it but my portacable are my favorite.(could not afford a dewalt..some day maybe)
    flap disks the walters are one of the top dog's but again you have to shell out the $$ for them.
    these guys are the best $ and a good quality disk.
    http://stores.ebay.com/Lehigh-Valley-Abrasives
    i have used them with great results.

    hope thats of some help. the wife is dragging me off to bed so i gotta go.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Lightbulb

    dont forget to make one of these for it.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    673

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by root View Post
    OK. Maybe I have come off sounding too gung-ho and that I can learn this in no time flat. If that is how I am portraying myself, I apologize. I know it is a skill that takes lots and lots of practice. TIG even more so (as nobody seems willing to let me forget ). The same goes for aluminum.

    I have been considering learning to weld for a few years now. I have reached the point were I have finally decided to attempt to do so. Yes, I do have projects already in mind. No, they do not have to get done anytime soon. At least by me. The few little things that should probably get done within the next six months or so I can easily take to a local metal shop and have done if I am still not competent by then. Also, none of the projects I have in mind are suspension related sorts of things. Putting my life in danger with rookie welding skills is not something I plan to do.

    Naive and delusional, maybe. But you'll find that 'too gung-ho' will come in very handy.

    Your second paragraph says everything I wanted to hear, like it's any of my business. You've been wanting to do this for years, awesome! You're making it happen. And you'll never regret buying too much welder.

    These guys love pictures, when you start blowing holes, post pics. Someone will help ya.

    Good luck!!
    RETIRED desk jockey.

    Hobby weldor with a little training.

    Craftsman O/A---Flat, Vert, Ovhd, Horz.

    Miller Syncrowave 250.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Most likely in Florida
    Posts
    111

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fun4now View Post
    the wife is dragging me off to bed so i gotta go.
    Insert joke here about why that might be an occassion to frown.

    Thanks for the equipment supply input. Always helpful.

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