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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

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    the TA will do the job no question there, just a question of time.
    time to learn, time to get the job done.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Most likely in Florida
    Posts
    111

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    I just thought of four more questions.

    1. With a TIG, can you make small tack welds without the filler rod? That is, if I'm holding something in position with one hand, can I tack with the other using a TIG welder? I think I've seen people do it, but wasn't sure.

    2. What does the electrical plug look like on the TA185? Sounds like a silly question, but if I try to arrange to get a 230V outlet in my garage before the TA185 shows up, I'd like to make sure it is the right one. I assume it is essentially like the 120V, a three prong, but a little larger than a 120V? It is the three phase outlet that is really different, right?

    3. How long is the power cord on the TA185?

    4. What amperage breaker circuit should I set this up on? 30A? 40A?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

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    nothing against the TA-185, i love mine. but i would not count out the pasport pro without trying it out first. its gotten great reviews, its easyer to learn and much easyer to tack with.and 120V is an option
    but yes you can tack with TIG, not as easily as with mig and in some cases i find filler is needed. again i'm no pro at TIG, but find tacking with filler much easyer. big time so with aluminum. again all part of the longer learning time.
    the plug is a standerd 240V plug. see pic. 30 amp breaker is fine.
    the cord is about 10ft. but i did not put a tape on it. might be in the sale page.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Most likely in Florida
    Posts
    111

    Default

    Cool. Thanks for the plug pics. I went to Lowe's to scope things out and found something like four different 230V, 3-prong plug types. They couldn't just make things simple.

    And now I think you are just trying to drive me crazy. When I think I've decided on the Passport, you mention the TA. Just when I think I've decide on the TA, you give the Passport a plug. If they find me babbling in a corner, I hope you feel sorry.

    The passport does make good sense. I still like the 120V ability as I wouldn't need to deal with running a 230V line initially, and my immediate needs should be covered with only 120V. Plus it does sound like I could pick it up and work with it faster being a novice. My one single fear is that I'll eventually not be able to do something I want to do and have to buy another unit. Not that it is a bad thing, but right now justifying the cost of either is a close thing.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    843

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    I'll make this simple for you then. 16 ga aluminum with a standard ( non-pulsing ) GMAW like a Passport is extremely difficult. The rate of travel will be very fast. You'd basically have very little to no control.

    Between a standard GMAW unit and a TIG, the TIG is most definitely the way to go for welding 16 ga aluminum. You'll have far more control over the weld puddle with TIG, and even more yet if the TIG unit offers pulse as an option, and then it is used.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

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    Just when I think I've decide on the TA, you give the Passport a plug. If they find me babbling in a corner, I hope you feel sorry.

    LOL i been there done that.
    i really was not trying to drive ya nuts, its a hard choice. and with $ tight its even harder. if you are going to be doing it to make some $$ its not so bad as you can always make the $$ with one to get the other later and have both.
    sounds like Danny put in the deciding vote for ya. i have never MIG welded aluminum so cant say how well it will go. most of the work you are doing dose normally get done with TIG . so may just be best for you to just learn the TIG .

    yes the TA-185 has pulse (i saw that one coming)
    the receptacle for the plug is like $12-$15 and having 240V in the shop is always a good thing. soon you will be adding a real air compressor and you will need 240V for that too.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    673

    Cool

    PLEASE don't take this wrong. I'm new on here and don't want to get evicted.

    You said you've never welded before and it doesn't look that hard and you want to start with 16ga aluminum.

    IT IS HARD. So don't think it just happens. You also said you don't have much time, it's all about time.

    I just don't want you to think you can buy a welder (even a $4000 tig) and start welding 16ga alum. You're setting yourself up for failure.

    If you have someone to show you the tricks, maybe. But with no instruction, you have a long uphill road ahead.

    I'll soon add my signature which will say I'm a hobby welder. And I'm new enough to remember how hard it was to learn on my own. I have a Miller Syncrowave 250 that took me a long time to get 'ok' with.

    I guess I'd rather hurt you now than mislead ya.
    Last edited by Craig in Denver; 01-28-2008 at 10:01 PM. Reason: I can't beleive I misspelled "Syncrowave".

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Saskatoon, Sask, Canada
    Posts
    1,270

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    I'd have to agree with Craig, you have a long road ahead, it's gonna take time and practice. Don't get us wrong it can be done, but will take time to do well.
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  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Most likely in Florida
    Posts
    111

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    Quote Originally Posted by fun4now View Post
    soon you will be adding a real air compressor and you will need 240V for that too.
    Hehe. Funny you should mention "a real air compressor" as that is one of those things I bought to cover my then current need and have since discovered I should have bought a little more. I thought I was being a smart shopper only to later realize my mistake.

    Don't worry, I know I will likely suck beyond all expectations when I start. I'm not so full of myself to expect otherwise. Almost.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    836

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    Quote Originally Posted by root View Post
    Hehe. Funny you should mention "a real air compressor" as that is one of those things I bought to cover my then current need and have since discovered I should have bought a little more. I thought I was being a smart shopper only to later realize my mistake.

    Don't worry, I know I will likely suck beyond all expectations when I start. I'm not so full of myself to expect otherwise. Almost.
    without a doubt you will not do well the first time. none of us did. If money is an issue ( as it is for most of us ) I think the TA185 wouldnt be a bad choice. The only thing that concerns me a bit is the "hurry" you seem to be in. This is going to take some time, seriously. I think if you approach it with wanting to learn how to weld, rather then wanting to weld a project, you may have better luck sticking to it. Also you dont need a fancy machine to weld aluminum, the humble OA torch will do a fine job, but with a learning curve. I would find someone in your area as a teacher, cut out 50 coupons, and start learning the good and the bad.
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