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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Posts
    7,447

    Red face

    I came out of a Aircraft mechanics/avionics background, and was given a choice between repairing avionics (which I should have taken, but I had to move to do it), or happenend on a higher paying welder repair facility which due to a down turn in the aircraft fixit business.

    OK, most electricians (the 300 or so around here) can't read a schematic if thier life depended on it. Last week I got called out for a service call just to find the machine in question has been stripped apart by an electrician who couldn't find the problems where in this case a toggle was in the wrong position.

    Yes being a welder tech is a specialized trade, you really have to be able to logicaly think the problem out, then you have to logically find the route cause of the failure in the first place so that it does not occour again. So just because a board failed, why did that board fail. Stuff like that keeps me up a night.

    We have to understand the theorys behind all brands of machines, know how they work, and hopefully know how to repair them once they fail. We also have to know how to weld in all processes. We have to converse directly with customers, and operators so must be pleasant dealing with thier (in most cases) stupidity. We pay to get updated and are tested constantly on the new technologys

    If not, we might as well apprentice to be a low payed Electrician

  2. #12

    Default It's all good

    Gentlemen,

    I understand your position as it pertains to the skill level of individual tradesmen. There are good and bad (and downright incompetent) people in all walks of life.

    Cruizer, you are right about electricians and reading electromic schematics. Most do not have the requisite knowledge or experience to interperet what they see. But you must know that this is not their area of expertise. Electrical construction,power distribution and conrtrols are a different world than troubleshooting to component level on electronics circuitry at the test bench and machine repair. No better or worse, just different.

    P.S.-- I don't know how it is in your neck of the woods but suggesting that electricians are low-paid is probably one of the funnier statements I've read in this forum. I'm not here to brag, but since you've made it an issue, I have had weeks on nuclear power plant outages where I have made over 5K in one week. I know you're just trying to get under my skin but it's still a ridiculous statement.
    Last edited by emlupi; 05-16-2011 at 10:16 AM.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Posts
    7,447

    Default

    Average starting wage for a welder tech, with a few basic factory courses is around $20-25/hr. with 3yrs in this field $38 to $40+. As a subcontractor I get $96/hr + travel. Then of course there are parts used, cable, remote and machines sales.

    Sooo making $5K a week every week is quite easy now that its booming again.

    I didn't have to apprentice anywhere, though have pulled & wired entire industrial buildings with the supervision of a journeyman electrician. Pretty easy stuff compared with my exsisting trade.

  4. #14

    Default Interesting

    I find it very curious that even though I have said nothing negative about your job or your profession, ( I have respect for anyone who does their job in a professional manner) you take every opportunity to make disparaging remarks about me and mine. Even though you don't know me and have no idea what I am capable of, or not. Also, you threw the money aspect into the conversation and now have come to take a defensive position on that, as well.

    You act as if pulling wire in buildings is all there is to the easy electrical trade, which is another in a series of derogatory and ignorant remarks on your part. I could trivialize your job as well and equate you with the Maytag repairman but I know better. As I stated earlier, I have respect for anyone who takes their trade seriously and gives it their best at all times, which you seem to do.

    Yes, we all get the point that you are a substantial human being with a true purpose and place in this life. We are very happy for you. You might try extending some basic human courtesy to others, if you are able.
    Last edited by emlupi; 05-16-2011 at 01:38 PM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Posts
    7,447

    Default

    I am just playing around, in actually I watch online movies and on the internet half the day on
    my shops big screen, going to be tossing this 42" LCD in favour of a 60" LCD as soon as my landlord takes out a wall fo me.

  6. #16

    Default Good to go

    Sometimes it's hard to tell who's yanking your chain on these forums. Good luck to you.

  7. #17

    Default syncrowave 250. no amp. control?

    I have a syncrowave 250.Try to tig with it but have no control of my amperage it max out. I have to run it off the panel. any ideas??? thanks

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Posts
    7,447

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by browniethewelder View Post
    I have a syncrowave 250.Try to tig with it but have no control of my amperage it max out. I have to run it off the panel. any ideas??? thanks
    Why are you digging up an old thread? never the less, check your Remote
    "C" to "D" must read around 1K ohm, "C" to "E" must vary between 1 ohm and 1K Ohm as the pedal is moved up and down.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    16919 Pole Rd. Brethren, MI 49619
    Posts
    4,376

    Default

    One of my buds was moaning about money,,, million dollar mind 25 cents of real ambition,,, ha ,,, but I suggest he march down to the welding dealer or toss a sign out for machine repair at the place he works at now.

    I bought an 300 synch for 200$ with a foot pedal and set of service manuals, the guy that had it figures the freq not working right which was not the case, something on the AC output, anyway, score my bud into looking at it, 45 mins later hcomeses back toting a circuit board, I was pretty sure I was golden at that point, he wanders back in next weeksaysya it was a transistor that cost 50 cents at Radio shack, ha had one on his bench. I tipped him a hundred bucks.
    As for electricians,, I am a great installer, bareknownow an ohm from a watt and for the most part could care less, its too complicated. I know this, I know several masters with papers, one lives down the road,,, when I get a problem with controls, something with all that stuff in it, dozens or hundreds of wires, switches, boards, system stuff, heating or cooling equipment, I don't call any of them, tfurnacenas guy,,, etc, I call my TV repair bud, when I want to know aeliminateate the guessing he is 10 times the trouble shooter that a lot of them put together would be.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    483

    Default

    I came out of a Aircraft mechanics/avionics background,
    Me too (Broncos/Phantoms/F-16 A/B/C/D) and enjoyed it greatly both in-shop and flightline.

    What's a good "roadmap" to try for if I want to learn welder repair and get factory certs, and what are some examples of those?

    What test equipment do you use/recommend? I'm far away (SC) so I guarantee I won't poach any business!

    What information sources do factory techs have that "civilians" don't in terms of tech data, bulletins, etc?

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